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Download The Voyage of the Beagle Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Voyage of the Beagle Audiobook, by Charles Darwin
4.21 out of 54.21 out of 54.21 out of 54.21 out of 54.21 out of 5 4.21 (28 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Charles Darwin Narrator: John Franklyn-Robbins Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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Charles Darwin was appointed naturalist aboard the H.M.S. Beagle, which left England in 1831 to map the coast of South America and then circumnavigate the globe. As Darwin explored, he came to dispute the idea that catastrophic upheaval created mountains and shaped the earth - and if geological change came slowly, could not living species also evolve the same way? As his journey continued to the Galapagos Islands, New Zealand, and Australia, his theories crystallized. Returning to England in 1836, he published his journal. It became an immediate best seller and a classic of natural history. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristin | 2/15/2014

    " In the first one hundred pages of the Voyage of the Beagle Charles Darwin is writing a journal about his encounters and discoveries of visiting multiple islands and countries while satisfying his curiosity by exploring everything that would make him wonder. He filled the journal with his questions, observations, experiments, and helpful facts from either him or other people. The book also provided diagrams to help the readers visualize the things he saw. Throughout the book he describes the thing he see with incredible detail, and for all the places he visits he observes everything from the smallest insects to the most intriguing cuttlefish. Although this book is very interesting I feel that Charles Darwin likes to add an excessive amount of detail. To describe my favorite part, when he was exploring the diodon, he almost wrote two pages to describe it's actions and colors. For the diodon he got into so much detail I felt like I had seen it myself. Not only does Charles Darwin examine animals he also looks at the different lifestyles between each region. Charles Darwin seemed to enjoy comparing and contrasting the ways of different regions compared to him. The most commonly mentioned things when it comes to people are what they eat, what is considered proper manners, they're prior knowledge, and how they hunt. Even though Charles Darwin is a journalist he adds a hint of humor by mentioning how he fell off his horse while just mindlessly twirling a different kind of lasso in the air. Not only does he talk about living things he also tells us of the siliceous tube that lightening makes when it strikes loose sand. He also mentions the shape of the land and refers to the Rio Negro as a very broad river, and says the soil around it is gravelly and infertile. For the last portion of the last few pages he continues mentioning the quadrupeds of south Africa and continues describing the way birds work to raise their young such as the cuckoo bird laying eggs in other bird's nests to cocks who have about twenty to thirty eggs in each nest. Through these one hundred pages I learned everything Charles Darwin had learned too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyson | 2/13/2014

    " There is a reason I love Darwin about as much as life itself...monumental scientific and philosophical achievements aside, his journals have an electrifying undercurrent of wonder and humor that make me proud to be a scientist, a naturalist, and a writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ubaid Dhiyan | 2/10/2014

    " An absolutely delightful work that provides insight into the powerful mind of one of history's greatest scientists/naturalists. Highly recommended. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 2/9/2014

    " Incredibly easy to read (surprising to me). Although I'm actually listening to it on CD on the 15 min commute! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 raul | 1/25/2014

    " I have an old colonial binding of this book titled Darwin's Journal of a Voyage round the World. It's a slightly different edit than the Voyage of the Beagle but it's taken from the same source material. This is not adventure writing, it's the writing of a scientist trying to understand a world that is largely new and foreign to him. The scope is vast, the observation is dry, but keen and humble. The book is also a fascinating window onto the observation that led to the Origin of the Species a few years later. An important and interesting book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amerynth | 1/20/2014

    " If you enjoy natural history, you'll find Darwin's account of his five-year journey around the globe in "The Voyage of the Beagle" both accessible and interesting. His trip is recounted in exhaustive detail -- which I found really enjoyable when he was writing about a subject I was interested in and somewhat tedious when he was talking about geology, which I don't much care for reading about. The most enjoyable part of the book was the account of Jemmy Button, York Minster and Fuegia Basket, natives of Tierra del Fuego who were brought to live in England and then brought back home, followed by accounts of South American animals and plants. (Having read "Uttermost Part of the Earth" previously, it was fun to see another account of their trip.) Overall, the book is a fascinating look at the early exploration that helped shape Darwin's theory of evolution. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barry | 1/18/2014

    " Full of curious and singular facts, and the presence of a great observational mind. It really was a remarkable journey for Darwin, and through him, for the world and for history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug Thayer | 1/10/2014

