Extended Audio Sample

Download The Red Badge of Courage Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Red Badge of Courage Audiobook, by Stephen Crane
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (42,106 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Stephen Crane Narrator: Edmond O'Brien Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
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Edmond O'Brien reads the 1895 war novel by Stephen Crane. Considered one of the most influential works in American literature it features a young recruit in the American Civil War who is faced by the cruelty of war. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne-Marie | 2/17/2014

    " I thought this was a pretty good book. The main character was annoyingly full of himself at first, but then he became wiser and realized how terrible and scary war can be. It was hard to put down because almost the entire book took place in the middle of a battle! My one complaint is that even though the main character's name was Henry Fleming, he was only referred to as "the youth" throughout the entire book. I don't know if this was meant to emphasize how young Henry was to be in the army or what, but it seriously got annoying. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 2/7/2014

    " An excellent description of combat during the civil war as seen by a single soldier. I just wish the plot had been more engaging; both not enough setup and a sudden ending. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jared Barcelos | 1/28/2014

    " I think that there are some very telling moments in this novel, and I think there are some beautiful metaphors, but there was something about it that just did not draw me in. I can't quite put my finger on it, but something was missing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sluggish Neko | 1/22/2014

    " The portrayal of war is very vivid and honest, but the language and style made this story difficult to get through. It's very detached and oddly, the main character is hardly ever referred to by name. He's just a youth. Perhaps, it's a statement about the impersonal nature of war when lost in a sea of soldiers. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hilary | 1/18/2014

    " Dull, colloquial, whiny, and patriotic: this book is all the things I hate. Needless to say, I hated this book too. The gore at the end was pretty cool though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marty | 1/17/2014

    " I don't know that I was particularly excited to read this book, but I had felt that it was one of those books that you should read. Having now attained that goal, I can say that it wasn't a waste of time, even if it wasn't the most exciting use of my time either. Stephen Crane uses pretty stirring prose and realism in depicting the vagaries of war. His descriptions linger on images and ensure that you have a full idea of the physical setting and actions, and he speculates rather convincingly on the emotions and thought processes going on during battle, slicing out the romanticism of war, without completely annihilating its moments of nobility either. While that is his strength, it is also his weakness. His tone is so measured and deliberate, that the passion of war is eked right out of the pages. I think this is largely because of his decision to leave his protagonist mainly nameless (while his name may be Henry Flemming, we only learn this from other characters, never from the narrator, who only refers to him as "the youth"). I can understand why Crane chose to do this, because a character without a name could help the reader to place him or herself in that character's shoes ... this is an everyman character. But that is where Crane loses me. In his attempt to be universal in character, his wide span only hits the mark in a couple of different places. It is hard to force yourself into another character's shoes when you disagree with a lot of the things that they are doing or feeling, or if you simply cannot see yourself doing or feeling those same things. This universal approach also, as I mentioned, robs the passion from the war. If I were more invested in this character the defeats would be that much more harsh to accept, the victories, that much more glorious. As it was, I was almost indifferent to the character's outcome, because I was not connected to him. Ironically, as Crane showed the plight and purpose of the common soldier, it gave me the feeling of the uncaring officer as a spectator to the narrative. Overall, however, Crane's work of realism cannot be discounted completely by his all-encompassing approach, and I would recommend anyone who would like an idea of the thoughts and feelings and horrors of a battle in action, to read this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michele bookloverforever | 1/1/2014

    " I loved the story but my english teacher just about deep-sixed it for me by making us count the number of times the author used color words in the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hazel West | 12/8/2013

    " I truly loved this book. It was such a good look into the life of a young soldier and indeed, even a young man, who knows nothing of the darker side of the world and war, and has to learn the hard way the pointlessness of the Civil War. The language in this book is beautiful and haunting and Stephen Crane is truly a master of prose and creating characters. For some reason I loved how none of the characters were referred to by name except when they spoke to each other. The story almost sounded as if Henry was relating it to grandchildren years later, at least that was the feeling it gave me. I liked the real aspect of it and I think the warfare and the thoughts of the men were portrayed very accurately to what things were really like. I loved the camaraderie of course, and how Henry grew in the story from a boy who would run to a man who could stand and face his fears. Just a wonderful war story, and well deserving of 5 stars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peter Wolfley | 12/7/2013

