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Download The Stalin Epigram: A Novel Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Stalin Epigram: A Novel (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Robert Littell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (253 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Robert Littell Narrator: John Lee, Anne Flosnik Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN:
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The Stalin Epigram is a masterful rendering of the life of Osip Mandelstam, one of Russia's greatest poets of the 20th century. His heroic protest against the Stalin regime---particularly his outspoken criticism of the collectivization that drove millions of Russian peasants to starvation---finally reached its apex in 1934. When he composed a searing indictment of Stalin in a 16-line poem, secretly passed from person to person through recitation, the poet was arrested. It is widely accepted that Stalin himself was directly involved in Mandelstam's exile and his death in a Siberian transit camp in 1938.

A master of historical detail and cultural authenticity, best-selling author Robert Littell based this novel in part on a memorable, intimate meeting with Mandelstam's wife in 1979. Narrated by Mandelstam's wife, his friends Boris Pasternak and Anna Akhmatova, and Mandelstam himself, this lucid account of the relationships between the artists, politicians, and proletariat of Stalinist Russia is an astounding moment in history brought to life by a perceptive, immensely talented writer. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gail | 2/18/2014

    " This novel about the life of the Russian poet Osip Mandenstam was both a gripping story and a close look at the consequences of being an honest and courageous artist in Soviet Russia. The story is told from several points of view, including Osip's devoted wife and his cellmate, a weightlifter/circus strongman. The cruelties that the prisoners were subjected to made me think of the US prison at Guantanemo and hope that we are not practicing similar acts there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Alice | 2/18/2014

    " Novel about the poet Mandelstam. Based on a true incident. Somewhat forgettable. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Fuschia | 2/15/2014

    " Suitably depressing. Felt like I've read (too many) similar stories elsewhere. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan | 1/19/2014

    " I really enjoyed this historical fiction of how a poet is arrested and sent off to work camps in early soviet Russia for writing a poem denouncing Stalin. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eddie | 1/11/2014

    " Poet Mandelstam suffers through the worst of 30's Stalinism "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy | 12/28/2013

    " A poet takes on Stalin and loses. Well-crafted. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Audrey | 12/9/2013

    " Well written from various perspectives, but I wanted to like it more than I did "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Judy | 12/5/2013

    " Historical fiction about the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam and his opposition to Stalin. Told from several points of view from historical and imaginged people. Shows the difficulty of living in such a repressive society. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Trspears42 | 11/27/2013

    " If anyone wants to know what happened when Russians offended Stalin.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carey Combe | 10/18/2013

    " Very good historical fiction with a wonderful cast of characters. It is so readable, sometimes funny and often heartbreaking and if you are interested in reading about Stalin's terror this book brings it brilliantly, vividly and painfully to life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicholas Sauer | 7/1/2013

    " Read it in a day. It was beautiful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shaka Mitchell | 10/3/2012

    " After recently finishing a non-fiction account of Stalin's court (Court of the Red Tsar) this further personalized the Terror from a so-called criminal's perspective. It also shows the naivete that so many had during this time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carl | 5/8/2012

    " Not the usual cold war Spy v. Spy, but an imagined account of true events in USSR in the 30's. Not a gripping plot; some of the stories (the weight lifter) seemed too formulaic, but I think he conveyed some of what it must have been like for various people during that terrible time and place. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Harry | 12/10/2011

    " A bit long but an interesting book. Life in the USSR during the great purge years of the 30s. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Samantha | 9/11/2011

    " Harrowing examination of Stalin's Russia in the 30s. Finished it in a day--narrative structure of switching between narrators keeps the pace going and provides other relevant and interesting viewpoints. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Philipp | 1/13/2011

    " Hier steht der russische Dichter Ossip Mandelstam im Zentrum und ein Epigramm, das er auf den "roten Zaren" geschrieben hat und das ihm zunächst die Verbannung und schließlich den Tod gebracht hat . Eine gute Lektüre. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 T.R. | 11/4/2010

    " Beautiful book about the Gulag. Can you believe it? It's beautiful in a Russian kind of tragic, this isn't going to end well sort of way. Stalin's megalomania and paranoia are up against one of Russia's finest poets. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Harry | 8/13/2010

    " A bit long but an interesting book. Life in the USSR during the great purge years of the 30s. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathryn | 6/19/2010

    " Interesting book about Russia in the 1930's, about the famous Russian poet Mandelstum and how his fatal poem about Stalin met with torture, ostracism, and prison life. The book also included people from other professions, and how the oppressive regime of Stalin affected their lives. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Fuschia | 6/1/2010

    " Suitably depressing. Felt like I've read (too many) similar stories elsewhere. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine | 3/28/2010

    " Not like Littell's other spy novels, this fictionalized account of a poet under Stalin in the 20s and 30s was very well written. I found it hard to read though and struggled at times to finish it, but in the end I'm glad I read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natalie | 3/6/2010

    " This book was enjoyable but not all that I had hoped it would be. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eddie | 3/3/2010

    " Poet Mandelstam suffers through the worst of 30's Stalinism "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sam | 1/16/2010

    " Harrowing examination of Stalin's Russia in the 30s. Finished it in a day--narrative structure of switching between narrators keeps the pace going and provides other relevant and interesting viewpoints. "

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About the Author
Author Robert Littell

Robert Littell’s novels include the New York Times bestseller The Company and many others. A former Newsweek journalist, he makes his home in France.