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Download The Origin of Species Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Origin of Species, by Charles Darwin Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (26,585 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Charles Darwin Narrator: Frederick Davidso Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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On December 27, 1831, the young naturalist Charles Darwin left Plymouth Harbor aboard the HMS Beagle. For the next five years, he conducted research on plants and animals from around the globe, amassing a body of evidence that would culminate in one of the greatest discoveries in the history of mankind—the theory of evolution.

Darwin presented his stunning insights in a landmark book that forever altered the way human beings view themselves and the world they live in. In The Origin of Species, Darwin convincingly demonstrates the fact of evolution: that existing animals and plants cannot have appeared separately but must have slowly transformed from ancestral creatures. The book fully explains the mechanism that effects such a transformation: natural selection, the idea that made evolution scientifically intelligible for the first time.

One of the few revolutionary works of science that is readily accessible to the nonscientist, The Origin of Species not only launched the science of modern biology but has also influenced virtually all subsequent literary, philosophical, and religious thinking.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Veteran narrator David Case…provides an authentic English accent that suits the material well; his diction is precise, making his narration easy to follow.”

    Library Journal (starred review)

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Ivan Vukovic | 2/17/2014

    " It is, without any doubt, a tough read, but a very exciting and very interesting one! After all, it IS a scientific classic and one of the most important scientific publications ever! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Kelly Carter | 2/11/2014

    " If you are at all interested in the never-ending debate on evolution, you really must read this seminal work. It's actually very accessible to any intelligent reader, not just scientists. It's amazing how much time and effort Darwin put into the development of his theory of evolution by natural selection. Natural selection happens, there's just no doubt about it. It does not explain the original appearance of life; selection happens after the genesis of life. It's clear that many critics of evolution simply have never taken the time to read Darwin's original work, or they wouldn't make some of the silly arguments they do, consequently their stronger arguments are diminished in credibility as a result. This is one of the most important and influential works ever published, so really should be read. And, it's an enjoyable read, too. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Don Gubler | 1/30/2014

    " Straight from the monkey's mouth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Lee Drake | 1/30/2014

    " When reading it, I am struck by how forward thinking Darwin is. He even argues here that global climate change could disrupt human societies - keep in mind this was written in 1859. While a difficult read, it is ultimately rewarding. "

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About the Author
Author Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin (1809–1882) was an English naturalist and the first evolutionary biologist, best known for his controversial and groundbreaking The Origin of Species. He introduced the concept of natural selection, marking a new epoch in the scientific world. The importance of his work was well recognized by his contemporaries; he was elected to the Royal Society and the French Academy of Sciences and was also honored by burial in Westminster Abbey after he died.