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Download The World Is Flat: Further Updated and Expanded Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The World Is Flat: Further Updated and Expanded Audiobook, by Thomas L. Friedman
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (43,448 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas L. Friedman Narrator: Oliver Wyman Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2007 ISBN:
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With the flattening of the globe, has the world gotten too small and too fast for human beings and their political systems to adjust in a stable manner? Now in a third edition with a new preface, Friedman's account of the flattening of the earth is a modern classic. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rob Sobalvarro | 2/17/2014

    " Read only the original edition in 2005 in high school! Even though I still had no idea what globalization of business meant, I thought it took a pretty laid back approach to explaining everything. If you're a fan of complex ideas/phenomena but need someone to "Explain it Like I'm 5 Years Old," this book is a great introduction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cole Schoolland | 2/8/2014

    " Incredible author! Most poignant theory since 'Clash of Civilizations' "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rieta Ganas | 2/2/2014

    " An extremely apt title, it explains the functioning of the technological world today. Some great insights into what is actually taking place in the world especially "while we are sleeping". Revolutionises your thinking and makes you wnat to get up and become a part of this "new"world we are living and operating in. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melanie Witte | 1/26/2014

    " All in all it was okay. I read it a few years late to really find it insightful or groundbreaking, but it's overall point remains true. In order to survive, you must be able to adapt; and in an information sharing society, value comes from what only you can produce. Significant value comes from ideas and creativity, not from the ability to 'plug and chug,' no matter how complicated the equation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Neil Fitzgerald | 1/18/2014

    " Once I got past the dry history of how the computer and Internet were invented, reading The Earth is Flat turned out to be a life changer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alan Wayman | 1/12/2014

    " This book gives you a good insight how the world is more and more connected and competitive. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 terpkristin | 1/9/2014

    " I liked the idea of this book, and Friedman's premise was solid, but it was too repetitive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marion | 1/5/2014

    " I have been an at home mom for much if not all this revolution so listening to this in my car was mind blowing. It really is amazing the changes the world is going through. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sean Vangordon | 10/4/2013

    " Very important book to understand international trade and globilization "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kw Estes | 8/19/2013

    " Couldn't get past page 100. Sorry, Tommy old boy, we're just going to have to agree to disagree. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jchung7 | 7/15/2013

    " Not very interesting. The subjects that Friedman tackles on globalization have all been covered by other authors in more detail and with better writing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Unicorn | 6/2/2013

    " Although I found Friedman's concepts and anecdotes interesting, the newspaper-writing style and repetition mock the erudite reader. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rnlockett | 5/30/2013

    " I never could buy into the premise, and it was very weakly supported. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 4/28/2013

    " I remember the beginning of this being rather tedious, as a person who read Thomas Friedman's columns regularly. A rehash of stories he had already told. But about the quarter pole it took off as he started knitting together things I had not heard before into his thesis. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chris Lu | 12/17/2012

    " Makes his claim in the first 20 pgs of the novel, and nothing really new comes about afterwards. Plus, his theory is not that revolutionary. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Juan Vitali | 12/17/2012

    " Overblown , stating of the obvious. A blow hard without the requisite credentials to even talk about this subject "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rita Augusto | 10/13/2012

    " Interesting but a little boring to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mae Angelique | 9/15/2012

    " very informative. liked it :) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ivis García | 7/15/2012

    " While this book is overly-simplistic to the point of absurdity, it perhaps deserves at least some credit because, indeed, it is a book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Edmonson | 12/23/2011

    " Communications and information technology make it easier for countries to do business beyond their own borders and thus levels the business playing field for many. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geertvanderzalm | 12/20/2011

    " Very interesting book, but a little bit too long. After a while, you get the point, but the book goes on for x more pages. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aspasia | 11/8/2011

    " Friedman tells us how globalization has taken over the worls, the pros and cons to globalization, and offers a wake up call to parents, educators, and legislators about preparing our kids to compete for jobs. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Warren | 8/26/2011

    " Good concept, lots of blather. Could have been half as long. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tara | 5/9/2011

    " The future is bright. A cool summary of where we have been, where we are and where we are going all thanks to the internet. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ebersmoll | 5/1/2011

    " I brought it because i loved his "From Beirut to Jerusalem". I am expecting the same narrative here. It is more or less working good till now, but he should not have got in to explaining AJAX and Netscape. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mimi | 4/23/2011

    " Need to read it again for everything to sink in. Enjoy his style. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 4/19/2011

    " Very interesting stuff. I like Friedman's ideas, but the book seemed to go on and on.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ginny | 4/14/2011

    " A good read about how globalization has occurred in the 21st century - who knew the Postal Service could fix computers instead of sending them to computer companies? (This kid at least didn't.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 4/1/2011

    " THE MUST READS OF THIS TIME "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sebastiano | 3/25/2011

    " Change the way I think about the world today. "

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About the Author
Author Thomas L. Friedman

Thomas L. Friedman was UPI's Beirut correspondent from 1979 to 1981. In 1982, he became the New York Times Beirut bureau chief, winning a 1983 Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. In 1984, he moved to Jerusalem as the Times bureau chief, and in 1988 won a second Pulitzer Prize for reporting. He is also the author of the national bestseller The Lexus and the Olive Tree. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for his work on this book. He lives in Washington with his family.

About the Narrator

Oliver Wyman is an actor and award-winning audiobook narrator. His first full-length audiobook, It’s Not about the Bike, won an Audie Award. Quickly renowned for his versatility, he went on to win several Audie Awards and seventeen AudioFile Earphones Awards in genres ranging from drama and humor to nonfiction and children’s stories.