Extended Audio Sample

Download The Stainless Steel Rat Joins the Circus: Stainless Steel Rat, Book 10 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Stainless Steel Rat Joins the Circus: Stainless Steel Rat, Book 10 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Harry Harrison
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (618 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Harry Harrison Narrator: Phil Gigante Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2011 ISBN:
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Imperetrix Von Kaiser-Czarski is the richest man in the universe, and someone is systematically robbing all of his banks. He decides that the best course of action is to set a thief to catch a thief, and the best thief of them all is one Slippery Jim diGriz. Sceptical at first, Jim is soon won over by the promise of four million credits a day, plus expenses.

Jim and Angelina enlist the help of their twin sons, James and Bolivar, and James' computers soon find the common link between all of the robberies: every time a bank was hit, there was a circus in town. The same circus. What better way to find out about the goings on among circus-folk than to become one of them? And so Slippery Jim becomes master magician Mighty Marvell, and soon discovers that - just like him - everyone isn't quite what they seem.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Simon | 11/20/2013

    " Not as good as I remember them being when I first read the rest of the books. But it was the last one, and I didn't know it existed until now, so it was nice to finish the series with Slippery Jim's final case. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah Sammis | 10/26/2013

    " I liked it only because I'm a fan of the series. It's one of the weakest of the books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jared | 8/28/2012

    " Light fare. Quick read. Kind of fun. No substance. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Max | 4/25/2012

    " you can't go wrong reading about the SSR "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sue-Ellen | 12/29/2011

    " Follows the same style as past stainless steel rat adventures. With a character of very unpredictable actions, the writing style is predictable. But that can be great cause of the feeling like picking up an old friend. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gerd | 6/22/2011

    " I saw the movie "Soylent Green" long before I read the book and thus went in with different expectations on the story. It's a still a great read, but in the end it turns out to be 'only' a futuristic crime novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jordan | 5/16/2011

    " I found this book incredibly depressing. Good, but depressing. Very different from the movie. I'd have to say I prefer the book, but that's probably just my strange bias against Charlton Heston speaking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mandi | 3/29/2011

    " The movie and the book are very different. Don't let the movie hype taint your brain on the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 3/11/2011

    " I really liked the forward thinking of the author regarding overpopulation and the unsustainable situation in which we will (or are now starting to) find ourselves. Unlike in the film, Soylent [Green] is NOT 'people' in the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lois | 3/8/2011

    " I'm not too much of a science fiction fan, but I liked this story.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claire | 1/12/2011

    " A bleak outlook for the world, over populated and under resourced. This story is the basis for the movie Soylent Green, but they are completely different stories, so can't really be compared. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jnyama | 9/15/2010

    " Probably more frightening now, then it was 10 years ago, as we seem to be plummeting headlong back into the same situations that created the dystopia Harrison presents. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gozde | 5/26/2010

    " yazildigi tarihten neredeyse bugünü öngörmüs. o kadar vahim olmasa da çok yaklasmis bir durumda olmamiz ise içler acisi. "

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About the Author
Author Harry Harrison

Harry Harrison (1925-2012) was drafted into the Army after finishing school and served in World War II, where he learned both to shoot guns and repair analogue computers. Leaving the Army at the end of the war, Harrison teamed up with Wally Wood and produced professional comic book art. When the comic book boom came to an end, Harrison moved from drawing to writing. In 1957 his story, “The Stainless Steel Rat” was published in Astounding, and introduced a character which would stay with him (and readers) for the next forty-odd years. In 1975 Harrison had his first brush with Hollywood when his novel, Make Room! Make Room! was used for the basis of Soylent Green. His novels have also been successfully adapted for other media: radio plays and readings, a board game, at least one computer game, and, taking us full-circle, comic books, most notably 2000AD’s adaptations of the Stainless Steel Rat books.

In a career spanning sixty years, Harrison produced more than a hundred short stories, edited over thirty anthologies, and published more than sixty novels.

About the Narrator

Phil Gigante has narrated more than two hundred audiobooks, earning ten AudioFile Earphones Awards and three of the prestigious Audie Awards for best narration. An actor, director, and producer with over twenty years of experience in theater, film, television, and radio, he is currently the artistic director of Gigantic Productions and Little Giant Children’s Theatre.