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Download The Other Side of the River Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Other Side of the River Audiobook, by Alex Kotlowitz
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (683 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Alex Kotlowitz Narrator: Stanley Tucci Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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Two Michigan towns, St. Joseph and Benton Harbor, separated by the St. Joseph River, are geographically close, yet worlds apart: St. Joseph is a 95% white, prosperous lakeshore community, while Benton Harbor is impoverished and 92% black.

When the body of a black teenaged boy from Benton Harbor is found in the river, unhealed wounds and suspicions between the 2 towns' populations surface as well. The investigation into Eric McGinnis' death inevitably becomes a screen onto which each community projects its resentments and fears.

Beautifully written and painstakingly reported, The Other Side of the River sensitively portrays the lives and hopes of the town's citizens as they wrestle with this mystery and others - and reveals the attitudes and misperceptions that undermine race relations throughout America. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bree | 2/17/2014

    " Having grown up in the area, this is a book I've had on my radar for a long time. For me, it was a fascinating read on the very complicated situation I grew up in, but hadn't been able to fully recognize until I left the area for college. I know that many St Joseph residents,especially those who have a greater stake in the community, were very embarrassed by the book and greatly dislike Alex Kotlowitz, labeling him an extreme liberal (we're talking about a pretty politically conservative area). But really, I found a lot of truth in the narrative. One might wonder if Kotlowitz gets too close to those involved to be objective, but he himself wonders that himself. The book is a bit heavy and I found myself reading it in energized bursts with a few weeks in between. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carlita | 2/14/2014

    " A real-life mystery that examines a midwest town divided, both literally and figuratively, by a river. A must read! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denali | 2/14/2014

    " A great example of digging deeper into a seemingly simple story and seeing what you find. Kotlowitz uses the story of a mysterious death to explore the life of two towns. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mac | 2/10/2014

    " Non fiction. Involves the death of a black teen age boy found in the river between the balck town on one side and the white town on the other. Kotlowitz writes with great compassion and understanding about the complicated issue of race in America. Not as compelling as his best work, "There Are No Children Here" which deals with the same general subject, this is still a great book and a must read for anyone interested in understanding how race continues to have such a profound effect on our society. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Arrienne Hudnall | 2/1/2014

    " not really sure how i feel about this. i found it informative and intesting, but left empty at the end, which is probably the point. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 1/17/2014

    " A difficult book to write without adopting a judgmental voice on the part of the author. The author does a nice job of looking at a series of episodes in the history of these two towns and how race and socio-economics shape our communities and our cultural paradigms. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin Kizer | 1/11/2014

    " Reading this because I lived in St. Joe for a few years right after this occurred. It's incredible the stark differences between St. Joe and Benton Harbor. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole Usher | 1/11/2014

    " Interesting tale about race in Michigan. It opened my eyes to the prejudice and racism that still exists today in what I would have considered a more open minded section of the country. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison | 1/4/2014

    " Interesting read though at times dry and a bit slow. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/4/2014

    " This book made me too sad to view it with any sort of "good book" vs "bad book" eyes. I'm sure it's a perfectly well-written book, and an interesting story(ies) for those disconnected from the area. Do not, however, read this book if you are about to move to St. Joe. :P "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 kenpen | 12/23/2013

    " I recently re-read this book and wasn't as thrilled with it as I was the first time I read it. The mystery of the teen's death was never solved, leaving me feeling hanging. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jenn | 12/20/2013

    " Um, got ALMOST through it. can't bring myself to finish. sigh. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 12/16/2013

    " A tale of the author's obsession with a mysterious death of a black teenage boy found in the river dividing two Michigan towns, one black and one white in the 1990's. A serious, sad, and eye-opening look at race in America. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deb Fenwick | 11/14/2013

    " Incredibly well researched saga of southwest Michigan. Explains the distinct class divide between race/socio-economic/"oldtimers"vs."new comers". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dwayne Ackley | 6/30/2013

    " A good book about race, crime, small minded opinion and the growing segregation of small towns in major metropolitan areas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 6/26/2013

    " Great non-fiction about race. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kory loeper | 6/1/2013

    " i thought this story qwas going to be more about a mistery about a murder but it turned in to two murders that i never thought that was going to happpe. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Logan | 3/6/2013

    " Despite the interesting subject matter, I found the author jumped around too much thus making it easy for the reader to lose focus. It felt like I was reading a series of essays all based around the same subject which were then thrown together to make a book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 2/22/2013

    " Ok, this is a bit dated, but it's about my hometown. It's kinda creepy when you know the people in the book. They got some stuff wrong though, but it's still an interesting look at race relations in the US. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mlh2o | 9/30/2012

    " well written...depressed me to think that there is such prejudices/stereotypes in the present day! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathy | 2/19/2012

    " An amazing account of what may and may not have happened in two small towns in SW Michigan... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 12/11/2011

    " Good Book to follow up There Are No Children Here "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 11/23/2011

    " History about Michigan -- Benton Harbor & St. Joseph. A very interesting book for me because I did not know much about the two cities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Llehman1 | 9/6/2011

    " Interesting read about two towns and the racial tensions - true story. Was a good book to discuss in book club. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brady | 9/3/2011

    " Interesting study of the racial divide in America. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tim | 9/2/2011

    " This book makes a lot of assumptions about individuals in it which takes away from its point at the end. I think that a clear presentation of the facts would have been a more powerful statement, actually. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denali | 4/28/2011

    " A great example of digging deeper into a seemingly simple story and seeing what you find. Kotlowitz uses the story of a mysterious death to explore the life of two towns. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sonya | 1/15/2011

    " We should ALL read this and face facts that racism exists from both sides. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 11/28/2010

    " A difficult book to write without adopting a judgmental voice on the part of the author. The author does a nice job of looking at a series of episodes in the history of these two towns and how race and socio-economics shape our communities and our cultural paradigms. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 9/26/2010

    " A tale of the author's obsession with a mysterious death of a black teenage boy found in the river dividing two Michigan towns, one black and one white in the 1990's. A serious, sad, and eye-opening look at race in America. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mlh2o | 8/16/2010

    " well written...depressed me to think that there is such prejudices/stereotypes in the present day! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 7/29/2010

    " Reading this because I lived in St. Joe for a few years right after this occurred. It's incredible the stark differences between St. Joe and Benton Harbor. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 6/19/2010

    " Interesting tale about race in Michigan. It opened my eyes to the prejudice and racism that still exists today in what I would have considered a more open minded section of the country. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephanie | 6/14/2010

    " This book made me too sad to view it with any sort of "good book" vs "bad book" eyes. I'm sure it's a perfectly well-written book, and an interesting story(ies) for those disconnected from the area. Do not, however, read this book if you are about to move to St. Joe. :P "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Llehman1 | 10/31/2009

    " Interesting read about two towns and the racial tensions - true story. Was a good book to discuss in book club. "

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About the Author
Author Alex Kotlowitz

Alex Kotlowitz’s honors include the George Foster Peabody Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and the George Polk Award. A former staff writer at the Wall Street Journal, his work has appeared in numerous publications including the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, and the New Yorker, as well as on public radio’s This American Life and on PBS’s Frontline. He is also the author of Never a City So Real and The Other Side of the River.

About the Narrator

Stanley Tucci is an actor, writer, film producer, and film director. He was nominated for several notable film awards, including an Academy Award for his performance in The Lovely Bones. Other recent celebrated roles include The Devil Wears Prada and Julie & Julia. He has won two Golden Globe Awards and has also received a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. He was nominated for a Tony Award for his role as Johnny in the 2002 Broadway revival of Terrence McNally’s Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune.