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Download Things Fall Apart Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Things Fall Apart Audiobook, by Chinua Achebe Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (105,355 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Chinua Achebe Narrator: Peter Francis James Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The African Trilogy Release Date: September 2015 ISBN: 9781449810184
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Originally published in 1958 and now acclaimed globally as a classic in African literature, Things Fall Apart tells the story of Okonkwo, the strong-willed and powerful leader of his village who goes to great and sometimes extreme lengths to keep from showing any weakness. When his selfish pride leads to tragedy he and his family are exiled from Umuofia, the village he has worked so hard all of his life to lead. Years later, when Okonkwo is finally allowed to return to his village he finds it has been changed in numerous ways by the invading white population which has forced its will upon his people. When Okonowo rebels it sets into motion a series of life-changing events for himself and his people. Will his pride save his village and restore its traditions or will it destroy Okonkwo?

Things Fall Apart was one of the first African novels written in English to gain critical praise worldwide. It is now one of the most popular works of fiction in school libraries throughout Africa and is considered by many English-speaking readers all around the world to be a treasured classic. And now you can find out why in this wonderful unabridged audiobook adaptation.

A tragic confrontation of tribal life and colonial rule, in perhaps the best-known novel in African literature. A warrior's fearless exterior conceals bewilderment, fear, and anger at the breakdown of his society. "Full of melodic richness, James projects Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “As old as the novel is, Things Fall Apart by Professor Chinua Achebe is one book that has captured the heart of most intellects and readers across the world. It is probably one of the books that will live forever going by the calibers of people in the world that testify to its originality…Achebe’s wise and subtle storytelling cuts to the heart of these tribal people with humanity, warmth, and humor.”

    Daily Independent (Nigeria)

  • “Peter Frances James offers a superb narration of Nigerian novelist Achebe’s deceptively simple 1959 masterpiece.”

    Library Journal

  • Things Fall Apart packs a powerful punch as Achebe holds up the ruin of one proud man to stand for the destruction of an entire culture.”

    Amazon

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Galen Burghardt | 2/15/2014

    " It's a very interesting story. Very successful in getting you into the perspective of very foreign characters. The narrative itself, kind of meh. I guess it all holds together, but very little of it feeds into the main plot. A lot of "this happened THEN this happened THEN this happened". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally | 2/15/2014

    " Heartbreaking and exquisitely poetic. I loved the simple rhythmic pace of the language which functions to create dramatic tension between the narrator's voice, and the complex inner life of the characters. An interesting supplement to this book is Achebe's essay on The African Writer and the English Language. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lex Hogan | 2/8/2014

    " Didn't like this the first time I read it. I thought the simple writing style sounded a bit uneducated. But on a second pass I really appreciated how beautiful the writing actually was. The story itself is highly intense, emotional, with some very grave and serious events. But the description is extremely detached, as though the writer is only reinforcing the helplessness of the people's position. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chad | 1/30/2014

    " I learned about the impact of colonialism from the perspective of the people who were directly affected by it "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joyce Thompson | 1/28/2014

    " This novel gains its power from its restraint. We are psychically bound to Okonkwo, we live his life, feel his emotions and think his thoughts. We are members of his family and his clan. We share his gender, his status, his virtues and his faults. We worship his gods. When the British missionaries arrive, we see them through his eyes. We swing his machete. At the end, we share his refusal to live in a world they control. No amount of rhetoric could harvest such deep connection, or such a sense of loss. This book is small, brilliant and essential. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Renee | 1/28/2014

    " For class. Interesting but sad story. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Takara Schupbach | 1/25/2014

    " I don't think this book even deserves one star. Had I not had to read this book for a class I would have stopped reading it after the first page. There was no plot, no point to any of it. Just down right stupid. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zea (AwesomeBooknerd) | 1/16/2014

    " I got confused and I read this just because I had it as my book report "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 1/14/2014

    " Yes things do fall apart, but the sad thing about this book is what caused things to fall apart. In this case it was Christian Ministers going into a Nigerian village and pretty much forcing the people to convert ; or else... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thomas | 1/6/2014

    " I enjoyed this book. I found the story stangely written in a good way. Easy read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zoe | 12/25/2013

    " Yes I read this in school, and yes, I appreciate it for it's portrayal of Africa during the time period. But oh god why "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mangaliso | 12/5/2013

    " Literary classic. The novel is a great work of art but is of even greater symbilic value as the genesis of main stream African Litritaure. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Keyanna Mcgriff | 12/3/2013

    " This is a book of aquired taste first and for most. The story isn't completely horrible, but I was not a fan of this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alicia | 7/11/2012

    " Wonderful writing and a moving story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christina Castelli | 10/4/2011

    " Read it. You won't regret it--during or after. It's not one of those classics that is difficult to read, and it launched and entire undiscovered genre--Postcolonial or World English novels--onto the Anglophone stage. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nicole-pickens | 8/26/2011

    " I had to read this book in college. I didn't love it but I didn't hate it completely, either. It was enlightening as it showed the tension of European colonization for the natives in an Africa village. I learned alot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chad Oakley | 8/12/2011

    " Something I would've hated in high school/pre2001 but absolutely loved now that I'm appreciative of other cultures. Notice how all three parts are written differently in terms of style. Another perspective on colonialism! Heartbreaking! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mallory | 5/4/2011

    " I did not enjoy this book at all "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Yun Zhen | 3/14/2011

    " You know the author has succeeded when you feel the same indignation against the white colonial imperialists. It isn't a story of blame but a story of the clash of different cultures and the forced imposition of one on the other. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aneta | 1/1/2011

    " The ending was a bit dramatic, but added in a meaningful way. However, the detailing of the book was much of a bore to me. It was an okay read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bonnie B | 2/7/2010

    " I can see why people like it - just not my style of book "

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About the Author
Author Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe (1930–2013) was a prominent Nigerian writer who is famous for his novels describing the effects of Western customs and values on traditional African society. His satire and keen ear for spoken language made him one of the most highly esteemed African writers in English. He published novels, essay collections, poetry, short stories, and juvenile fiction. Among his works are Things Fall Apart, Anthills of the Savannah, A Man of the People, Arrow of God, and the notable collections Morning Yet on Creation Day and Hopes and Impediments. A recipient of the Man Booker International Prize, he was the Charles P. Stevenson Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

About the Narrator

Peter Francis James is an accomplished actor on both the stage and the screen. His theater credits include roles in On Golden Pond, Much Ado about Nothing, and August Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean. His many film and television credits include Jahfree Neema in Oz, Raymond Parks in The Rosa Parks Story, Joe Gould’s Secret, The Guiding Light, Law & Order: SVU, and Third Watch. James’ audiobook narration has won him nine AudioFile Earphones Awards.