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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (74,493 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Niccolo Machiavelli Narrator: Shelly Frasier Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2008 ISBN: 9781400178438
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The Prince has long been both praised and reviled for its message of moral relativism and political expediency. Although a large part is devoted to the mechanics of gaining and staying in power, Machiavelli’s end purpose is to maintain a just and stable government. He is not ambiguous in stating his belief that committing a small cruelty to avert a larger is not only justifiable but required of a just ruler.

Machiavelli gives a vivid portrayal of his world in the chaos and tumult of early-sixteenth-century Florence, Italy, and Europe. He uses both his contemporary political situation and that of the classical period to illustrate his precepts of statecraft.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Sarkies | 2/19/2014

    " Having now read this book three times I sort of wonder how Machiavelli's name came to represent a sort of politics that involved deciet, manipulation, and backstabbing, because for those who claim that this is what the Prince is about have probably read the wrong book, or probably not read the book at all. Somebody even suggested that The Prince was satire because they could not imagine that anybody would suggest such actions to anybody, especially if that person was seeking to live a virtuous life. To the person who claims that The Prince is satire, my response is that Machiavelli is deadly series. He was not laughing when he wrote this book, and his audience were not laughing when they were reading it. As for the person who claims that the book is about scheming and manipulation, I respond by asking them to show me where it says that, because after the third time, I struggle to actually find anything of the sort. Further, in response to them, I will also suggest that if you are a ruler then you ignore Machiavelli's advice at your own peril. Before I go further to expound upon what Machiavelli is advising in this book we must first look at the context in which it was written. I say this because if we apply Machiavelli's principles to the modern day you will probably find yourself in The Hague being charged with war crimes. To be blunt, we simply cannot apply Machiavelli's advice as written in the modern world, in the same way that we cannot act in the way Joshua (of the bible fame) acted when the Israelites invaded the promised land. Now, Machiavelli was writing to a Florentine Prince in 14th Century Italy (which puts us right in the middle of the Renaissance). Now, today we live in a world with instantaneous communication where there are a handful of powers that dominate world affairs, and is governed by a basic parliamentary style institution (which we call the United Nations). However, that did not exist in Machiavelli's time. These days there are effectively four superpowers (Russia, China, Europe, and the United States) and practically every other country will throw their allegiance behind one of them (usually for protection against the others). Any alliances that exist between the superpowers are tennuous at best (though Europe and the United States do have a reasonably strong alliance, though it does not mean that Europe will always vote in accordance with the US's wishes). However Renaissance Italy was much different. While the church still had power, it was in decline. Gone were the days of Pope Innocent III where kings would fear excommunication for even thinking in opposition to the Pope, and gone were the days when the Pope sat securely on his throne in Rome, however the church still held sway over Western Europe. Still, it did not come down to the church having control, but which noble family had control over the church (one could easily swing the church over to your side by installing your man in as pope, as the Medici's, among others, had managed to do on occasion). There were some large kingdoms, such as France and Spain, that could influence control, but in many cases these kingdoms were not exactly powerful, and one could protect oneself by playing them off against each other. There was also Venice, which was a very powerful maritime power, but when it came to domination over the land, it was very weak. Venice's navy was powerless against landlocked principalities such as Florence and Milan. Northern Italy (as well as Germany) were not unified nation-states, but a collection of city states and principalities that would forever be at each other's throat, and while there was a titular 'Holy Roman Empire' he was effectively powerless. In fact he did not even have his own army, but had to rely upon the generosity of his allies to attempt to exert control, and as Phillip of Spain discovered when he was elected emperor, ruling Spain and ruling the Holy Roman Empire involved a completely different skill set. Now that we have an idea of the political situation of the time, let us now consider what Machiavelli is actually saying here. The theme that runs through the book is how to be an effective prince, and how to survive, and to do that you need to be respected (loved and feared) and not hated. Machiavelli is very clear on this point because if you are hated then you are not long for this world. Remember, Renaissance Italy is like 'The Game of Thrones' on steroids, and as it is said in The Game of Thrones, 'when you play the game of thrones you either win or you die'. That, my friend, is 14th century Italy. Now, it is clear from the first couple of pages of this essay (because that is what it is) that Machiavelli means what he says. First he says that there are two forms of government, the principality, which is the rule by a human, and there is the republic, which is the rule by a constitution. He points to another book he has written, The Discourses, which deal with the republic, so he skips over that system of government here and focuses on the idea of rule by a human. The main difference is that where the state is ruled by a human, the human can effectively do what they want. The only restraint on their power is the potential that they are removed from their position, usually by force. They cannot forfeit their role simply by breaking the law because they are the law. One of the things that he warns against is living in excess, namely because that generates hatred among the subjects, and when that happens, all they need to do is to either rebel and thus overthrow you, or petition one of your enemies to come and remove you. Machiavelli also makes extensive use of examples of other princes, both modern (in his time that is) and ancient. Now, all of the ancient sources that Machiavelli had we have so we can easily check his references, however with the modern examples, in a number of cases we only have him to rely upon, however you can be assured that his readers would have been well aware of the political situation at the time. Simply put, he could not make them up. In any case it is very clear that he is not writing to an idiot, but to an intelligent person that would also be well aware of what he is talking about. Further, he also appeals to common sense, but uses examples to prove why that course of action is wise. For example, he talks about using auxilery troops (that is borrowing an army from another prince) and why such a course of action is foolish. The reason being is that if you lose, you are going to have another prince that is somewhat upset with you because you have weakened his position. However, if you win, then you have a neighbouring territory that is occupied by a foreign army that is more than likely not going to leave, and as such this situation is a lose lose situation. Now, can we apply his principles to today and my response is that we can. One of the managers at my former work would give new team leaders a copy of 'The Art of War' explaining that the principles that Sun Tzu uses to fight wars can also be used to manage a team, or even a department. I would suggest that the same applies to 'Il Principe'. We simply cannot take the book as is and apply it literally simply because, as mentioned above, we will get into trouble (and we simply cannot invade and conquer our neighbour's team). However the principles of respect and hatred apply. As a manager we need to inspire respect within those we are managing, we cannot demand respect because that garners hatred, and by garnering hatred, we undermine our position. However we need to garner respect, and if that means making an example of a disruptive and rebellious team member, then so be it. In fact, that is expected, because once again if we don't make an example of a rebellious team member, we end up undermining our own position. In my time I have seen team leaders as leaders who have earned the respect of their team, and advanced. I have also seen team leaders act as bosses which results in them being removed or demoted. I have also seen team leaders play their team members up against each other, and while they survived for a time, their position was eventually undermined. Indeed Machiavelli does say that there are times when playing factions off against each other will strengthen your position, however it will not work all the time. In fact, while it may strengthen your position when you are at peace, it undermines your position when you are at war. Then there is fairness and justice (another theme that runs through this book) because by doing so may result in a perception of injustice, and indeed a team that fights amongst itself and stabs each other for their own personal gain (and to garner favouritism with the leader) may work in the short term but will ultimately fail. A team where each of the members respects and supports each other is an effective team (and I have seen that happen where a team goes from being at the bottom to being at them top) while a team that is at each other's throats will eventually find themselves collapsing in on their own disunity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dinah | 2/19/2014

