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Download The Nurture Assumption Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Nurture Assumption Audiobook, by Judith Rich Harris
4.26 out of 54.26 out of 54.26 out of 54.26 out of 54.26 out of 5 4.26 (23 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Judith Rich Harris Narrator: Paula Parker Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2000 ISBN:
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What makes children turn out the way they do? Why is it that good parents don't always turn out good kids? Judith Rich Harris questions the assumption that nurture is the crucial factor. Using examples from folklore, literature, and scientific research, Harris puts forth the electrifying theory that children aren't socialized by their parents, they're socialized by other children. It is what happens outside the home, while kids are in the company of their peers, that matters most.

The Nurture Assumption challenges everything we've been taught about rearing children and everything we believe about the emotional hangups of adults. It offers wise counsel on what parents can and cannot do, and relief from guilt for those who have tried their hardest but have somehow failed to produce a happy, confident, well-adjusted child.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sabah | 2/18/2014

    " Fascinating book on how children turn out the way they do and how. Harris' research is deep, accumulated over years of work within child psychology and her knowledge profound. However her vast book does not offer a conclusive response to what is best manner to raise children. Rather she claims genetics do not factor into in as much as assumed before and instead 'nature' (parents) lose in influence to 'nuture' (kids peers). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon | 1/31/2014

    " A thoroughly enjoyable and thought-provoking book. Harris challenges "the nurture assumption" that how parents choose to bring up their children influences how they ultimately fare in life. She argues that children undergo socialisation (ie learn how to behave) through their peer groups. To support her argument, she takes the reader on a journey through different cultures, species and periods of history. She also does a very good job of highlighting the pitfalls of psychology research - the appendix where she shows that Frank Sulloway's reanalysis of birth order data is a prime example of how not to do research, and was one of the book's highlights. In fact, I find it difficult to select favourite sections of the book, as there really is so much information in it and it's presented in an easy to read and light-hearted manner. "The Nurture Assumption" is a breath of fresh air from all the "blame the parents" literature out there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jim | 1/29/2014

    " This is a challenge to the traditional belief that parents are the primary shapers of their children's personality and psychological life. Harris argues that it is biology and peers that are more significant. I found this book helpful in thinking more completely about this issue and in not accepting just the popular view that parent's are primarily responsible for their children's psychological development. What I didn't like was the style of writing--it started to feel a little bit like her own personal need to not feel guilty herself with her parenting. It is one thing to say what psychology cannot prove (which is almost everything) and proving that the opposite is necessarily true. Most of the psychological studies can only show correlations not causation, but that doesn't mean that there can be truth there. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jery | 1/7/2014

    " I'm pretty sure this book is very smart and absolutely correct about why you turned out like you did. It's easy and fun to read, too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christy Kilgore | 1/2/2014

    " Every parent should read this book, if only to reassure themselves that every day isn't a trap to do something that may "ruin" your kid. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anh | 12/28/2013

    " Quite fascinating. Very funny lady. Best public transport read in awhile. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 MJ | 12/22/2013

    " this author has no credentials and while she makes good points, the book is totally overrated. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alice | 12/6/2013

    " I liked her tone, which is conversational but based on mounds of research. However, she measures "how children turn out" mostly by personality and becoming a "successful adult," neither of which I feel she defines satisfactorily. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sabrina | 11/25/2013

    " controversial; sells parents a little short, but definitely thought-provoking and interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 InYourFaceNewYorker | 10/30/2013

    " Gives you a lot of pause on the assumptions that children's personalities are shaped by parents. I'm not convinced by everything in this book, but most of it is worth thinking about. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patmcclain | 10/18/2013

    " Wonderful thinking. At first you think she's saying that parents don't matter but peers do. Well, she does say this but as long as the parents can determine the peers, parents have influence in this indirect way. She realizes the issue is more complicated than this and discusses it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephanie | 7/5/2013

    " Brilliant mind. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kaethe | 3/25/2012

    " It's nice to know that you can start blaming those "bad influences" pretty much as soon as you send your child to school. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michal Leon | 7/18/2011

    " Great book, a must-read for over-anxious fed with too may psychological theories parents. Well researched, convincing, eye-opening. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alice | 1/4/2011

    " I liked her tone, which is conversational but based on mounds of research. However, she measures "how children turn out" mostly by personality and becoming a "successful adult," neither of which I feel she defines satisfactorily. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patmcclain | 11/14/2010

    " Wonderful thinking. At first you think she's saying that parents don't matter but peers do. Well, she does say this but as long as the parents can determine the peers, parents have influence in this indirect way. She realizes the issue is more complicated than this and discusses it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tmlcoaching | 8/17/2010

    " Great book, a must-read for over-anxious fed with too may psychological theories parents. Well researched, convincing, eye-opening. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tycoon | 7/27/2010

    " Loses a star because it was so poorly written, but very interesting over all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christy | 6/3/2010

    " Every parent should read this book, if only to reassure themselves that every day isn't a trap to do something that may "ruin" your kid. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kaethe | 9/16/2009

    " It's nice to know that you can start blaming those "bad influences" pretty much as soon as you send your child to school. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Erika | 3/4/2008

    " gift from parents
    how people are influenced by their peers "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maya | 3/2/2008

    " This book gave me a lot to consider about parenting, and is a fascinating exploration of growth and development that puts so many assumptions into question. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erez | 2/17/2008

    " Very interesting, but a little bit too long and repeats itself from some point and on. "

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