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Download The Youngest Science: Notes of a Medicine Watcher Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Youngest Science: Notes of a Medicine Watcher (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Lewis Thomas
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (188 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Lewis Thomas Narrator: George Guidall Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2011 ISBN:
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In this partially autobiographical work, best-selling author Lewis Thomas offers insights on subjects as wide-ranging as gender differences, how it feels to be a patient, human vs. computer intelligence, the future of cancer research, and the longevity of the planet - interspersing all with charming anecdotes about his family, his colleagues and himself.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Spencer | 12/11/2013

    " A journal-like commentary on the state of medicine past, present, and future. It's funny because his comments in 1975 about the state of medicine are just as accurate if made today. A great read. My favorite chapter is his praise of the nursing profession. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cristi | 12/1/2013

    " Very fascinating essays on his career as a physician and microbiologist from 1930 to late 1980s - a time when scientific discoveries transformed medicine and health. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charles | 7/18/2013

    " Lewis thomas is certainly one of our best science essayists. I always enjoy his work. These are general essays mostly, about biology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Grace | 7/10/2013

    " An inspiring book for all the medical types, and I LOVED it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lafe | 5/20/2013

    " A really great book about medicine in the last century. It is written in a conversational tone. It is great for anyone wanting to learn more about medicine and read a great book. It is now one of my favorite books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard Cytowic | 4/27/2013

    " A master of the personal essay. Evocative of medicine as practiced in his father's era (1910) and his own (1937 forward). He laments, as do I, the loss of the physician's physical touch. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki | 4/20/2013

    " I know I read this and I remember that I liked it, but I would need to read it again to accurately review it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel Hooker | 11/5/2012

    " A classic. Great read from the one of the early fathers of medicine writing "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rae | 9/30/2012

    " Intriguing essays on science and how it relates to everyday life and the medical world. I love the way Thomas writes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Courtney Handermann | 9/23/2012

    " Lewis Thomas does what no science class I've ever taken could do -- he makes me like science. Especially appreciated the stories from his own and his father's experiences in medicine. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristina | 9/17/2012

    " All three Thomas books are apologies for meaning to be found in creation. Sadly, the author falls short of tying that back to God. Nevertheless, he comes so close, and his explanation is beautiful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 2/24/2012

    " Thomas goes between being fun, biographical, interesting, and scientific all over the place. It feels like a series of essays rather than a woven piece, but not without originality. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jean | 2/22/2012

    " Really a series of essays, that follow Dr. Thomas' life in medicine and its evolution from hand-holding to scientific care, sometimes unfortunately at the expense of dehumanizing the patient even more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brittany Petruzzi | 12/5/2011

    " More good stuff from Thomas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Comis | 11/1/2011

    " Great book on the not-so-distant attempts of modern day (witch) doctors to understand the inner essences of all things somatic. Pretty interesting stuff at the end there on Lewis' attempts to understand the root causes of cancer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anastasia | 9/29/2011

    " Interesting accounts of discovery and failure in academic medicine in New York City as it evolved from an art to a science. Particulary interesting to those who trained at the institutions mentioned: NYU Bellevue, Cornell, Rockefeller, etc. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jean | 7/31/2011

    " Really a series of essays, that follow Dr. Thomas' life in medicine and its evolution from hand-holding to scientific care, sometimes unfortunately at the expense of dehumanizing the patient even more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel | 2/1/2011

    " A classic. Great read from the one of the early fathers of medicine writing "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Courtney | 11/30/2010

    " Lewis Thomas does what no science class I've ever taken could do -- he makes me like science. Especially appreciated the stories from his own and his father's experiences in medicine.

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anastasia | 11/13/2010

    " Interesting accounts of discovery and failure in academic medicine in New York City as it evolved from an art to a science. Particulary interesting to those who trained at the institutions mentioned: NYU Bellevue, Cornell, Rockefeller, etc. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard | 8/7/2010

    " A master of the personal essay. Evocative of medicine as practiced in his father's era (1910) and his own (1937 forward). He laments, as do I, the loss of the physician's physical touch. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki | 7/25/2010

    " I know I read this and I remember that I liked it, but I would need to read it again to accurately review it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Spencer | 5/3/2009

    " A journal-like commentary on the state of medicine past, present, and future. It's funny because his comments in 1975 about the state of medicine are just as accurate if made today. A great read. My favorite chapter is his praise of the nursing profession. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 3/16/2009

    " Great book on the not-so-distant attempts of modern day (witch) doctors to understand the inner essences of all things somatic. Pretty interesting stuff at the end there on Lewis' attempts to understand the root causes of cancer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charles | 7/18/2008

    " Lewis thomas is certainly one of our best science essayists. I always enjoy his work. These are general essays mostly, about biology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Grace | 3/24/2007

    " An inspiring book for all the medical types, and I LOVED it. "

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About the Author
Author Lewis Thomas

Lewis Thomas (1913–1993) was born in New York. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Princeton and a doctorate in medicine in 1937. He went on to become professor of pediatric research at the University of Minnesota, chairman of the Departments of Pathology and Medicine and also dean at the New York University—Bellevue Medical Center, chairman of the Department of Pathology and dean at Yale Medical School, and president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. His now classic book, The Lives of a Cell, won the National Book Award in 1974.

About the Narrator

George Guidall, winner of eighty-eight AudioFile Earphones Awards, has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for Excellence in Audiobook Narration. In 2014 the Audio Publishers Association presented him with the Special Achievement Award for an audiobook narrator of exceptional stature and accomplishment. During his thirty-year recording career he has recorded over 1,100 audiobooks, won multiple awards, been a mentor to many narrators, and shown by example the potential of fine storytelling. Among Guidall’s narration achievements are Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, and John Irving’s A Widow for One Year, which earned him an Audie Award for best unabridged narration of a novel, an honor he captured again for his rendition of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True. Guidall’s forty-year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie Award for best performance off Broadway, and frequent television appearances.