    " An interesting read about how to get and maintain power. I enjoyed see some of the historical people I have read about recently stripped down to their successes and mistakes. It is a small book too and I read it pretty quickly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mloy | 2/19/2014

    " AWESOME! A little wordy but full of pearls of wisdom. Thoroughly enjoyable and educational. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gilang Permana | 2/18/2014

    " Catatan dasar seorang negarawan dan juga menampilkan sosok Borgias disini, patut disimak deh banyak hal menarik tentang politik perang "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matúš | 2/17/2014

    " It is a terrific masterpiece and a perfect guide for political leaders of all kind. Though instances of the era then are used, which are by all means accurate and convenient, even a present-day reader must be thrilled and amazed by the author's portrayal. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dhiraj | 2/16/2014

    " A very good book to understand politics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jay | 2/16/2014

    " Befriend or Crush, do not wound. Also, kill someone's friends/family before taking their property, as the former is easier to forget/forgive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jesse Garwood | 2/16/2014

    " Oh, my. Just awesome. Machiavelli gives absolutely cruel, dastardly advice - but damn if it isn't effective and persuasive. Everyone must and should practice a bit of Machiavelli in their everyday lives. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicolae81 | 2/16/2014

    " Excellent book on principalities and autocratic government fundamentals. Excellent political science read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Drew Corbett | 2/15/2014

    " It's a very fascinating book. There are certainly lessons that are less relevant today, but the method of thinking Machiavelli advocates is valuable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ephraim Lawson Bowick | 2/15/2014

    " I enjoyed this book a little too much. A gem of the renaissance! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rw | 2/15/2014

    " It all makes sense to me! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Manuel Alejandro | 2/14/2014

    " Everything you need to know about power and how to maintain it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ashley | 2/13/2014

    " Read this back in college but I have found it helpful to re-readvfrom time to time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andy Smith | 2/12/2014

    " Not much I can say does much to expand on the vast previous comments, but my personal opinion is simply that I enjoy the utilitarian way that Machiavelli reasons how to manage the people associated with gaining, maintaining and losing power over the masses. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victoria patterson | 2/11/2014

    " I thought it was a great book, that was well thought out and very easy to read despite the older style of writing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amr Yousef Diab | 2/10/2014

    " Brilliant , Although at some parts the ugly face of politics appear , but it was a great experience "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hmae | 2/10/2014

    " I hate this book. Maybe it's due to that my X loved this story. Short sided on my end? Yes. I'll give this book another try 15 years from now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melanie | 2/10/2014

    " While not the type of book I would usually read I was leant this on the premise that it was an interesting look at human nature, which I cannot deny to be the case. It was a little dry in places and there were times when I had to re-read pages because I'd stopped paying attention halfway through, but definitely an interesting look at how to gain and maintain power - I know where to go if I ever plan an invasion! Machiavelli definitely knew his stuff, with supporting arguments taken from across centuries and woven into a 'useful' guide of what to do and what not to do when attempting to wrest power. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 2/9/2014

    " Root of much modern, philosophical, political doctrine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick | 2/8/2014

    " Great, a classic read that took me too long to get to. Exploring the themes of this novel is something I'll need a few read throughs before I'll discuss it though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbara Rademaker | 2/7/2014

    " Timeless book! I read it in 2009 while I was in Bolivia and was amazed by the similarities between the book and what was happening at that time there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fernando Zanardine | 2/7/2014

    " I recommend reading sun tzu instead of this "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyssa | 2/5/2014

    " The proto business school prof. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Issa Raji Haddad | 2/4/2014

