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Download The Siege of Krishnapur Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Siege of Krishnapur (Unabridged) Audiobook, by J. G. Farrell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,977 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: J. G. Farrell Narrator: Sam Dastor Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2010 ISBN:
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In the Spring of 1857, with India on the brink of a violent and bloody mutiny, Krishnapur is a remote town on the vast North Indian plain. For the British there, life is orderly and genteel.

Then the sepoys at the nearest military cantonment rise in revolt and the British community retreats with shock into the Residency. They prepare to fight for their lives with what weapons they can muster. As food and ammunition grow short, the Residency, its defences battered by shot and shell and eroded by the rains, becomes ever more vulnerable. The Siege of Krishnapur is a modern classic of narrative excitement that also digs deep to explore some fundamental questions of civilisation and life.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 2/17/2014

    " This is an excellent read and captures well the British in India in the nineteenth century with historical accuracy. There is great wit and humour in the book and some genuinely funny moments; however it is also a very brutal book with some grim scenarios. It captures well the British approach to empire in the characters of those caught in the siege and watching their gradual deterioration physically and mentally is fascinating. One of the characters has many antiques and artifacts from the Great Exhibition, which to him represent the future, rationalism and progress. Towards the end of the siege they are broken apart and used as cannon shot to fire at the natives/sepoys; a very clever reflection on modernity and progress. The changing role and perception of the women is very interesting and the futility of religion is well represented by the rather bizarre figure of the padre. A very stimulating read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rishi Garg | 2/15/2014

    " Written like a Victorian novel, I found myself waiting for the climax of the story, and for it to be, finally, some expression of the Indian/sepoy point of view. But instead, I was unsure what point of the novel was the climax and believe that while the British self-reflection on civilization was notable, that a book written in the 1970's and winning the Booker Prize may have included something more than what was traditionally found in 19th century novels. None of the characters were redemptive and it not seem as though they learned anything positive about colonialism from their experience. At any rate, the author is talented, though I feel as though he chose a safer path than he could have. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Pat Stearman | 2/13/2014

    " Gave up on this, too much waffle from the characters, not enough India and hardly any action. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anshuman | 2/2/2014

    " The author had depicted the Indian Mutiny of 1857 and its travails of the British Empire in Indian hinterland with inexplicable and enjoyable blend of humour, maturity and spine-chilling sequel of events throughout the book.. an indispensable for those who want a beat-off from usual fiction work. It is an excellent fiction based on real happenning (and possibly drawn upon real characters emulated in Farrell's mould. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jrobertus | 1/31/2014

    " I read this novel many years ago but loved it. It is part of Farrell's Empire Trilogy and is set in the Great Indian Uprising of 1857. A group of English soldiers and families is trapped for four months, besieged by Sepoys. It is meant to represent the actual Siege on Lucknow, one supposes. Although it is a drama with a lot of tension, given the potentially dreadful consequences, the book still makes hilarious observations about the English class system while the various groups are trapped and forced to live cheek by jowl. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sayantan | 1/28/2014

    " Really not what I expected, turned out to be way better. The "siege" in the title might lead you to believe this is a grim and gory tale of a last stand. Again seeing the 1857 connection, you might expect a didactic, piercing insight into the causes/effects of the revolt. Well those elements are of course there, but the witty observations of the authors about the psychology of the Raj and the hilarious characters and their interactions in such dire straits, is what makes this a great story "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessie | 1/19/2014

    " The problem with satire is that if not done properly you look to be advancing that which you are mocking. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexa Rozario | 12/8/2013

    " It was slow at first and the characters were all annoying but it was interesting to watch their evolution. The symbolism in the book is very good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chuck | 11/23/2013

    " This is a story about the Sepoy rebellion against the British in India in the 1850's. On another level it is a critique of the British ideas of the Victorian period. Though the book was published in 1973, the style is more reminiscent of a 19th-century novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shauli Chaudhuri | 9/19/2013

    " A historical novel masterpiece for sure. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kat | 8/28/2013

    " Sad and tragic, but also funny and satirical. Very well written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Whit | 5/4/2013

    " I am very rarely disappointed with books put out by NYRB publisher. How do they know exactly what I want to read? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 4/23/2013

    " I've finished the first two of J.G. Farrell's trilogy, this book being the second. His writing, meaning the way he frames scenes, life, people, circumstances, etc., is strikingly reminiscent of Dickens, perhaps more so than any writer I've ever read (except, of course, for Mr. Dickens). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kate | 10/3/2012

    " Fantastic book. I hated to have it end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Smoothw | 8/15/2012

    " Absoloutely hilarious and horrific at the same time, a very hard feat to carry of. Just thinking the name Fleury gives me a chuckle. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Farahad | 5/26/2012

    " I liked the book but it was very slow. I had to force myself in several places to continue reading it. Otherwise I might have given it a higher rating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elaine | 4/23/2012

    " Historically fascinating, finely drawn characters, often hilariously funny, and then in the final chapters surprisingly moving. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Geoff | 11/26/2011

    " I usually love books about India but I didn't get on with this. I found it a little slow and it didn't flick any switches in my brain. Shame! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gail | 4/9/2011

    " A great novel about the mid 19th Century Indian Mutiny. It had complex characters and was, in general, a joy to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kat | 3/15/2011

    " Sad and tragic, but also funny and satirical. Very well written. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Geoff | 3/6/2011

    " I usually love books about India but I didn't get on with this. I found it a little slow and it didn't flick any switches in my brain. Shame! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy | 1/25/2011

    " An excellent book, combining both heartbreak and humor. Particularly thought-provoking during this time of many wars on many continents, and the USA's tendency to think like conquering heroes. What do we know, after all, of other cultures?! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leendert | 1/22/2011

    " magnificent ... amazingly comic juxtapositions throughout, even-handed depictions of main characters ...

    the part towards the end of the Collector being taught a final lesson in tolerance and tempered viewpoints by a 3 legged chair was brilliant ... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hilary | 12/14/2010

    " Another fiction written like a non-fiction story. Enjoyed the characters immensely and the historical time period. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jo | 11/20/2010

    " The tale of an English settlement in India besieged during the 19th century. I wanted to like this, it was quite poetic in parts but I just couldn't warm to the characters or story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adarsh | 11/13/2010

    " What a fantastic book! Funny, just as it is thought provoking. Highly recommended! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessie | 10/27/2010

    " The problem with satire is that if not done properly you look to be advancing that which you are mocking. "

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