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Download Walking Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Walking (Unabridged), by Henry David Thoreau
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (987 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Henry David Thoreau Narrator: Larry McKeever Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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In wilderness is the preservation of the world. Life consists with wilderness. The most alive is the wildest. Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him. Philosopher and writer Henry David Thoreau preferred to contemplate the nature of man and his environment while walking. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 April | 2/10/2014

    " My favorite book of all time! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gillian | 2/8/2014

    " "...in Wildness is the preservation of the World." Thoreau's two essays in my version of the text, "Walking" and "Night and Moonlight" focus on the importance of not only appreciating existing wildness around us, but cultivating wildness in ourselves and the surrounding areas. Almost contradicting himself in some parts, he suggest that the Farmer is above the Indian, in that he believes that some cultivation and agriculture is better than leaving things lie. At the same time, he holds the view of his time that the Indians (read, Native Americans) are a primitive culture with no complex technology, saying that they would cultivate the land with a "clam shell." Despite this evidence of his time period and a few slight contradictions, I found these essays to be fresh and informative, still applicable in a time when nature seems to be slipping away through our fingers. Thoreau's places where "no man has stood before and no man will ever stand" are growing few and far between. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/3/2014

    " Rebecca Solnit, despite doing this like 200 years after this, did it better. But the reason I like Thoreau as a rhetorician is that he's never too annoying. He's very literal and he's very clear and rarely has incomprehensible, highfalutin' ideas. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 2/3/2014

    " Seemed to drag a bit when he got off the topic of walking. More philosophizing than naturalist observation, but then he was dying when he wrote this. He uses some really wonderful turns of phrase. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bookreaderljh | 1/24/2014

    " I believe I read this many years ago but revisited it this week as I attend the AVA convention in Orlando. I love to walk (it's right up there with reading) and this is a nice short essay basically that promotes walking not only for our soul but as a reflection of society and foreward yearning during the time this was written. I loved the quote regarding merchants who sit in their stores or offices all afternoon rather than taking a walk as Thoreau believes. He wonders why they haven't all committed suicide. I understand that as days without walks make me want to tear my hair out. He talks a lot about nature and going towards the southwest as all good explorers do. Good reminder to watch where you walk and though I can enjoy a city walk as much (or more) than a walk in the woods - Thoreau definitely had the right idea. What would he think of civilization in America now where so few people walk - encased in their cars and air-conditioned buildings. It leaves no room for grounding into the earth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marts (Thinker) | 1/22/2014

    " Thoreau's philosophy on the importance of considering nature in everyday life through the application of one rather simple action which most either neglect or haven't time for... walking... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Deema | 1/14/2014

    " It is not a written experience on walking rather a walking experience in writing, whatever that means. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 1/13/2014

    " As always Thoreau writes of Nature in a way that makes you yearn to be outdoors in the elements and observe what is in the world around you. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dylan | 1/4/2014

    " nice short read philosophising on why we walk, and nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 12/29/2013

    " simple, to the point and brilliant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 12/5/2013

    " I've never read anything by Thoreau before. He certainly paints some pretty pictures. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Pat Monahan | 11/29/2013

    " I always feel guilty that I don't enjoy Thoreau more. I found Walking interesting, but I was glad when I was done reading. Luckily it was a short book. I'll continue to read Thoreau. Maybe some day I'll see the light. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren | 11/18/2013

    " One of my favorite books and authors. Really fueled my wanderlust to the the next level while reinforcing a lot of my beliefs about society. He doesn't really hold much back. And the last paragraph of the book...Chills. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mj | 11/15/2013

    " Thoreau is a sanctimonious prat. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ron | 11/7/2013

    " Beautiful language but maybe I wasn't in the mood. It's comforting to go back and walk through nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin | 10/14/2013

    " Thoreau is probably the wittiest writer I've ever read. While he can sometimes be a little verbose and dry, I keep coming back to him for those little gems scattered throughout his work. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan | 9/3/2013

    " This one is a classic. I read it years ago, but forgot how many famous and remarkable Thoreau lines come from this short essay. Best known is "In wildness is the preservation of the world." But it is a meditation on wilderness and walking and the meaning of American history, too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 4/1/2013

    " More succint and accessible, but also more harsh and passionate (less reflective) than Walden--Thoreau at his philosophical best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Innes Ferguson | 3/10/2013

    " I really enjoyed this essay from Thoreau. Insightful, poignant and yet surprisingly easy to read due to his style of writing. It wouldn't be out of place in a current issue of the Atlantic. In fact as our lives get busier and more hectic this essay remains as relevant today as it was in mid 1800's. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kimberly | 2/4/2013

    " It's a little book. I can't take those seriously. But I saw it on here and I read it. I thought it was just a novelty item. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ken Camp | 1/18/2013

    " One of my favorite works by my favorite author "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adam | 11/24/2012

    " I'm in BIG re-read phase of life right now and I'm feeling curious what my 34 yr old eyes have to say about some classics I read in my early 20's. I'm feeling Thoreau and Walking is a short read to ease back into him.... I will tackle Walden again after. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 11/9/2012

    " There were parts that I thought "I couldn't agree more." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 gretta treuscorff | 5/7/2012

    " i like walking. so does henry david thoreau. its cool to geek out over simple things with a dead dude. i find myself exclaiming things like "totally" and "yeah yeah yeah" while reading this. i fucking love walking and reading "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna | 4/17/2012

    " "I cannot preserve my health and spirits without sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brian | 11/22/2011

    " Maybe I wasn't in the right frame of mind for this. The first 1/3 was promising, but it wandered after that. Perhaps it is better read in small portions from the porch of a mtn. cabin or a quiet trail somewhere. Nevertheless, it just didn't do it for me like Walden did. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 4/20/2011

    " There were parts that I thought "I couldn't agree more." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lily | 4/13/2011

    " I read this book while on a very rainy day on a tropical island (Palau Selingnaan)- it reminded me how important it is to value nature and live in the moment. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenni | 2/10/2011

    " A little inspirational book on the defense of wilderness. Get outside and enjoy what you have. :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott | 12/30/2010

    " Being one who likes to saunter in nature, this book struck a chord in me and I enjoyed every word. This philosophy is quite opposite of that of Locke which I just read. I too find myself in nature. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Megan | 12/7/2010

    " Not bad, has some really good bits. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gretchen | 11/7/2010

    " Yet another essay to read. I felt that while Thoreau was very intelligent and made some interesting points, I felt that this essay was repetitive and got boring after a while. I generally liked Walking, but it was nothing special. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Natalie | 9/9/2010

    " incredibly inspiring piece of writing- made me talk a long walk in nature "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Parag | 5/4/2010

    " This wasn't as good as I was expecting. Though there's a choice quote about the Hindoos and their wisdom in there somewhere... just after the Hottentots. Okay, it's dated, but I think I got what he was saying. Still not a big fan of this one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jarkko | 3/29/2010

    " With great ideas and lots of good quotes, this is an inspiring little book. Its writing isn't perfect and at times, it left me unsure of what Thoreau is really writing about, but still a book I'd recommend. At least it won't take more than an hour or two to read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bob | 5/11/2009

    " Gratifying summary of why I walk by a fellow traveler "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim | 2/14/2009

    " A wounderful essay. It applies better to today I feel than it did when he wrote it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joseph | 2/12/2009

    " This book is not for everyone, but if you are the type of person who can pack lunch and head for the woods to lose your self and the "wonderful life" you will relate.

    I read parts of this book weekly it is by my bed side. "

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