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Download The Secret Pilgrim (Dramatised) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Secret Pilgrim (Dramatised), by John Le Carre
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,352 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Le Carre Narrator: Simon Russell Beale, Patrick Malahide Publisher: AudioGO Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2010 ISBN:
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Simon Russell Beale stars in this BBC Radio full-cast dramatisation of John le Carré's last Smiley novel.

George Smiley is one of the most brilliantly realised characters in British fiction. Bespectacled, tubby, eternally middle-aged, and deceptively ordinary, he has a mind like a steel trap and is said to possess 'the cunning of Satan and the conscience of a virgin'.

The Berlin Wall is down, the Cold War is over, but the world's second oldest profession is very much alive. Smiley accepts an invitation to dine with the eager young men and women of the Circus' latest intake, and over coffee and brandy, by flickering firelight, he beguilingly offers them his personal thoughts on espionage past, present, and future. In doing so, he prompts one of his former Circus colleagues into a searching examination of his own eventful secret life.

Starring the award-winning Simon Russell Beale as Smiley, and with a distinguished cast including Patrick Malahide as Ned, this engrossing dramatisation brings le Carré's masterful novel vividly to life.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Khalekan | 2/9/2014

    " Excellent way for Le Carre to phase out Smiley. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benjamin | 2/2/2014

    " This is the last of the George Smiley novels, and Smiley is not really even its central character. Rather, he serves as a kind of narrative frame for the story, and Le Carre uses him much of the time as mouthpiece for extended thoughts on the end of the Cold War. It is much less great than the best of Le Carre's work, but it is gripping and interesting anyway--if sometimes preachy and didactic--and it has flashes of the writer in his prime. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robby Johnson | 1/24/2014

    " Well, it's rather a slog because the whole book is exposition. It is a colleague of Smiley's telling the reader several stories of which he played a major or minor part in the past. None of the stories which make up this book are incredibly interesting, although there are a few moments that make you really want to turn the page. Not my favorite le Carre. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Teresa | 1/11/2014

    " As unlikely as it should be for my reading habits, I read this one in the George Smiley series first. It was, for me, a unique approach to the cold war and the odd coordinations that went on to achieve national security and secret information gathering. Truly enjoyed the chapters that played out like short stories to color the work of one of Her Majesty's spies. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kienie | 1/10/2014

    " I guess with John Le Carre there is no such thing as a happy ending. It's always bittersweet at best. I think that with age I will appreciate it more, but now I wish for something more definitive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 12/25/2013

    " I re-read Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy a few weeks ago and it made me want to re-read all Le Carre books, so I am ploughing my way through our whole stack. Even though they are dated, and in most cases I can remember the outcome from the last time I read them (1970's), it's like sitting down for a while and catching up with an old teacher, getting the chance to remember so many aspects of the 'deepest' fiction author I have ever encountered. What have I learned? Reading Le Carre ensures that I properly bury any notions of writing fiction. He is the master. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy Deemer | 12/21/2013

    " Entertaining book of short stories threaded together into a loose Smiley narrative. Fun, generally-predictable Russia House and Circus intrigue. Maybe I've been reading too much Le Carre of late... but it felt a little more forced, like an Alfred Hitchcock Presents compendium. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Glenna | 12/11/2013

    " This is like a bunch of small Le Carre novels rolled into one. All thought provoking and interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryan | 10/22/2013

    " The first LeCarre book I ever read; it is a compilation of short stories that is fast paced and intriguing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura | 9/18/2013

    " Another book on the Smiley's series. Not so good as the others. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Pawel Kowalczyk | 9/16/2013

    " I`m a fussy and unfortunately lazy reader so I don`t want to make unfair comments about this particular book. It just didn`t click in and I`ve already read better Le Carre`s books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Booth | 8/3/2013

    " I have read most of his books. I love his mystery and the way that he builds it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lera | 5/31/2013

    " Quite a gentle one here. Its something like a book of short stories crafted into a novel - tales looking back over a lifetime of spying. Not much glamour, quite a lot of regret. Beautifully written and put together as usual. Borrowed from the Histon Library. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zane Safrit | 3/23/2013

    " I'm a big fan of LeCarre'. And this is very good. Not maybe his best. A series of really short-stories, tales, from the vantage point of 'Ned'. Pulls together some of the threads from his earlier novels, wrapped around the character George Smiley. Worth it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill Currie | 11/4/2012

    " Using this type of chronicling in journeying back in Ned's career was a wonderful writing technique. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sriram Srinivasan | 10/23/2012

    " Well... this was my first Le Carre... and i was impressed by this.. this one for more a look back at the life of the main protogonist.. (Ned).. its an easy read.. the way Le Carre recreates post war Europe and the heights of espionage is just superb.. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoff | 7/1/2012

    " A reflection on the end of the Cold War. A bit of George Smiley and a lot of one of his spies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eddie | 6/22/2012

    " Remembrances of past spy experiences "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Servini | 6/19/2011

    " A very reflective book but one which raises a lot of questions, examining the underside of intelligence work. Well worth the read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julie Howley | 11/20/2010

    " A masterpiece by Le Carre exploring the morality/amorality of the politics of the West & of the Intelligence community. Great compassion - I think it's one of his best. "

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