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Download The Very Best of Mark Twain Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Very Best of Mark Twain Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,298 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Frank Lovejoy, Jackie Cooper Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2010 ISBN:
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A selection of Mark Twain's best work, including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer', 'The Jumping Frog of Calaveras County', and 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'.

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Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Bob Lake | 2/20/2014

    " Boring quit at the half point. What a waste of time and money. Don't buy it, its not what it sounds like. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janetiokepa | 2/20/2014

    " The work done by the editors is incredible, but it's Samuel Clemens who makes me love this book. I hate to wait five years for Volume 2! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hank | 2/9/2014

    " The Reader's Edition is a must read for almost everyone who ever enjoyed this author. The 'Complete' edition with a lot of additional material from the editor is probably not for everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lilly-Anne | 2/5/2014

    " Wonderfully entertaining. Skip the first 100 pages and get right to the biography. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barry | 1/6/2014

    " This edition of Mark Twain's autobiography is both the author's book and a scholarly work. It is intended for more than a lover of the works of the author, and at times the long academic introduction tries the patience of the reader - unless he/she is a professor of American literature. I appreciate the considerable effort this book required, so one must take my remarks with a grain of salt. As a student of American lit, I wanted to hear the uncensored voice of Twain, and it comes through wonderfully. The academic commentary is valuable, but not vital to more casual readers, who can peruse parts of the introduction before diving into the book. However, at times in the book the editor's background analysis is truly helpful. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Realestatedad | 1/6/2014

    " I've tried to finish this tome a number of times and I get derailed by boredom and thoughts of having my eyes lasered. Twain's wit and humor are interupted by long tails of people and places you don't care about, much like the neighbor lady who tries to corner us on our walks. We would rather go four blocks out of the way than be polite and I think I'm done being polite to this book. To think this but volume 1 . . . Happy Reading! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason | 1/5/2014

    " I listened to it and the introduction was really boring. I recommend that you skip it. My favorite sections were when he talks about the German language and when he discusses an "editor's" notes on a paper about Joan of Arc. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela D | 12/26/2013

    " It's a bit of a challenge, due to the sheer size of this tome, to get into. Will need to have another go at reading it when I am not so busy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Badinia | 12/3/2013

    " I would love to explain to Mark Twain, former riverboat worker, that I am reading his latest book on a kindle. The mind boggles. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 11/28/2013

    " Very funny autobiography that was an excellent telling from typical autobiographies. I think he wanted to wait this long because nobody will be able to say what parts are fiction. Quite the interesting man. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wrdwrrior Lehr | 9/13/2013

    " Couldn't bring myself to do 800 pages of random thoughts. He is witty, but not that much! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Georgia | 8/16/2013

    " When the book was first released, I was very excited to delve into his history. There was much humor, but there were other times I was just plain bored. Glad I read it, though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Larryfrost8 | 7/24/2013

    " All you wanted to know about 19th century america that you didn't know you wanted to know. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Gray | 2/16/2013

    " What's not to like... okay, perhaps some of the academic analysis gets to be a bit much but reading Twain with context is a joy. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alyson | 8/8/2012

    " Couldn't finish - sorry, Mark! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Kissell | 9/28/2010

    " This reads like being in the room with a fascinating storyteller! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt Garden | 7/6/2010

    " This had a lot of very entertaining and interesting parts, but it could be slow at times, too. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.