    " the best book ever. loved it, and planning to read it again and again. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kate | 2/3/2014

    " I understand the merits of Machiavelli in the grand scheme of the development of western thought, but damn is his writing cumbersome (unless this is just a lousy translation). Maybe that's the real reason why his work has produced so many maxims? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne Caldwell | 2/2/2014

    " It has been quite a while since I read but it was fascinating "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kaylee | 2/2/2014

    " Very interesting, if nothing else. I have no clue how I was supposed to approach this book, but I'm happy I made the attempt. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wm | 2/2/2014

    " Not as meaty as I had hoped, but still fascinating. The best part is actually the history/portrait of Castruccio that was appended to the project Gutenberg version I read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carlos | 2/1/2014

    " Human nature is still the same even after centuries... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jay | 2/1/2014

    " Befriend or Crush, do not wound. Also, kill someone's friends/family before taking their property, as the former is easier to forget/forgive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Markham | 2/1/2014

    " Interesting discourse on Renaissance political theory. Surprisingly accurate reflection on actual human nature--still relevant in today's political world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna Parker | 1/31/2014

    " I've always enjoyed this book, The Prince formerly known as The Prince. I find intrigue fascinating; the master plan to dominate and conquer, the depths they sink to the weave their schemes and all the while with flawed, but fascinating logic of why. Like the Borgia, Medici, and Sforza families, it's like glimpsing the original Sopranos before the big hair, bling, wait, they had those too. Their insanity and villiany runs rampant, yet they are compelling. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kjersti | 1/31/2014

    " As sad as this is to admit, I originally was interested in this book because the Danish TV series 'Borgen', about life in Danish politics, has used bite-sized quotes in introducing each episode. I always had very negative connotations to Machiavelli, as I'm guessing most people do today, but as I was studying politics at the time they interested me. Anyway - to my limited mind, this book was a very good analysis of the world of power, without making any pretense of feeling, sentimentality, or even morality. Such a refreshing read, in a world where every strategic move is veiled behind a thin excuse of "it's for the betterment of the people". We want to believe that politicians we've voted into office are after our own interest, and refuse to see power for what it is. Either way, a solid read, that has really solidified my disdain for the world of power. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aniruddha | 1/28/2014

    " The Prince is a good book to read and a better book to digest and swallow. It is not a very easy read yet its small length allows a reader to re-read it several times in a day. This makes it very accessible. Also, the chapter are only superfluous; in essence each chapter can be read independently of the others. It is a book every political enthusiast must have. It is book about human nature and nature of princedoms. There are many quotable quotes one can discover. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Betterservicesconsulting | 1/28/2014

    " This work is a manual for politicians and leaders. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Appel | 1/28/2014

    " The Prince is Machiavelli's how-to-guide for non-hereditary princes to rule through "virtu." Machiaveilli advises the princes take a ruthlessly pragmatic approach to politics. An intensely controversial book, well-worth reading for any political observer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 1/26/2014

    " I read this book in high school for a history class. I'd like to read it again someday. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Burton Li | 1/25/2014

    " Great classical strategic read. Most notable insight to me: Never trust auxiliaries. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caroline | 1/25/2014

    " A classic, a required reading book prior to entering 10th grade by my grandson, is an interesting look at the "study of power and politics." A commentary would probably help me absorb it's greater meaning. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan Hicks | 1/24/2014

    " Genius. You need not agree with Mchiavelli or his approach to admit that he is one of the most pragmatic and observant leaders in history. Even if I don't agree with his solutions, I learned a lot from the problems that he noticed. This book does not deserve the stigmata that follows it. This is not the "Tyrant's Handbook" or a mere prequel to Robert Greene's 48 laws. It is literature's introduction to the dark side of leadership. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Willo Font | 1/24/2014

    " Enjoyed the first 50 pages . Then Ugh! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jill | 1/22/2014

    " did he write this book as a 'joke' or not? There is plenty of relevant and good insight in this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caitlin | 1/20/2014

    " Not the most gripping read, but it was pretty amusing. Not that it's supposed to be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danielle | 1/20/2014

    " Though I do disagree with Machiavelli in some views, I admire him greatly. His pure nerve and strangth, especially in criticizing royalty is truly great. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kyle | 1/20/2014

    " Full of handy tips on ruling peasants! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ray | 1/19/2014

    " Insight for becoming a great leader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 T.J. Blackburn | 1/19/2014

    " We were suppose to read excerpts from this for class, but since it was on my list of "wish I read in High School" I decide to read it all the way through. Glad I did. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Valerie | 1/19/2014

    " The ultimate guidebook on how to attain power and keep it. This slim little book should be required reading for all high school and college students. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Xavier Ménard | 1/19/2014

    " It was a fine book, very interesting. Was full of thoughts on human reactions in different circumstances, though I found it difficult to relate with our contemporary world. You cannot apply these principles in republics, and the traits of a great leaders are ought to be found in other great philosophy books... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lydia | 1/18/2014

    " Used for classes and evil essays. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alkis Romeos | 1/17/2014

    " A book of rules to live by "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caitlin | 1/15/2014

    " Not the most gripping read, but it was pretty amusing. Not that it's supposed to be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah | 1/15/2014

    " I had to read it for a school assignment. Though is was not something I really wanted to read it was significantly less painful than several other school books I have been assigned previously. At least this one can be put to use. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/15/2014

