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Download Uranium Wars: The Scientific Rivalry that Created the Nuclear Age Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Uranium Wars: The Scientific Rivalry that Created the Nuclear Age Audiobook, by Amir D. Aczel
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (41 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Amir D. Aczel Narrator: Eric Conger Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2009 ISBN: 9781427209320
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Uranium, a nondescript element when found in nature, in the past century has become more sought after than gold. Its nucleus is so heavy that it is highly unstable and radioactive. If broken apart, it unleashes the tremendous power within the atom—the most controversial type of energy ever discovered.

Set against the darkening shadow of World War II, Amir D. Aczel's suspenseful account tells the story of the fierce competition among the day's top scientists to harness nuclear power. The intensely driven Marie Curie identified radioactivity. The University of Berlin team of Otto Hahn and Lise Meitner--he an upright, politically conservative German chemist and she a soft-spoken Austrian Jewish theoretical physicist--achieved the most spectacular discoveries in fission. Curie's daughter, Irène Joliot-Curie, raced against Meitner and Hahn to break the secret of the splitting of the atom. As the war raged, Niels Bohr, a founder of modern physics, had a dramatic meeting with Werner Heisenberg, the German physicist in charge of the Nazi project to beat the Allies to the bomb. And finally, in 1942, Enrico Fermi, a prodigy from Rome who had fled the war to the United States, unleashed the first nuclear chain reaction in a racquetball court at the University of Chicago.
At a time when the world is again confronted with the perils of nuclear armament, Amir D. Aczel's absorbing story of a rivalry that changed the course of history is as thrilling and suspenseful as it is scientifically revelatory and newsworthy.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sally Smith | 5/2/2013

    " If you enjoy history, science, and find the Manhattan Project interesting, then you'll love this book. If those interests aren't yours, then skip this. I love history, science, and find the Manhattan Project interesting, so I really enjoyed it and learned some new things. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Justin | 3/12/2013

    " Excellent source of information. I loved the chapters on the progression of the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. He was a little slow in some of the biography sections, but overall a good book. I learned a lot about nuclear reactions, bombs and plants. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan Munn | 5/5/2012

    " A layman's history of the scientific pathway to the atomic bomb. Fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Justin | 5/23/2011

    " Excellent source of information. I loved the chapters on the progression of the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. He was a little slow in some of the biography sections, but overall a good book. I learned a lot about nuclear reactions, bombs and plants. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan | 12/30/2009

    " A layman's history of the scientific pathway to the atomic bomb. Fun to read. "

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About the Author
Author Amir D. Aczel

Amir Aczel (1950–2015) earned his PhD in mathematics from UC Berkeley and is the author of the acclaimed Fermat’s Last Theorum, which was published in twenty-two languages. In 2012 he was awarded a Sloan Foundation grant; in 2004 he was awarded the prestigious John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. From 2005 to 2007, Aczel was a visiting scholar at Harvard. He was also a research fellow in the history of science at Boston University. He wrote for Discover magazine online, regularly published in Scientific American as well as science pieces for the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. He often interviewed about science on radio and television, including recent appearances on NPR’s Talk of the Nation’s Science Friday.

About the Narrator

Eric Conger is a stage actor, voice artist, and award-winning audiobook narrator. He has narrated more than 125 fiction and nonfiction audiobooks and was a four-time finalist for the Audie Award, both as a sole narrator in 2007 and 2008 and as part of a multicast reading in 2001 and 2012. He has earned six AudioFile Earphones Awards. His extensive voice-over work includes more than 5,000 narrations for commercial ventures. A graduate of Wesleyan University and the University of Paris, he also works as a writer and playwright. He has appeared in over fifty plays and has also translated plays of Molière and Feydeau for regional theaters.