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Download Weapons of Mass Instruction: A Schoolteacher's Journey Through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Weapons of Mass Instruction: A Schoolteachers Journey Through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling (Unabridged), by John Taylor Gatto
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (513 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Taylor Gatto Narrator: Michael Puttonen Publisher: Post Hypnotic Press Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2013 ISBN:
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John Taylor Gatto's Weapons of Mass Instruction focuses on mechanisms of traditional education which cripple imagination, discourage critical thinking, and create a false view of learning as a byproduct of rote-memorization drills. Gatto's earlier book, Dumbing Us Down, introduced the now-famous expression of the title into the common vernacular. Weapons of Mass Instruction adds another chilling metaphor to the brief against conventional schooling.

Gatto demonstrates that the harm school inflicts is rational and deliberate. The real function of pedagogy, he argues, is to render the common population manageable. To that end, young people must be conditioned to rely upon experts, to remain divided from natural alliances and to accept disconnections from their own lived experiences. They must at all costs be discouraged from developing self-reliance and independence.

Escaping this trap requires a strategy Gatto calls open source learning which imposes no artificial divisions between learning and life. Through this alternative approach our children can avoid being indoctrinated-only then can they achieve self-knowledge, good judgment, and courage.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 MichelleMarie | 2/20/2014

    " Incredibly interesting topic but Gatto's writing style was way over my head (which is the only reason I gave it 2 stars instead of more). Really makes you think about "schooling" and "education," how those two things are SEPERATE. He is also an advocate for the open-conspiracy of just saying "I prefer not to take your test" in regards to standardized testing. Above all what I really took away from this book is how we (as a society) need to re-evaluate what we define as education and success. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leah Macvie | 2/18/2014

    " This book is amazing, but as I said on my Amazon review, it needs a better editor. For a fight against compulsory schooling, this bad editing, filled with misspellings and poor spacing, demeans the very motives of this plea. Understanding the main theme, that compulsory schooling is meant to break down society and provide us all with one direction: to become uninteresting, fat consuming children, is essential for those involved in education. However, I don't feel that the main goal is realistic. To ask schools to just stop teaching at this part of the game would be detrimental. Why? The uneducated, uncultured, uninteresting probably can't educate their children. The book fails to suggest baby steps we can take as a society, because yes, we need them. As a fan of educational choices, I do love the options presented. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 2/15/2014

    " A little heavy on the conspiracy theories, but Gatto makes some good points about how we manage education in this country. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy VanSpunky | 2/11/2014

    " So far this is an amazing history of the American government education system. We have all been indoctrinated... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Philip | 2/11/2014

    " Provocative reflections on Gatto's 30+ years in public education, including discussions about the evolution of the modern public school system and ruminations on whether its advantages outweigh its harmful effects (he says no, but evidence is anecdotal). Contains many tales of exceptionally creative and successful individuals who were better educated outside the public school system. Could have been worth four stars, but it had a handful of annoying typos that should not have appeared in print. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jackie Krasuski | 1/31/2014

    " This book lays out in plain English the suspicions I have had about the public education system all my life. It is a well-written and supported argument. As a public high school teacher, I also realize that this information can be useful in creating lessons that break kids out of this horrible cycle of not being able to think or problem solve on their own. And yes, to even refuse standardized testing! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Everett | 1/24/2014

    " This book is fairly amazing because it challenges conventional thinking as it pertains to compulsory education. If you have an open mind you are sure to find the book thought provoking at times. The only facet of this book that made me give it 4 stars as opposed to 5 is tendency for the author to either ramble at times or simply repeat previous points too much. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 C. Tilden | 1/19/2014

    " sometimes excellent and sometimes infuriating, sometimes pointed and sometimes mundane, but always controversial. I just think it is waaaay too humanistic, and he almost seems to have a disdain for childhood. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Autumn | 1/3/2014

    " I agree with his idea of education. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily Rooney | 12/4/2013

    " After reading this and Dumbing Us Down I am seriously considering homeschooling our kids (something I never thought I'd do). The information in this book is invaluable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 12/4/2013

    " He seems extra angry at some points in this, but it can sure take a load off of the pressure for kids to 'achieve'. Achieve what exactly? I really liked this book and read it in a few days. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marisa | 11/9/2013

    " As much as I wanted to like this one (I loved A Different Kind of Teacher), this one was too preachy...even for me. Honestly, I didn't even finish it. It was a bit extreme for my taste. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Camilla | 10/27/2013

    " Unbelievable book. I didn't want it to end! It was so....good. Opened my eyes to the standardized testing in our schools and so much more! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mihail | 9/14/2013

    " Eye-opening book about the US schooling system. Most of the concepts are valid in other systems and countries too. Never got the structure and the organization of the book, but really liked the references and the true stories through the eyes of Gatto. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kathryn Muratore | 8/28/2013

    " This was just a series of anecdotes and I did not learn very much. I also did not like the writer's style. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 emma | 4/5/2013

    " This should be essential reading for everyone who's ever been through a compulsory education system, and particularly for parents of children going through it. You'll never see schooling in the same way again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susie | 3/24/2013

    " Gatto presents some interesting ideas. I'm not sure if I agree with most of it, but certainly I share some of his points of view. At times, I got lost in his rhetoric - too convoluted, too many points in one sentence. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin | 3/6/2013

    " This volume is essentially the summary of what John Taylor Gatto exposed in his seminal An Underground History of American Education. Recommended for all citizens, but especially those contemplating college. "

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