    " The crux of my undergrad read load, and the only one I remember aside from Adam Smith. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fahim | 1/13/2014

    " A lot of it is outdated because of the way modern politics works, but it gives a good insight into how Europe ran in the past and how people would govern their principalities. Worth a read for an aspiring business person. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lori Grant | 1/13/2014

    " A should-read book on office politics which will happen to you and around you whether you participate in politics or not. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anteru | 1/12/2014

    " It was the best book ever when it comes to maintaining one's power during those trying times. Sadly those tips given by Niccolo Machiavelli weren't applicable anymore. Although we could modify some rules/tips to be able to use it for ourselves. The sentence that was really tattooed in my mind is "It' better to be feared than to be loved. This concept sparked different reactions from my friends who were really on the love side. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michaela | 1/11/2014

    " Prepare yourself. My dictatorship is coming. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anton Berger | 1/9/2014

    " I've read this many times, a fantastic book! not to be taken literally, but definitely something to think about. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Desiree | 1/9/2014

    " a classic book chest item. feels archaic somehow to read it nowdays "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna | 1/9/2014

    " Sad but true when it comes to the corruption of power. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dustin | 1/8/2014

    " This is definitely one that I'll have to read again someday. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fernando Zanardine | 1/8/2014

    " I recommend reading sun tzu instead of this "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jake Barrington | 1/8/2014

    " Good book, the old style of writing is difficult to comprehend (at least as a 9th grader). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott Olson | 1/8/2014

    " While it has become popular to chastise him as hawkish and/or backward-thinking in modern America, an understanding of Machiavelli remains essential in both politics and business. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Coleen Dailey | 1/7/2014

    " I've been stuck in the Italian Renaissance for a while so this seemed an appropriate choice. Dedicated to Lorenzo the Magnificent and supposedly based on the life of Cesare Borgia it was an interesting read covering not only the strengths and faults of the leaders of various states or kingdoms in Europe in the 1400's but also of leaders from antiquity. A classical education was truly a blessing and in many ways still should be. Since Machiavelli sings praises of Cesare Borgia's behavior throughout the book, I don't understand why people "think" the prince was modeled after him. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 D.B. | 1/7/2014

    " Enjoyed while visiting his fair city of Florence - a primer for politicians modern and ancient. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack Bell | 1/4/2014

    " Far more rational (and also passionate) than one would assume. Also a good insight into Renaissance Italian history. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nicole Long | 1/4/2014

    " I gave it 1 star because I like to say Machiavelli. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott Bury | 1/4/2014

    " What I like best about Machiavelli is his advice to keep the noble families down, and make sure to keep the common people happy and look after their welfare. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shadab Ahmad | 12/29/2013

    " Hats off to such realist and no rubbish description of prince. Only I didn't like it...maybe because I can never become a leader :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aileen | 12/26/2013

    " I have never read this before and am very glad I read it with my book club-- the discussion was great. So many of his lessons/warnings still hold true today. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peebee | 12/23/2013

    " A classic that never loses its relevance. It's too bad that "Princess" has such lightweight connotations, because there are definitely some female political leaders who have used these lessons to be successful. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jaime | 12/22/2013

    " Shockiing but oh so applicable to so mnay ages of uman civilization. This book saddens me because it is still so applicbale to the sorry sate of mankind. That aside, it is excellent! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Elise | 12/20/2013

    " I started this one, thinking, "This is a book everyone should read." Then I finished the first disc and realized that I just didn't care. Life's too short. Leave the nation building to someone else! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fred | 12/19/2013

    " I enjoyed it immensely. Sage advice for brutal thugs in power, often misquoted. I really enjoyed Castruccio. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert Hultman | 12/17/2013

    " Interesting but long winded considering the axiomatic nature... if that makes sense. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Zachery Weaver | 12/17/2013

    " so far my favorite book ever "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carlin Humphries | 12/13/2013

    " Very insightful, and helpful for viewing history with a theoretical approach. Can also be helpful in the workplace. Overall very relevant to our lives, then and now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Faisal Alraslany | 12/13/2013

    " Nice book, the intro was too long. I liked how he was able to think that way in his time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sassan | 12/10/2013

    " What can I say? This is a classic. It is the "treatise for dictators and tyrants". I gave it a 5 because not only is it a classic, but it helps one to better delve into human nature. Machiavelli was quite prescient in his understanding of human nature for his time. This is a short treatise and it should be on anyone's "must read". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rishav Dasgupta | 12/9/2013

    " Extremely truthful book about monarchies around the world. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kerrie | 12/7/2013

    " Well that explains a lot "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thomas Kinsfather | 12/7/2013

    " The handbook on power politics and ruthless tyranny. A Western classic. Machiavelli takes you into the mind of the European feudal lord and despot king. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jasmeet Kalra | 12/5/2013

    " 120 pages took forever but each page was a great walk through history and shed light on some of the cruel periods. Not much has changed: 600 years ago and today - it is the same political games. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kamal Elhoseny | 12/5/2013

    " I think the best comment on Machiavelli is the Boney M hit "El lute" . Here's a guy who was has undergone injustice and defamation . I think he is a real patriot with a true love of his country , yet literature has ruined the picture of him forever . I give the book the highest rating because it's really worthy . "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicolae81 | 12/4/2013

    " Excellent book on principalities and autocratic government fundamentals. Excellent political science read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Channing Kimble-brown | 12/1/2013

