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Download The Sibling Effect: What the Bonds among Brothers and Sisters Reveal about Us Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Sibling Effect: What the Bonds among Brothers and Sisters Reveal about Us (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Jeffrey Kluger
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (525 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Jeffrey Kluger Narrator: Pete Larkin Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2011 ISBN:
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Nobody affects us as deeply as our brothers and sisters - not parents, not children, not friends. From the time we - and they - are born, our siblings are our collaborators and co-conspirators, our role models and cautionary tales. They teach us how to resolve conflicts and how not to, how to conduct friendships and when to walk away. Our siblings are the only people we know who truly qualify as partners for life.

In this groundbreaking book, renowned science writer Jeffrey Kluger explores the complex world of siblings in a way that's equal parts science, psychology, sociology, and memoir. Based heavily on new and emerging research, The Sibling Effect examines birth order, ongoing twin studies, genetic encoding of behavioral traits, how emotional disorders can affect - and be affected by - sibling relationships, and much more.

With his signature insight and humor, Kluger takes big ideas about siblings and turns them into smart, accessible writing that will help anyone understand the importance of siblings in our lives.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Evaly | 2/20/2014

    " This book was slightly entertaining at first- I enjoyed the memoir portions. However, I gave up on it half-way through because I felt like I wasn't getting anything out of it. He presents research that contradicts each other and the only conclusion to draw is that no matter what you do, your kids are going to be messed up. I don't believe this, since I know many functional families. I was hoping for some helpful information, not just a lot of speculation. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kirstie | 1/17/2014

    " This book had some interesting ideas and many things that I already knew about siblings. It included information on birth order, sibling rivalry, and many other things that have been studied by doctors and psychologists. The problem was that there was too much information and so much speculation thrown in with some personal stories about the author and his own siblings that it was very convoluted and didn't really keep me interested. I did enjoy the author's personal examples however. Maybe he should have included more of those. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lee Ann | 1/15/2014

    " I was disappointed. It felt disjointed. The author's use of his family to illustrate points was a nice idea, but was forced at times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 1/11/2014

    " I read this thinking it would give me insight about my own siblings, but I really liked applying some of the ideas to my own kids. It's good to know that each of my children, because of their gender or birth order, is a likely candidate to be my favorite child. So, I'm off the hook with that one:) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 December | 1/7/2014

    " Was excited to read this after seeing the author's TED Talk. It's just ok. Lots of random studies mentioned, not very cohesive. Have to say I don't remember anything of the book, nothing notable -- and I just read it. See the TEDTalk, skip the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennavier | 1/5/2014

    " Well written and witty, The Sibling Effect took me on a journey through modern sciences view on sibling interactions. One of my favorite things was the humourous take on the science as applied to the author's own sibling experience. The one downside is none of it is really surprising. Or at least it's not surprising to a girl raised with three other kids full time and countless others on an as needed basis. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Heather the Hillbilly Banjo Queen | 12/28/2013

    " This was interesting until about half-way through when I found that it was reading like a memoir. If it was to be a memoir, I wish it had been billed as such. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda Price | 12/28/2013

    " Good read. The author chronicles most of his life and not necessarily case studies. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Monica | 12/7/2013

    " An interesting but at times simplistic view of siblings- I was most impressed by the ideas about the closeness between siblings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda | 9/18/2013

    " Somewhat helpful in my research. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marlo | 5/3/2013

    " Interesting book covering the different sibling interactions (same and different sex broods, twins, step, siblings), birth order, singletons, and the effects of family trauma. It made me reflect on my own relationships with my siblings. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Annie Johnson | 3/18/2013

    " A fascinating look at the sibling relationship - only children, twins, oldest, middle, youngest. Covered a lot of stuff. I thought it was a great read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liz | 2/20/2013

    " This book is quite enjoyable, if you're willing to accept it for what it is: a mix of memoir, scientific review, and journalistic flair. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff Clarke | 2/4/2013

    " As the eldest of three brothers, I'm right in the demographic sweet spot to love this book, which I did. Kluger smoothly weaves all kinds of research about sibilings (and only children) throughout anecdotes of his own experience as a brother. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tania | 12/6/2012

    " Not as interesting as I thought it would be - a lot of fairly obvious stuff, but a few surprises. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rianna | 10/13/2012

    " well organized w/ interesting study citations "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 L. Hager | 5/21/2012

    " An interesting blend of science and the author's personal experience. A family with four boys later became a "blended family" after their father's divorce and remarriage. The book examines the effects of birth order, favoritism and sibling rivalries. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shawn | 3/26/2012

    " I wanted conclusions, and there weren't any. The book is part memoir, part anecdotal research. It was an interesting read, but ultimately kind of a frustrating one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 2/10/2012

    " A few interesting points but mostly repetitive of things I already knew. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 11/3/2011

    " I'm only a couple chapters in, but I am loving it. His style of writing is immensely readable - what else would you expect from a Times journalist? I'm excited to hear what he has to say about fourth-born daughters in families of five ... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amanda | 10/14/2011

    " I was interested in this book because of my large family, and a curiosity of how I turned out the way I did. While it offered me some new insights, much of it is stuff I already knew. This is a low 3. It was interesting enough to finish and I did like all his personal anecdotes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 10/11/2011

    " A few interesting points but mostly repetitive of things I already knew. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 10/9/2011

    " Being a middle child, I had to see if what my family has been telling me all of these years is correct. His anecdotes are interesting and he has done research so his conclusions are scientific. Ultimately he did prove the "black sheep syndrome" plus, it was an easy read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Connie | 8/26/2011

    " This gets a little technical but the stories are funny and I can definetly see how birth order affects someones personality. Interesting read. "

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About the Author
Author Jeffrey KlugerJeffrey Kluger is a senior editor and writer at Time. He is a coauthor of the bestseller Apollo 13 and the author of The Sibling Effect, Simplexity, Splendid SolutionMoon Hunters, and two novels for young adults. Kluger lives in New York City with his wife and daughters.
About the Narrator

Pete Larkin has narrated dozens of audiobook titles, won five Earphones Awards, and been a finalist in 2012 for the prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He has been praised for his expert ability to speak in multiple accents. He is also an on-camera host and accomplished voice-over artist for hundreds of commercials and promos for a variety of companies, corporations, and governmental agencies. He was the public address announcer for the New York Mets and has worked as a radio jockey in New York, Baltimore, and Washington, DC.