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Download Twain's Humor: A Collection Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Twains Humor: A Collection (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (125 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Thomas Becker Publisher: Commuter's Library Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2004 ISBN:
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A collection of 23 of Twain's funniest stories and essays, ranging from tongue in cheek to the fantastic. This collection includes:

  • Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (1865)
  • The Story of the Old Ram (Roughing It, 1872)
  • Buck Fanshaw's Funeral (Roughing It, 1872)
  • Tom Quartz (Roughing It, 1872)
  • What Stumped the Bluejays (1880)
  • Journalism in Tennessee (1869)
  • How I Edited an Agricultural Paper (1870)
  • The Facts in the Great Beef Contract (1870)
  • The Great Landslide Case (1870)
  • The Canvasser's Tale (1845)
  • The Recent Carnival of Crime in Connecticut (1876)
  • Cannibalism in the Cars (1868)
  • My Watch (1903)
  • Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses (1895)
  • Political Economy (1870)
  • The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm (1882)
  • The Art of Authorship (1890)
  • A Genuine Mexican Plug (Roughing It, 1872)
  • Experience of the McWilliamses with Membranous Croup (1875)
  • First Interview with Artemus Ward (1875)
  • Punch, Brothers, Punch (1876)
  • To the California Pioneers (1869)
  • An Author's Soldiering (1887) Download and start listening now!

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    Listener Opinions

    • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kayla | 11/29/2013

      " Had to read this for school; was pretty good-funny in parts, kinda boring in parts. But good if you want to sample some of Mark Twain's writing. :) "

    • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hannah | 11/11/2013

      " I love Mark Twain! He's a really great author! I particularly like the story about going to a barber. "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Terry | 5/31/2013

      " It was fun to read an old classic. Twain does have a way with words! "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pat | 1/18/2013

      " Short stories, many famous. I skipped the ones with animals. Just not my sensibility. "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will Daly | 5/31/2012

      " Pretty good. Yup. Nothing that special about it. "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cortino | 5/20/2012

      " I thought this book of Twain's short stories to be really fun. It really gave a great insight to his humor and how that fit into the era that he lived. "

    • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jan | 4/1/2012

      " Well I got through one disk out of five, listening to this, and I just can't get into it. These are Twain's short stories, but I have found none of them funny at all so far. Hard going to listen to because of the language too. Giving up... "

    • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie Miller | 12/18/2011

      " Really funny. Some stories better than others, but all really funny. "

    • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tommy | 8/13/2011

      " I liked it. A quick read with entertaining vignettes. I enjoyed his take of going to the barber with its modern sensibility and relatable subject. I also enjoyed his witty criticism of James Fenimore Cooper's works. A good jumping off point for my dive into Twain's work. "

    • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 5/16/2011

      " This was a re-read. It is Mark Twains travelogue about his trip through Europe and the Middle East. A really funny classic. "

    • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew | 2/5/2011

      " Gotta love Mark Twain for being spot on 100 years later with all of his impressions. "

    • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gerald | 2/1/2011

      " As with Roughing It, so with Innocents. Simply a fun adventure through Europe and the Near East, filled with Twain's biting critique, both of the visited and the visitor, and humorous observations. Many wonderful stories and one-liners - wait til you get to the Fergusons! "

    • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 sharon | 11/17/2010

      " Mark Twain was WAY ahead of his time with this hilarious insightful travelogue of his world trip in 1867!!!! Read it! "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Justine | 11/13/2010

      " I have been reading this book for about a year and a half. I love Twain; I love Europe; I should love this book. Just a bit long-winded. "

    • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joseph | 11/10/2010

      " Still great after all these years, though it bogs down a bit in the Palestine section. "

    • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 10/31/2010

      " This is a special kind-of -different tale or two from the beste story teller of all time. "

    • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robin | 10/26/2010

      " Courtney recommended this book to me a few years back. If you've traveled at all in Europe it is fun to compare how things have changed (or not) in the years since Mark Twain had his adventure abroad. "

    • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Glo | 10/7/2010

      " I found it very difficult to read, wordy and sluggish. "

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    About the Author
    Author Mark Twain

    Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

    In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

    In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.