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Download The Suspicions of Mr Whicher Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Suspicions of Mr Whicher (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Kate Summerscale
3.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 5 3.15 (34 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Kate Summerscale Narrator: Christian Rhodska Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN:
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It is midnight on 30th June 1860 and all is quiet in the Kent family house in Road, Wiltshire. The next morning they wake to find that their youngest son has been the victim of an unimaginably gruesome murder. Even worse, the guilty party is surely one of their number - the house was bolted from the inside.

As Jack Whicher, the most celebrated detective of his day, arrives to track down the killer, the murder provokes national hysteria. This true story is the original Victorian whodunit. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ti-Leigh Telford | 2/12/2014

    " This was amazing. Especially since when I finished I'm still not sure I know what happened. I loved how the author connected the true story with all the detective fiction being written at the time. Her afterword was touching. I found myself forgetting that a 3 year old sweet little boy had been murdered and dumped in an outhouse. Despicable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelsey | 1/27/2014

    " A great story about the mystery at Road House in the 1800's as well as the history of the development of Scotland Yard, real detectives, and investigation. Worth the read! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 1/21/2014

    " Summerscale's book is an enjoyable look at one of the original Victorian crimes that helped spawn the detective genre in fiction. Fans of Sherlock Holmes and historical mysteries should enjoy this detailed examinations of the Road Hill House murder and its aftermath. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clbplym | 1/18/2014

    " I really enjoyed this and wanted to keep reading to find out who had done it. I found the historical references fascinating and especially the way real life detectives were reflected in Victorian fiction. Would have been 4 stars but the last third of the book wasn't as good. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Luke433 | 1/15/2014

    " Quite disappointed with this book, expected a the recounting of this incident and subsequent investigation to give one a real sense of the people involved but never got any insight. The reviews I'd read misled me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Graham Whatley | 1/14/2014

    " Shit book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Murray | 1/11/2014

    " interesting read, "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Liz Gil | 1/7/2014

    " Interesting and well researched, but super repetitive. As a mystery lover, I liked learning about the origin of detectives and detective novels, but I got bored with the book and thought it dragged on. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Thecounselor | 1/4/2014

    " It's decent, but there are better books out there. I had high hopes after the author said he wrote the book like a detective story, but alas, it wasn't to be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kim Smith | 12/27/2013

    " Great history book of the time period and the beginnings of detective work. Interesting but sometimes hard to follow. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Callum Beardmore | 12/22/2013

    " Despite it's awfully quick ending - oh by the way this person was involved - and simplistic style, I found this to be a enrapturing and compulsive read. Worth a look, although nothing to write home about. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Don Walker | 12/20/2013

    " An excellent book by a British journalist about a murder that was a sensation in 19th century England. It gave birth to the first true detective novel by Wilkie Collins. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 12/19/2013

    " This book is quite interesting if one enjoys English history, and in particular, history of detectives and the detective novel. This is NOT a novel! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaine Cahill | 12/2/2013

    " Really liked this book as it gives you a great insight into the history of our modern day detective. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sallie | 11/25/2013

    " Though weighed down by some unnecessary detail, I found this to be an engaging analysis of a Victorian murder. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Curlyhair | 8/16/2013

    " Wasn't sure what this would be like, but I was hooked early on. A really well written book, written to keep you interested in the subject matter "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsten | 8/13/2013

    " I enjoyed this look back at a Victorian murder and the culture of press coverage, public fascination, and the mythology of the Great Detective that the case launched. Well done. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tonya | 6/25/2012

    " This book moved a bit too slowly. The historical information should have been interesting, but it just seemed to drag down the story line. A good effort, but not quite an engaging enough voice. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Janis Gilbert | 5/13/2012

    " A true mystery about Mr. Whicher, the first Scotland Yard dective inspector and his case about the Samuel Kent family. His son of three was murdered and found at the bottom of an outdoor privy, his throat cut. About a respectable middle class Victorian family and the case and trial. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel Jones | 8/8/2011

    " Wow, when Victorians go bad! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cerys | 5/20/2011

    " A fascinating account of a Victorian murder and an examination of the rise of the detective. A great read which kept me engaged to the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Darbi | 5/6/2011

    " I'm actually listening to this on my iPod when I run... does that count? : )... It was okay "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diana | 4/30/2011

    " This book's greatest virtue is creating a sort of etymology for the modern detective story. Anyone who loves mysteries - especially good British detective novels - will find this book enriching. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 4/27/2011

    " Fascinating - reveals another aspect of Victorian life and it's criminal underbelly. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 John | 4/25/2011

    " Very dull telling of a quite interesting story. I hope the tv version is more entertaining. Finishing this book was very difficult. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maureen | 4/4/2011

    " This book, like the real-life murder investigation it takes as its subject, starts off with great drama and excitement, then loses its way halfway through. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Henley | 4/3/2011

    " Book Club rating - 3.5 "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mari Anne | 4/1/2011

    " Dull, dull, dull. Couldn't get through it. I had read somewhere that this was a really interesting book but I didn't find it to be so. Minute detail made it painful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren | 3/28/2011

    " Not the best true crime book I've read. I felt like the book could use more description of events related to the case or just be shorter. It had a lot of mostly unnecessary references to detective stories/novels of the Victorian era. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maureen | 3/26/2011

    " Quite a tale of a murder that gripped England as the U.S. was busy descending into Civil War. The role of the press in identifying suspects is particularly interesting, but overall I found it a slow read, with digressions into places I didn't want to go. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kiersten | 3/23/2011

    " In between the large chunks of irrelevant details and the poorly organized information is an interesting story...just not told very well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom | 3/17/2011

    " Pretty good book. Offers a lot of historical context and describes a real murder investigation in 1860. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerry | 3/13/2011

    " This is the way I need to read nonfiction. I really enjoyed this. I will say that there were times that I started to nod off or tune it out because it did get a little bogged down in what I felt were unnecessary details. All in all it was really enjoyable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Denise | 2/28/2011

    " I love almost anything like a historical biography. This was a good book I simply hard a time trying to get into it. "

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About the Author
Author Kate Summerscale

Kate Summerscale is the former literary editor for the Daily Telegraph and author of The Queen of Whale Cay, which won the Somerset Maugham Award and was shortlisted for the Whitbread biography award. She lives in London.