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Download The Trillion Dollar Meltdown: Easy Money, High Rollers, and the Great Credit Crash Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Trillion Dollar Meltdown: Easy Money, High Rollers, and the Great Credit Crash (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Charles R. Morris
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (467 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Charles R. Morris Narrator: Nick Summers Publisher: Phoenix Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2008 ISBN:
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The sub-prime mortgage crisis is only the beginning; a more profound economic and political restructuring is on its way.

According to Charles R. Morris, the astronomical leverage at investment banks, with their hedge-fund and private-equity clients, virtually guarantees massive disruption in global markets. A quarter century of free-market zealotry that extolled asset striping, abusive lending, and hedge-fund secrecy will come crashing down with it.

The Trillion Dollar Meltdown explains how we got here, and what is about to happen. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob Norton | 2/16/2014

    " This guy nailed it, apparently before it all happened, but certainly after. His insight into how we got into this mess is nearly perfect. If you want to know what happened with the banks, the broader financial services industry, and our economy in 2007 - 20??, I recommend reading this book first. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leslie | 2/12/2014

    " Published in February 2008, this is a great analysis of how we got where we are economically, with a conclusion that the markets having over-deregulated now need to reregulate. In the afterword, the author mentions that the free-market mania that has led the country astray has also destroyed healthcare availability for many Americans. I highly recommend this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lucas | 2/12/2014

    " Morris doesn't bother to explain most of the more obscure terms and processes, so the about a third of the book was unintelligible to me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 2/11/2014

    " Basically the what, when, where, why and how of our current economy. Mr Morris runs the gamut from current account deficits and exchange rates to financial regulation and the government to sub-prime loans and credit default swaps, as well as providing some suggestions for where we go from here. It is readable without much of an Economics or Finance background as Mr Morris provides a lot of explanations, though some parts were challenging for me and my background is in Economics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ron Davison | 1/31/2014

    " Essentially explains (and predicts, given it was written about a year ago) the current financial crash. Oddest fact from the book? US Economy is about $14 trillion. The world economy is about $54 trillion. Value of financial derivatives before this meltdown began? $500 trillion. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marty | 1/30/2014

    " Morris gets points for being the first out of the blocks, but therein lies the central weakness of his book: he's attempting to tell the story of the meltdown before the crisis has reached its apogee and long before the political actors have started reckoning with the scary realities presented by the near total collapse of the global financial system. My advice: wait for the second edition. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deborah Ebbeling | 1/18/2014

    " Well written. Heavy read, but I found it to be quite informative and eye-opening. I think all of our kids should be forced to read this book :$ "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Simmoril | 1/9/2014

    " A good summary and analysis of the current credit crisis, as well as various important events in US economic history that led up to it. Although well-written, my lack of background in finance made it somewhat difficult for me to follow along. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Douglas O'roark | 1/2/2014

    " Based on the source (to the right), a strong argument that we have reached the extreme of unregulated markets introduced during the Reagan administration. Tell Steve Forbes not all regulation is bad. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bridget | 10/22/2013

    " Basic, quick read of the current economic crisis. A bit outdated but gives some helpful background. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Arvind Rao | 8/25/2013

    " Want to get a handle on the crap going around u - do read . Need to get back to reading Liars Poker and Den of Thieves again . Sounds very familiar "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alex | 7/31/2013

    " Excellent book about the current financial crisis. Well-written and very to the point. In parts, it can get a bit bogged down in a few confusing details about different financial transactions, etc. but not too bad. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jenna | 5/25/2013

    " I'm attempting to understand what happened, and my conclusion is that it's way over my head (and I did give up after half way through). My friend lent me this book ... we may part ways when it comes to enthusiasm over following the market. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ethan | 12/23/2012

    " A first attempt to document the years of ignorance and greed that led to the current economic crisis. A lot went over my head, but what I understood was well thought out, and some of the explanations definitely helped in my understanding. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Al | 5/3/2012

    " Great overview of the credit crisis - how we got here and some ideas for where to go in the future. Well-written, crisp and informative. I feel much better about my financial future having read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 4/30/2012

    " Reading for the second time.... Mind bendingly complicated "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen Shanley | 1/4/2012

    " very very interesting. there were a lot of concepts that were hard to comprehend for a financial layperson, so i was left with a lot of questions, but certainly took a lot away from it. Really fascinating stuff. scary how ignorant i am of the complex world of finance! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jose | 12/2/2011

    " First half of the book is very readable, then frankly it could be that I am too tired at night, but it gets a little obtruse, which is probably a root cause of all that went wrong with the economy leading to the present financial crisis. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alan Macomber | 7/11/2011

    " The fastest book out on the subject of the great credit meltdown. Good writing and informative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peter | 6/25/2011

    " Imagine Galbraith's "The Great Crash" written before the crash was done and you have this book. I read it in a day. You will thrill at the ways people have invented to screw each other over, and make lots of money for nothing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ganeshram | 12/7/2010

    " OK book. Of the 4 financial books I read this year, this is the most forgettable one, since I don't remember the contents of the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ajsf | 11/24/2010

    " great, short book. thank god it's short b/c you have re-read a lot of it in order to understand all the crazy sh-t the financial world has come up with. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Oldesq | 10/10/2010

    " Clear and detailed explanations about the origins of the Great Recession although at a time before some of the biggest waves hit shore. Understandable discussions about CMO, CDO, tranche divisons and collateralization risks. A good primer if a bit dated. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Simmoril | 8/14/2010

    " A good summary and analysis of the current credit crisis, as well as various important events in US economic history that led up to it. Although well-written, my lack of background in finance made it somewhat difficult for me to follow along. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Havi | 7/7/2010

    " Very readable account of the crazy financial system of the last thirty years. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lucas | 5/31/2010

    " Morris doesn't bother to explain most of the more obscure terms and processes, so the about a third of the book was unintelligible to me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 11/1/2009

    " very very interesting. there were a lot of concepts that were hard to comprehend for a financial layperson, so i was left with a lot of questions, but certainly took a lot away from it. Really fascinating stuff. scary how ignorant i am of the complex world of finance! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bridget | 7/26/2009

    " Basic, quick read of the current economic crisis. A bit outdated but gives some helpful background. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greg | 7/15/2009

    " Good overview of how we got into the mortage crisis, but there were too many complex financial instruments to really understand. He assumes you have a certain depth of knowledge for complex finance instruments. "

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About the Author

Charles R. Morris has written a dozen books, including The Coming Global Boom, a New York Times Notable Book of 1990; The Tycoons, a Barron’s Best Book of 2005; and The Trillion Dollar Meltdown, a New York Times bestseller. He is a lawyer and former investment banker, and his articles and reviews have appeared in many publications, including the Atlantic, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.