    " Bored to tears. I also didn't appreciate the bit near the end where he says that Fortune is a woman that must be beaten. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 M. Bartos | 11/30/2013

    " I kind of want to be a prince now... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron Bubert | 11/29/2013

    " Interesting view on politics. Very funny read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Magda | 11/24/2013

    " I was obliged to read this book at the university and there they tried to teach us to express our opinions fully. However, to this book there is just one thing to be added: Masterpiece! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rajiv | 11/23/2013

    " Mind repeatedly blown. Why didn't I read this before? "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Elise | 11/22/2013

    " I started this one, thinking, "This is a book everyone should read." Then I finished the first disc and realized that I just didn't care. Life's too short. Leave the nation building to someone else! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fouad Jaber | 11/22/2013

    " "because destiny is a woman, an in order to be submissive she must be beaten and coerced" "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anita | 11/20/2013

    " It had always been implied to me that Machiavelli was a proponent for harsh cruel governments. I'm glad I read the book, it definitely dispelled that myth for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan | 11/20/2013

    " I enjoyed this more on this second read. I had a good translation, not this exact version. Mine was by Peter Constantine, The Modern Library, NY. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alek Novak | 11/19/2013

    " This book is extremely wonderful as well as insightful to anyone who would like to master the skill of leadership and social interaction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan | 11/19/2013

    " I enjoyed this more on this second read. I had a good translation, not this exact version. Mine was by Peter Constantine, The Modern Library, NY. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 11/17/2013

    " Excellent read and perfect fit for anything that smacks of Power- who has it and how to maintain it. Great companion text to Lord of the Flies "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victoria patterson | 11/13/2013

    " I thought it was a great book, that was well thought out and very easy to read despite the older style of writing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Burhans | 11/12/2013

    " One of the 12 books I think every human being should read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Yasemin | 11/11/2013

    " Do we invent anything new in politics! Machiavelli has written it all. Confronting to discover how it still applies to our times. Small book, still easy to rood but my philosophical class had more difficulty accepting that this still put into words what politicians were 'trying' to do nowadays.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fred | 11/8/2013

    " I enjoyed it immensely. Sage advice for brutal thugs in power, often misquoted. I really enjoyed Castruccio. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gabriela Lastres | 11/7/2013

    " I really liked it! If you're judging then you probably haven't read it or at least haven't read it well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Timmy | 10/31/2013

    " Interesting read. Quick as well. Most of the notable observations and advice seem to hold true in today's geopolitical world, 500 years later. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marius Voila | 10/30/2013

    " Anyone studying International Relations Theory and Realism will appreciate this book as it lays the beggining foundations down of Realist Theory and how a "Prince" and Government should rule based on that theory. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne Caldwell | 10/26/2013

    " It has been quite a while since I read but it was fascinating "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matt Mclimans | 10/25/2013

    " Very helpful advice for when I decide to found a principality from scratch. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leen | 10/23/2013

    " Difficult to read but very worth it "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Douglas | 10/19/2013

    " A real eye opener. Although it was written centuries ago it is just as valuable today and a great tool at understanding politicians. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hmae | 10/17/2013

    " I hate this book. Maybe it's due to that my X loved this story. Short sided on my end? Yes. I'll give this book another try 15 years from now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julio | 10/16/2013

    " The Prince is a classic dissection of power and should be read by all people. The only reason I give it 4 stars instead of 5 is because Machiavelli's writing style gets a little dry sometimes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jackie | 10/15/2013

    " Don't agree with his philosophy but it makes for a very interesting read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate Millin | 10/11/2013

    " An interesting book - I found it a difficult book to concentrate on but I am pleased to have read it and seen the theories in their original format. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandy | 10/7/2013

    " The wisdom imparted in this book is timeless. There are no minced words here. It is straight to the point on how to hold your own and maneuver through delicate political situations. And these situations bleed into other facets of one's life. A strategist's book for sure. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Todd Baltz | 9/29/2013

    " Excellent book. Read it once a year. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin Bruce Milne | 9/28/2013

    " Read it in Major Theories of the State I in Waikato University. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon Lamm | 9/26/2013

    " Great piece of literature. I would highly recommended for anyone interested in the nature of politics or the ways of power. His realistic point of view comes off harsh, but is absolutely necessary to explicate his message. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason Dookeran | 9/15/2013

    " This book should be required reading for all politicians the world over. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alejandro Ramirez | 9/11/2013

    " A prince has to be both charming and ruthless. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lea Joos-bischofberger | 9/11/2013

    " another book i read over 20 years ago "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ephraim Lawson Bowick | 9/10/2013

    " I enjoyed this book a little too much. A gem of the renaissance! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jr Bacdayan | 9/9/2013

    " A must-read for every student of politics. To be a lion and a fox, a true master's work. About 500 years after its publication, it's still applicable as ever. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaina | 9/3/2013

    " 'Tis better to be feared than loved." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 8/6/2013

    " Excellent read and perfect fit for anything that smacks of Power- who has it and how to maintain it. Great companion text to Lord of the Flies "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matúš | 8/6/2013

    " It is a terrific masterpiece and a perfect guide for political leaders of all kind. Though instances of the era then are used, which are by all means accurate and convenient, even a present-day reader must be thrilled and amazed by the author's portrayal. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thad Pinakiewicz | 8/1/2013

    " Want to Win and rule a feudal kingdom at all costs? This is for you. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bima Manggala putra | 7/21/2013

    " Loving this book, honest one and open the gate to the reality "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Loretta | 7/16/2013

    " you can feel the old world emanating from the words. The audiobook was too "radio announcer" for my tastes so I will be reading this hard-copy soon. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christen Mamenko | 7/6/2013

    " I did not enjoy this at all. I felt like I was reading a rip-off of The Art of War. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 P. D. Griffith | 7/4/2013

    " It's amazing how applicable the statements of Machiavelli are even to this day. You can see how his words still hold true to how people can obtain, maintain and lose power whether that be of a country or a company. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne-Marie | 6/25/2013

    " Weird.. AND... well, yeah. Weird. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gowtham Ragavendar | 6/18/2013

    " 'Greed, for want of a better word, is good.' - Gordon Gekko "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julio | 6/13/2013

    " The Prince is a classic dissection of power and should be read by all people. The only reason I give it 4 stars instead of 5 is because Machiavelli's writing style gets a little dry sometimes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alejandro Ramirez | 6/7/2013

    " A prince has to be both charming and ruthless. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Issa Raji Haddad | 6/1/2013

    " the best book ever. loved it, and planning to read it again and again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rick | 5/27/2013

    " Cold, calm and calculated..... It's application will live on and on and on.... A fascinating read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Randy Blackwell | 5/22/2013

    " As a writer, this novel was extremely influential on my knowledge of how a King in this period of history had to run a country and be auccessful. It was very very eye opening as to the perils of Monarchy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Ross | 5/20/2013

    " A truly remarkable book considering when it was written. Is it better to be loved or feared as a leader is the burning question and there are times to be both as a leader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Guillermo | 5/19/2013

    " Liked it, but was not at all easy to read, besides its ancient wording, not being familiar with the historical names, made things a bit harder "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christina Wright | 4/28/2013

    " It is better to be feared than loved "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron Bubert | 4/24/2013

    " Interesting view on politics. Very funny read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 katherine drake | 4/15/2013

    " This is amazing. As you grow older, it actually seems to deepen and opens more doors to thought. And, the philosophy within does not follow a specific doctrine, so is not weighted by the confines of the particular assumptions of one branch of thought and ideology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jr Bacdayan | 4/6/2013

    " A must-read for every student of politics. To be a lion and a fox, a true master's work. About 500 years after its publication, it's still applicable as ever. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Monique | 4/6/2013

    " Macchiavelli's The Prince is the other side of the Art of War coin. Read with an open mind "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Max Hall | 3/21/2013

    " The problem I had with this book was just the comprehension. Once you get past tthe language used, it becomes a pretty good informative book on how to control your state. It does not apply to our world, and is a brutal way of controlling a country, but shows thee truth of human nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexander | 3/7/2013

    " I thought that the Prince was well-written, but I found that Machiavelli did go on tangents from time to time. He never addressed particular aspects that he should have, but I thought that it was stronger than some of the prose in the Glass Castle. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott Olson | 3/6/2013

    " While it has become popular to chastise him as hawkish and/or backward-thinking in modern America, an understanding of Machiavelli remains essential in both politics and business. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Abd Alaziz | 2/23/2013

    " Machiavelli lived in Saudi Arabia. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thomas Kinsfather | 2/22/2013

    " The handbook on power politics and ruthless tyranny. A Western classic. Machiavelli takes you into the mind of the European feudal lord and despot king. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Markham | 1/30/2013

    " Interesting discourse on Renaissance political theory. Surprisingly accurate reflection on actual human nature--still relevant in today's political world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cecily Carver | 1/25/2013

    " Fascinating read. Lives up to its reputation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dan Beliveau | 1/20/2013

    " Finally got around to reading this political science classic. Very interesting. One of those books you need to read, re-read and then outline. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fatin | 1/11/2013

    " My first (?) non-fiction. Didn't do a lot in convincing me that non-fiction is enjoyable, but definitely filled with brilliance. Although just around a 100 pages, it felt like a whole lot more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Abd Alaziz | 1/2/2013

    " Machiavelli lived in Saudi Arabia. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alkis Romeos | 1/2/2013

    " A book of rules to live by "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Danny Delgiorno | 1/2/2013

    " was hard to understand and very boring "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jaime | 12/27/2012

    " Shockiing but oh so applicable to so mnay ages of uman civilization. This book saddens me because it is still so applicbale to the sorry sate of mankind. That aside, it is excellent! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jesper | 12/27/2012

    " Very interesting stuff, for people interested in statecraft as well as for people interested in 15th century Italy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Burhans | 12/23/2012

    " One of the 12 books I think every human being should read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jakub Maly | 12/8/2012

    " I was expecting something a bit different. The book is largely devoted to warfare and achieving military victories, not so much about diplomacy. The real politics examples are of course too long gone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyssa | 11/24/2012

    " The proto business school prof. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Ross | 11/16/2012

    " A truly remarkable book considering when it was written. Is it better to be loved or feared as a leader is the burning question and there are times to be both as a leader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hakan Jackson | 11/7/2012

    " I had a really rough time getting into this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fred | 10/27/2012

    " I enjoyed it immensely. Sage advice for brutal thugs in power, often misquoted. I really enjoyed Castruccio. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steelman | 10/14/2012

    " Machiavelli preaches the use of power for its own sake and that all means should be employed to attain and maintain power. Immoral or amoral, it is not difficult to see the influence of his book upon history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joachim Stray | 10/7/2012