    " What an interesting read. It is a travelogue, history book, science journal and an adventure story in one. If you like Josh Sloacum, you will love this book. Darwin was such an inquisitive and keenly observant person. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anthony | 1/5/2014

    " A spectacularly compelling travelogue. Cruise the southern hemisphere as it once was with one of the most astute, humble, wide-eyed observers in recent history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Bird | 1/3/2014

    " Darwin shows in this book the sort of wonder at the world that makes one understand how he was able to come up with what is perhaps the most important scientific insight ever. It is charming and delightful, and endlessly curious. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rika | 12/17/2013

    " Okay, I didn't completely finish it.... yet... but it's really quite fascinating! His perspective on race relations in South America was particularly illuminating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kev | 12/9/2013

    " A colleague I consider to be one the smartest guys I know recommended this to me & I just heeded his advice. I'm so happy I did. Classic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charles | 11/11/2013

    " This not only has great science in it, but reads a bit like an adventure novel in places. Just a fantastic view into the world of the time and to the voyage that changed Darwin's life and gave him so much food for thought in his development of natural selection. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sprocket Doggingsworth | 7/9/2013

    " I found this one downright clever, and enlightening to see the personal side of what lead Darwin to his conclusions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dean | 8/29/2012

    " One can almost see the germ of his theory develop as he travels down the east coast of South America and up the west coast. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kaeru | 5/4/2012

    " Wonderful, wonderful, real life adventure. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Velvetink | 2/13/2012

    " I have the everyman 1945 Hardcover Edition. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bakul | 7/19/2011

    " I tried to read the original, but gave up. This abridged and illustrated book edited by Millicent Selsam was just the thing to read as I was gtting ready fro my trip to Patagonia. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sam Mciver | 5/16/2011

    " A bit too much for me when I had it, would like to try again one day. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 3/9/2011

    " Very Interesting and erudite!
    I am glad I finally got around to reading it.
    What an amazing circumnavigation of the globe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jetreno | 2/5/2011

    " I loved this book. It made science so easy. And Darwin was amazing to be able to find all
    of the information and classify it, etc. Sometimes a bit wordy but worth every word. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug | 1/10/2011

    " What an interesting read. It is a travelogue, history book, science journal and an adventure story in one. If you like Josh Sloacum, you will love this book. Darwin was such an inquisitive and keenly observant person. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyson | 12/22/2010

    " There is a reason I love Darwin about as much as life itself...monumental scientific and philosophical achievements aside, his journals have an electrifying undercurrent of wonder and humor that make me proud to be a scientist, a naturalist, and a writer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dayna | 12/8/2010

    " It was interesting to read just how intelligent Darwin was. Besides being a biologist and studying the effects of natural selection on finches in the Galapagos, he studied geology, paleontology, and botany. While his written is the easiest to read, it is fascinating. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jessica | 11/1/2010

    " Okay... truthfully... it was really boring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colleen | 7/28/2010

    " it is one of The Great Writers Library, and is my reading for the month, in our local book club. It is a privately owned collection and each member has selected one to read for the month. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin | 7/8/2010

    " That although this isbn come up as a hardcover, it is a paperback. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 2/24/2010

    " Incredibly easy to read (surprising to me). Although I'm actually listening to it on CD on the 15 min commute! "

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About the Author
Author Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin (1809–1882) was an English naturalist and the first evolutionary biologist, best known for his controversial and groundbreaking The Origin of Species. He introduced the concept of natural selection, marking a new epoch in the scientific world. The importance of his work was well recognized by his contemporaries; he was elected to the Royal Society and the French Academy of Sciences and was also honored by burial in Westminster Abbey after he died.

About the Narrator

John Franklyn-Robbins (1924–2009) was an English character actor of stage and screen. A prolific Shakespearean actor, he trained at RADA and proceeded to work at the Manchester Library Theatre and the Bristol Old Vic early in his career. He played a diverse number of roles ranging from Ariel in The Tempest to Macduff in Macbeth. His prestigious stage career included stints in both the West End and Broadway. He also worked for both the BBC and ITV in their early formative years and went on to appear in such classic television series as The Avengers, The Baron, Z-Cars, Callan, I, Claudius, Doctor Who and Star Trek: The Next Generation.