    " It's a war story but there are a lot of parallels to everyday living. We always think we'll react differently in stressful situations before we are actually faced with the crisis. The overall message is that man can do incredible things when he forgets himself and goes to work. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wesley Morgan | 12/7/2013

    " I wanted to like this book, but I could not get through it. There were some scenes where I love the imagery and figurative language. But, for the most part, I could not follow what was happening. Maybe I'll read it again someday and actually understand what's going on. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victoria | 11/16/2013

    " Very dramatic and an avid exploration of a young man's character, "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jada | 11/13/2013

    " I had to read this in high school for a presentation and I did not appreciate it... I love to read and once I start on a book I will try to finish it but this book just made me want to sleep... Its a good read I guess but just not of my taste :/ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wyatt Indermuehle | 10/31/2013

    " This book is a great depiction of the civil war. It had great descriptive battle scenes, as well as insightful moments into the soldiers minds. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Michele Silverstein Ludwig | 10/5/2013

    " I had to read this in HS. This has got to be the worst book I ever read. Hope they dont make kids still read this garbage in school "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christine H | 9/8/2013

    " I had to read this in high school. It was horrible. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thomas | 5/2/2013

    " Listened to recorded book. Did not enjoy this book in high school and did not enjoy it this time either. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Byrel | 4/17/2013

    " This book really showed the main character's development well. It isn't something I would voluntarily read a lot, but it isn't bad at all. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Omar | 10/19/2012

    " I definitely see why this is a classic. Hemingway and Faulkner must have been heavily influenced by Crane. What a shame he died at 28. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Riley Freer | 6/26/2012

    " I remember doing a read through of this book during English classes while still in Middle School. Although I thought the book would be dull and hard to understand this was not the case. I remember that I actually found myself quite enjoying the book by the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Horton Deakins | 2/27/2012

    " Required reading for Civil War or American History buffs. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mrs. Doglvrs | 7/2/2011

    " I actually had a hard time reading this - I think it was the dialect, but still glad I read it finally, since it's been on my "to-read" list forever! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bev | 6/30/2011

    " This book is one of my favorites on tape because of the great reader doing the accents of the different characters. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathi | 5/17/2011

    " Listened to this on a road trip to Missouri. I'd forgotten how descriptive it is. Definitely liked reading it years ago better than listening to it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Allegra | 5/13/2011

    " There's nothing I can say about this that hasn't been said. The story is just kind of awkwardly put together and the symbolism is too bold. Not my favorite. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Angillham | 5/10/2011

    " I read this back in highschool and I might appreciate it more now, but I remember hating it at the time and hating the main character. However, I think that might have been because it messed with my idealism. So now that I'm more of a realist maybe I should read it again and appreciate it more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dj | 5/10/2011

    " This was an awesome book about the Civil War and its affect on one young man and how he grew up as a soldier. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michele | 5/9/2011

    " I know it's a classic, but it was hard to follow. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Horton | 5/8/2011

    " Required reading for Civil War or American History buffs. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Rebecca | 5/6/2011

    " I voted for this book at didn't mean too...oops
    This was one of those books I HAD to read in high-school...hated it it... Sorry Mr. Crane...but maybe if I read it again I might like it.... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andy | 5/2/2011

    " This was only just ok (probably more a 2.5). I understand that it was trying to give a young persons real experience of war but i just didn't empathise with the young lad and didn't buy into the atmosphere it was trying to generate. I would not recommend.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tony | 4/26/2011

    " "He had been where there was red of blood and black of passion, and he was escaped." The book still evokes a visceral feel for the terror, confusion, and arbitrariness of the battlefield. "

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About the Author
Author Stephen Crane

Stephen Crane (1871–1900) was an American novelist, poet, and journalist. He worked as a reporter of slum life in New York and a highly paid war correspondent for newspaper tycoons William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer. He wrote many works of fiction, poems, and accounts of war, all well received but none as acclaimed as his 1895 Civil War novel, The Red Badge of Courage. Today he is considered one of the most innovative American writers of the 1890s and one of the founders of literary realism.