    " What can I say. It is interesting and people remain the same throughout the ages. I guess that the value received for a present day reader is limited but it is still fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leslie Ann | 10/2/2012

    " I think that a lot of his advice is simply common sense. It was an interesting read "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katherine Simmons | 9/27/2012

    " How the strength of every principality should be measured.... indeed "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Daniel Kessler | 9/25/2012

    " If I were a prince in the 1500s I would be singing praises of this book. Unfortunately I'm not, and this book isn't as relevant to today's politics as I hoped it would have. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Y | 9/23/2012

    " I honestly hate how he thinks. Maquiavelo sees the people like animals, like possessions. However, his mind is just a reflection of the society he lived in. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Purpletrees | 9/13/2012

    " Struggle to apply it to daily life - but I will never enlist the help of a stronger power without thinking twice. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Abbyarthur | 9/9/2012

    " You can't argue with his advice. Still holds true centuries later. But, it isn't that interesting to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kaylee | 9/1/2012

    " Very interesting, if nothing else. I have no clue how I was supposed to approach this book, but I'm happy I made the attempt. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carly | 7/6/2012

    " Read this two years ago. I can barely remember it, but since it was for school I didn't particularly enjoy it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yann | 6/21/2012

    " Je le relirai avec plaisir! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rick | 6/9/2012

    " Cold, calm and calculated..... It's application will live on and on and on.... A fascinating read! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Greg O'Donnell | 6/6/2012

    " just read it as preface to "then and now" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne-Marie | 6/3/2012

    " Weird.. AND... well, yeah. Weird. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christina Wright | 5/26/2012

    " It is better to be feared than loved "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alejandro Ramirez | 5/25/2012

    " A prince has to be both charming and ruthless. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ray | 5/18/2012

    " Insight for becoming a great leader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 dainghia nguyenhoang | 5/10/2012

    " A leader need to be cold, have strong will, and show no mercy to people who against him, especially people who is standing on the land of politics. This's the main pont of this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rw | 4/24/2012

    " It all makes sense to me! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josh Gravlee | 4/23/2012

    " This book should be read by everyone. It gives a fantastic insight into the thinking of the type of person that gains and maintains power. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Markham | 4/17/2012

    " Interesting discourse on Renaissance political theory. Surprisingly accurate reflection on actual human nature--still relevant in today's political world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Teresa Ibanez | 4/6/2012

    " It's a bit boring to read but the ideas and concepts that are mentioned are interesting, regardless of how they resulted historically. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard | 3/23/2012

    " Though very prone to misunderstanding, this book has (like it or not) shaped the modern understanding of politics. Between this and his Discourses on Livy, Machiavelli has basically defined the modern political conversation singlehandedly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danielle Lott | 3/15/2012

    " Classic! A must read for anyone able to read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frank Mueller | 2/11/2012

    " Although there are some aspects of the book that portray a level of morality this is crass in the greater context of health. This book shows the view of one who is extremely Machiavellian in their nature; highly manipulative for their own personal gain. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate Millin | 1/30/2012

    " An interesting book - I found it a difficult book to concentrate on but I am pleased to have read it and seen the theories in their original format. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jakub Maly | 1/24/2012

    " I was expecting something a bit different. The book is largely devoted to warfare and achieving military victories, not so much about diplomacy. The real politics examples are of course too long gone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Graham Mumm | 1/19/2012

    " Classic work on power and how to get it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 1/12/2012

    " Root of much modern, philosophical, political doctrine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Betterservicesconsulting | 1/8/2012

    " This work is a manual for politicians and leaders. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emily Hoyt | 12/14/2011

    " Great book. Although one may take it literally and be shocked by Machiavelli's conclusions, there is also the theory that the book was Satirical -- however you take it, you will feel ready to run your own country after finishing it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paula Bernasor | 12/9/2011

    " Great tips on politics and dealing with people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 11/19/2011

    " A favourite- every bit as useful and applicable today as it was when Niccolo wrote it. Highly recommend. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Meg | 11/14/2011

    " Dull as HELL, but at least now I know how to rule the world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nickky | 11/2/2011

    " Readers must research for its historical context before anything else. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steelman | 11/1/2011

    " Machiavelli preaches the use of power for its own sake and that all means should be employed to attain and maintain power. Immoral or amoral, it is not difficult to see the influence of his book upon history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andre | 10/20/2011

    " If you ever wonder why politicians do things, READ, THIS, BOOK!

    This slim work explains the dynamics of naked, power politics. Read it until you understand it. The world will make more sense to you when you do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amanda | 10/15/2011

    " This was an okay book that I had to read for school. It was all about how to be a good prince and basically take over the world. Some of Machiavelli's ideas though were scarily correct and work even today. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marjorie | 10/13/2011

    " This is an astounding book. I never thought I'd like it, but it remains to be one of my top favorites today. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 James | 10/5/2011

    " If i understood Italian, I would have enjoyed this book more. Reading translations often proves a struggle, I would think, so the use of certain words are odd. Nevertheless, a very interesting read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott | 10/5/2011

    " While it has become popular to chastise him as hawkish and/or backward-thinking in modern America, an understanding of Machiavelli remains essential in both politics and business. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caitlin | 10/4/2011

    " Not the most gripping read, but it was pretty amusing. Not that it's supposed to be. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rune | 10/3/2011

