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Download This Is Water: The Original David Foster Wallace Recording Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample This Is Water: The Original David Foster Wallace Recording Audiobook, by David Foster Wallace
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (4,697 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Foster Wallace Narrator: Unspecified Publisher: Hachette Audio Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2010 ISBN:
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Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life

Only once did David Foster Wallace give a public talk on his views on life, during a commencement address given in 2005 at Kenyon College. This is the audio recording of David Foster Wallace delivering that very address. How does one keep from going through their comfortable, prosperous adult life unconsciously? How do we get ourselves out of the foreground of our thoughts and achieve compassion? The speech captures Wallace's electric intellect as well as his grace in attention to others. After his death, it became a treasured piece of writing reprinted in The Wall Street Journal and the London Times, commented on endlessly in blogs, and emailed from friend to friend.

Writing with his one-of-a-kind blend of causal humor, exacting intellect, and practical philosophy, David Foster Wallace probes the challenges of daily living and offers advice that renews us with every listen.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen Greene | 2/16/2014

    " "'Learning how to think' really means learning how to exercise control over how and what you think." Delivered as a commencement address beseeching to live life consciously, though seemingly difficult. This short essay wasn't about choosing religion, or possession or right vs. wrong... it was simply about self and thought and choice. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Anthony Cronin | 2/16/2014

    " Download the original kenyon speech and weep dfw was a genius: humble and gracious with his ideas and knowledge "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tracey | 2/15/2014

    " A-MAZE-ING changed the way i think about life and other people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 2/12/2014

    " This is a graduation speech that David Foster Wallace gave in 2005 at Kenyon College. The book is short, with just one sentence on each page, but it shows his clear thinking and talent for discussing important things without pontificating about them. I loved it and want to give to all my friends in their 20s and 30s who are stuck in the daily grind of go to work-go home-get up and go back to work again. It helped to shift my perspective just a little bit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 2/11/2014

    " Every time I read something else by David Foster Wallace, I am alternately furious and sad that he is dead. I want to read what else he would have written! I want to be his best friend! This essay was lovely, in a very not sentimental way. I'll never wait in line at the supermarket in the same way again! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicole Jirtle | 2/10/2014

    " The small copy that was given to me for my birthday will likely not leave my purse/ tote/ backpack this year. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan Ragsdale | 2/8/2014

    " Wow! An unusual commencement address that rises above the traditional platitudes typically found in these speeches. Wallace makes a powerful connection between what he sees as the real value of a liberal education, open-mindedness, and the well-known quote from Buddha that "We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world." I was so impressed with this book that I read it aloud to my Daughter, Kelsey, the night before she entered the US Naval Academy "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fiona | 2/4/2014

    " I'm happy the author stated so clearly and non-condescendingly (to a graduating class) what is truth about the essence of the world, though it was an obvious lesson for those of us who think about the meaning of life and can ask our own questions and learn from those around us. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juan Carlos | 2/4/2014

    " A short, but abundantly sad, funny, and insightful commentary! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cindy Chou | 1/20/2014

    " it's kind of depressing to know that he had given a commencement speech which discusses survival and liviing with thoughts of suicide... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Russ | 11/18/2013

    " Now this just needed to be said by someone. Thanks, DFW. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Abby | 10/14/2013

    " This is an unbelievable book -- it presents some truths that are simple yet totally life-changing... the kind of book you wish everyone would read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allefra25 | 9/11/2013

    " Finished in about half an hour or so. I cried at the end. Is that water? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy Chu | 7/23/2013

    " This is an essay packaged as a book. I had already read the essay online. It was good but I guess the book experience didn't add anything. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 7/14/2013

    " So, I guess the answer to his own question would be "no"? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon Peele | 4/26/2013

    " A must read for anyone who considers themselves sentient. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan Usher | 1/24/2013

    " This was rather difficult, how do I rate this book? I ended up rating it based solely on the the speech itself, which is incredible, but please don't let my rating be an endorsement of the book at all; find a copy of the speech online and read it, this is a ridiculous waste of paper. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pamela | 11/23/2012

    " I'm supposed to love this, right? I can't decide. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Crowinator | 11/3/2012

    " I'm pretty sure I read this online for free, sometime after he gave the speech. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan | 10/11/2012

    " Like many of my favorite books, he says nothing new, but what we already knew. But because he is excellent with words, he is able to articulate what I feel but cannot say. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 8/5/2012

    " This essay was written for a commencement speech and focuses on choosing to live a conscious life. I hate that I can't read anything by Davis Foster Wallace now without seeing it through the fact of his death, but I'm glad that I'm reading it now, just a few days before I'm going back to school. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 3/13/2012

    " This is a great introduction to Wallace if you want to see what his writing his like. This is a commencement speech he did for a graduating class. It is depressing, brilliant, honest, and heartbreaking. An amazing piece of work that I believe everyone needs to read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly | 3/4/2012

    " Probably the best commencement speech I've read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lynn | 1/28/2012

    " This isn't a book - it's a commencement address and takes less than 20 minutes to read. If you've never stopped to think about things like empathy, choices, and mindfulness, this isn't a bad place to start. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 11/26/2011

    " Great stuff, but don't buy the "book". Is a commencement speech, not a book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon | 6/20/2011

    " An insightful and wholly consumable lecture/series of thoughts on a healthy paradigm for approaching life. Very enjoyable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kean | 6/1/2011

    " For the past couple of years, I've continued to return and revisit this commencement address, always as a reminder to myself. Wonderfully inspiring. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 5/23/2011

    " Takes half an hour to read, but you'll think about it for days. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeremy | 5/16/2011

    " Absolutely fantastic commencement address. I read a library copy--must find one for myself to keep. I'm late to the David Foster Wallace fan club, but I am definitely a member. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hosho | 5/11/2011

    " Advice like you wish you would've been given...plus a striking and simple approach to an examined and compassionate life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 5/3/2011

    " I wish I heard this commencement address when I graduated, but perhaps I wouldn't appreciate it as much as I do now. Also, this speech made me realize what makes great authors depressed/suicidal. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alicia | 4/26/2011

    " Amazing! Simple and quick to ready but realisticly inspirational! This is a must read for everyone "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dennis | 4/13/2011

    " Amazingly simple, direct and right-on target. Wish he were still with us! "

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About the Author
Author David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace (1962–2008) was the New York Times bestselling author of Infinite Jest, The Broom of the System, and Girl With Curious Hair. His essays and stories have appeared in Harper’s, the New Yorker, Playboy, Paris Review, Conjunctions, Premiere, Tennis, the Missouri Review, and the Review of Contemporary Fiction. Wallace received numerous awards, including the Whiting Award, the Lannan Award for Fiction, the QPB Joe Savago New Voices Award, and the O. Henry Award.