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Download The Power of Character: Prominent Americans Talk About Life, Family, Work, Values, And More Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Power of Character: Prominent Americans Talk About Life, Family, Work, Values, And More Audiobook, by Michael S. Josephson
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,842 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Michael S. Josephson Narrator: David Ackroyd, Michael Gross Publisher: Phoenix Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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There is no higher praise we can give people than to say they have good character. But what really, does this mean? What makes this quality so essential to achieving personal success and fulfillment? More important, how can we build our own character and live more satisfying lives? Reflecting society's diversity, the contributing authors in this unique collection of essays speak from various cultural and professional backgrounds to share their observations on living with integrity, honesty, and compassion. From Dan Rather of CBS, to author Arianna Huffington and sports commentator Jim Naber, the contributors explore how character and ethics shape our destinies. Their stories will inspire listeners to explore character as a means of building better personal lives and a better world. Contributors include: Warren Bennis, Stephen L. Carter, Stephen R. Covey, Alan M. Dershowitz, Wayne Dosick, Susan Estrich, Richard and Linda Eyre, Arianna Huffington, Michael S. Josephson, Dan Rather, Laura Schlessinger, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, and Marianne Williamson. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yasmin | 2/19/2014

    " This is a great one! Lots of food for thought. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Margaret | 2/14/2014

    " Well written. Provocative topic. Interesting factoids. But not as well-researched as I would have liked. Profiles of character-education initiatives at the exclusive Riverdale Country School and the KIPP charter schools seemed high on anecdote and low on actual data. And why so much focus on school reform programs like KIPP, OneGoal and the Gates Foundation-backed High School Turnaround that seem to be run by young, white do gooders? I would have liked to hear from seasoned educators who are currently working successfully (or not) in the current system. Nonetheless, enlighting to read about the role that non-cognitive qualities such as grit, self control and social intelligence play in our ability to learn and succeed in life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pinky | 2/8/2014

    " Attention and nurturing provide a better basis for building character and adult success than high IQ. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan Hayne | 1/27/2014

    " This book is a must read for today's parents. The growing evidence, that a child's attitude is the chief determinate in child becoming a successful adult. Though illustrates this point beautifully though stories about the importance of attitude. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alyssa Crawford | 1/18/2014

    " Well-written, persuasive book on the factors that influence success (mostly educational) for children, particularly those from lower-income households. What the book fails to include is a consideration for different types of success, though that may be a factor of the types of programs reviewed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gabe | 1/17/2014

    " Good book, although I don't think the book ever posed or answered in questions. Like what causes grit? Or how do some humans have grit and others don't. I didn't really expect the book to be able to answer these questions. We just don't currently understand motivation that great. But that is the point. The book is fun read but nothing past that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margie | 1/16/2014

    " Enjoyed this book. Not many tips overall, but comforting. Along the lines of if you are active and involved with your kids, they will likely be fine. Don't do everything for your kids and they will be a bit better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick Wax | 12/17/2013

    " Changed how I thought about character vs intelligence and made me appreciate poverty issues and the effects they have on children and later as adults. Problems in education have as much to do with having good teachers and funding as it does with having good parents and a good community. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 12/15/2013

    " Makes a good case for early attachment theory and character building. Want to read this again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Claire | 12/7/2013

    " It was not what I had expected - I am pleased that I did complete reading it. There is an incredible amount of research, studies, etc.... I commend Mr. Tough on his thoroughness of the subject. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 robin | 8/29/2013

    " Tough blends a survey of social science research with compelling stories of individual achievement. The result is a tight, satisfying book that leaves the reader with plenty of fodder for interesting cocktail chatter and questions about how best to raise children. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claudia | 12/18/2012

    " It's a little academic, but it's good to see he's done the research to back the claims of what characteristics help just about anyone, in my estimation, to succeed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vivienne Woon | 7/21/2012

    " Very similar in style to "The Outliers". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebecca | 12/6/2011

    " Some pointers on early parenting coupled with how to bridge the education gap between impoverished children and well-off children. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chris Csergei | 4/3/2009

    " There were some interesting stories and idea in this book, but overall it was disjointed. I am not sure I really learned anything or have a clear idea what the author's point was. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura Tortorelli | 7/20/2008

    " I agree with this book's main argument, but like most journalists who write about education, he embraces the "great man theory" of educational reform and writes a love-letter to certain reformers, principals, teachers, etc., not an actual summary or review of the research. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly Deckelman | 4/27/2004

    " Excellent! Read this book if you care about eduction and poverty or if you have children. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jon | 3/15/2004

    " If you want in-depth look at the attempts to change the landscape of low income education, this is a great book. If you're looking for the information promised in the title, you will be disappointed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zach | 1/25/2004

    " See my comment for my review. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ada-Marie | 10/10/2002

    " I read this book at the suggestion of a girlfriend and really enjoyed the first half. The book fell apart during the second half when the author got bogged down in a technical discussion of chess and his own life. "

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