    " If you're planning to conquer a region
    If you're an unscrupulous CEO
    A business student
    Or a rising manager at a multinational corporation

    - and -

    If empathy is a word for the weak
    then this book (Encyclopedia of warfare) is for you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon | 10/1/2011

    " Great piece of literature. I would highly recommended for anyone interested in the nature of politics or the ways of power. His realistic point of view comes off harsh, but is absolutely necessary to explicate his message. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Riku | 9/29/2011

    " Turned out to be an easier and more entertaining a read than expected from a political treatise. After having read Walden, Civil Disobedience and now The Prince one after the other, I now feel equipped enough to take on heavy weights like Nietzsche and heavier tomes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yineth | 9/28/2011

    " I honestly hate how he thinks. Maquiavelo sees the persons like animals like possessions. However, his mind is just a reflection of the society he lived. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gilang Permana | 8/27/2011

    " Catatan dasar seorang negarawan dan juga menampilkan sosok Borgias disini, patut disimak deh banyak hal menarik tentang politik perang "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rhya Moffitt | 8/26/2011

    " Surprisingly readable. If I ever decide I want to take over the world and need tips on ruling, this will be on my nightstand. Too bad Machiavelli has no conscience and believes in "proper uses of cruelty". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maurice Halton | 8/18/2011

    " Amazing that anyone could award less the five stars! This little book opens a window into the mind of a member of the governing classes of Italy in the era of small independent states and city republics. How could it be better? Its not fiction! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matúš | 8/17/2011

    " It is a terrific masterpiece and a perfect guide for political leaders of all kind. Though instances of the era then are used, which are by all means accurate and convenient, even a present-day reader must be thrilled and amazed by the author's portrayal. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pedro Zepeda | 7/29/2011

    " si te gusta la grilla,, indispensable "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laurens Bosscher | 7/28/2011

    " Incredible evil but nonetheless an amazing introduction to politics "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric McLean | 7/23/2011

    " I really enjoyed this, even if it is cynical and probably a bit outdated for today's world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 T.J. Blackburn | 7/11/2011

    " We were suppose to read excerpts from this for class, but since it was on my list of "wish I read in High School" I decide to read it all the way through. Glad I did. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jvpritc | 6/11/2011

    " THis is a must read for everyone in government. I read it when I was in the Army and just carrying it around in my poket made my superiors stop and view me differently. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alex | 5/24/2011

    " Good book for people, who want to thing about good and bad into the politic world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rubio | 5/24/2011

    " ¿Cómo detectar a alguien que no ha leído a Maquiavelo? Fácil: suele decir "Maquiavelo dijo que el fin justifica los medios..." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher M | 5/22/2011

    " Short Review: Not sure if the best book on leadership ever written, or the greatest attempt to troll a monarch ever written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 KJ | 5/21/2011

    " If you watch "The Borgias" on Showtime, you should read this book! The ebook is free. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 5/18/2011

    " Incredibly eye-opening. Slimy though he may be, tricksy Niccolo's a ridiculously intelligent guy. Now, excuse me so I can go take over the world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob | 5/16/2011

    " This book lays out Modern Thought, creates utilitarian ethics, and shows the need for man to master nature. This is a pretty important book in looking at understanding modernity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mercedes | 5/15/2011

    " Read part of this for my Philosophy course. I would love to finish it when I have the time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 5/14/2011

    " Machiavelli is a dick! Awesome read for anyone that either wants to screw someone over or learn how to spot people that are trying to screw you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erum | 5/14/2011

    " I got the chance to read a couple of chapters of The Prince for one of the modules I had last year at university.. An extremely inspiring read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lucas | 5/12/2011

    " Easy read. Makes a lot of points for how one should rule. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelci | 5/11/2011

    " The indispensable title. Eerily modern. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mohammed Ali Bapir | 5/6/2011

    " At its best, this can produce Hitler, Mussolini, and Saddam. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Karen | 5/4/2011

    " I got through six and a half chapters and realized that I couldn't repeat anything because I wasn't even paying attention. I'm not sure there was even a plot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rowena | 4/29/2011

    " Plan to take over a small kingdom? This is the book to read! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hugo | 4/25/2011

    " Hard book to read, I had to read twice and slow. Sinister and brutal politics and human nature are discussed. "

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About the Author

Niccolò Machiavelli, considered one of the great early political analysts, is a historical figure in the turning point from the Middle Ages to the Modern World. He was born in Florence, Italy, on May 3, 1469. He was the second son of Bernardo di Niccolo Machiavelli, a lawyer of some repute, and of Bartolommea di Stefano Nelli. Both parents were members of the old Florentine nobility. 

When his literary fame grew, he returned to Florence in 1520, where he became involved in the attempt to reform the city’s constitution. This was the height of Machiavelli’s literary activity and increasing influence. He died within a few weeks of the second expulsion of the Medici in 1527, at the age of 58.

About the Narrator

Shelly Frasier has appeared in many independent film and theater projects in Arizona and Southern California and has done voice-over work for commercials and animation projects. She trained at the Groundlings Improv School in Hollywood and South Coast Repertory’s Professional Conservatory in Costa Mesa, California. She has performed at theaters throughout North Hollywood and Orange County. Recent performances include Blue Window, The Battle of Bull Run Always Makes Me Cry, The Haunting of Hill House, and a British farcical version of A Christmas Carol. She resides in Hollywood.