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Download The Man Who Was Thursday Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Man Who Was Thursday Audiobook, by G. K. Chesterton
3.66 out of 53.66 out of 53.66 out of 53.66 out of 53.66 out of 5 3.66 (29 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: G. K. Chesterton Narrator: Orson Welles Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2010 ISBN:
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In a surreal turn-of-the-century London, Gabriel Syme, a poet, is recruited to a secret anti-anarchist taskforce at Scotland Yard. Lucian Gregory, an anarchist poet, is the only poet in Saffron Park, until he loses his temper in an argument over the purpose of poetry with Gabriel Syme, who takes the opposite view.

After some time, the frustrated Gregory finds Syme and leads him to a local anarchist meeting-place to prove that he is a true anarchist. Instead of the anarchist Gregory getting elected, the officer Syme uses his wits and is elected as the local representative to the worldwide Central Council of Anarchists. The Council consists of seven men, each using the name of a day of the week as a code name; Syme is given the name of Thursday. In his efforts to thwart the council's intentions, however, he discovers that five of the other six members are also undercover detectives; each was just as mysteriously employed and assigned to defeat the Council of Days.

They all soon find out that they are fighting each other and not real anarchists; such was the mastermind plan of the genius Sunday. In a dizzying and surreal conclusion, the six champions of order and former anarchist ring-leaders chase down the disturbing and whimsical Sunday, the man who calls himself The Peace of God.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stacey | 2/17/2014

    " oh what a fun little book! Absolutely charming. I may need a copy of this one on the shelf! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve Tappe | 2/16/2014

    " I'm going to have to re-read this. Liked it, but didn't get it. Couldn't follow the symbolism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen Fosco | 2/15/2014

    " This book was mind blowing. GK Chesterton has a mastery of language that he uses to evoke feelings and deep thoughts. The plot I would hazard a guess is a philospher's nightmare, or maybe a glimpse of heaven. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike Dixon | 2/13/2014

    " Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant.. Great fun to read, amusing, plot flies by at 100 mph and didn't have a bloody clue what the ending was trying to say... Recommended! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sean | 2/5/2014

    " This short novel is one of the pioneers of espionage fiction. The plot follows an undercover London policeman who infiltrates a ring of underground anarchists. Great writing, some action, and many surprises make this is a somewhat decent read. Not essential but it is a nice alternative to the plethora of WW2 & cold war spy thrillers that are from more well-known authors. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 2/2/2014

    " My only real association with Chesterton has been through Orwell's writings on him. Orwell despised C. as a chauvinist nationalist and a fetid Catholic. Despite that, I was strangely drawn to this novel and had it sitting around until now. I've always had a fondness for "anarchist" fiction (Conrad's "Secret Agent"; James' "Princess", etc.) so I found it odd that the conservative C. had written a novel about a group of mysterious anarchists who disguise their true identities behind names of the week. The main character Syme is a police detective infiltrating the group and out of blind luck becomes the 'Thursday' of the title. What follows is a bizarre, Flann O'Brien-esque mystery and chase film steeped in surreal imagery and outright beautiful prose! I don't want to give too much away: the wacky twists abound, but there is something really cool here that seems to be sadly under-appreciated. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gerry | 1/21/2014

    " My favorite book of all time. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Austin | 1/18/2014

    " My favorite quote from this book: "Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength in levity." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barb | 1/9/2014

    " A few too many 'aha!' moments amongst the characters. Overall an interesting way to look at society but not one of my favorites. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Philking | 1/5/2014

    " Sparklingly inventive! Detective story meets philosophical musings en route to the surreal. Imagine a story by Borges, packed with the reflections of A.Huxley, and thrown into the structure of a James Bond movie. Highly entertaining and recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paula | 12/30/2013

    " I listened to this on audio and I think I would have enjoyed reading it more than listening. It was an ok book with a lesson but I totally missed it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Catfantastic | 10/29/2013

    " Laugh-out-loud funny right up until the end, which got really disappointing really fast, but isn't quite bad enough to ruin the rest. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ray | 10/12/2013

    " A British novel from the turn of the 20th century. An interesting and somewhat different type of story, which makes a lot more sense if you don't try to rationalize everything, but simply think of the story as a "nightmare". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leeah Rod | 10/7/2013

    " Classic! Witty and capturing! Pick it up if you can, great for a wintery weekend! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dave | 3/26/2013

    " A fun ride, though it quickly becomes predictable and the ending is pap. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joshua | 2/17/2013

    " This book blew my mind - and whenever anyoen asks me to recommend a book, I always mention this one. Part theology of creation, part crazy adventure novel, this one is truly a masterpiece. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Justin Barker | 11/26/2012

    " A fantastic book. Reading it made me feel quite intellectual! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Terry | 4/3/2012

    " A somewhat dated "nightmare," but the language of the telling is amusing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Belinda | 7/19/2011

    " Interesting premise with an adept writing style (if a little overly dramatic at times). The main twist was easily guessable by the third chapter. It was quite a fun romp throughout but the ending had an abruptly religious tone that felt very out of place. I found it to be disappointing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Briana | 7/8/2011

    " The beginning of the book is admittedly rather misleading...it appears to be a simple argument against anarchy. The rest of the story is a crazy, mindboggling spy comedy! Another amazing Chesterton blend of wisdom and weirdness! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather | 5/2/2011

    " I think I liked it, but... wtf? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 4/29/2011

    " Curious mystery turns into an allegory. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Micha | 4/27/2011

    " A fun romp full of anarchists and private police and Chesterton's sometimes-predictable but other times totally laughingly-absurd humour. The plot follows exactly the kind of course I sometimes wish my life would. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zvi | 4/23/2011

    " Peculiar, funny, and unexpectedly allegorical. The central conceit of the book (infiltrating the anarchist council) is engaging and the prose aphoristic, but the metaphysical ending left me cold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monica | 4/6/2011

    " Weird, and left me thinking. Someone else please read this so I can talk to someone about it.
    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cathy | 4/2/2011

    " There is a reason it is called a nightmare - the confusion could only be justified as a dream. It does get one thinking about anarchy and government. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 aimee | 3/26/2011

    " awesome. just awesome.

    read it _now_ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tyler | 3/25/2011

    " Entertaining and goofy in an English sort of way. I liked it. The twist at the end wasn't as interesting as it could have been. Slightly disappointing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 3/13/2011

    " Well done but a bit dated. I was also put off by the religious aspect of the ending.

    My first e-book! (a free one) "

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About the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936) published numerous works which include compilations of his voluminous journalism, novels, biographies, histories, criticism, Christian apologetics, poetry, and plays. Many of his novels have the genuine marks of genius. His books on Dickens (for whom he had a considerable affinity) and Saint Thomas Aquinas are considered classics in their fields.

About the Narrator

Orson Welles (1915–1985) was an iconic award-winning director, writer, actor, and producer for film, stage, radio, and television. He won the 1941 Academy Award for best original screenplay for Citizen Kane. Known for his baritone voice, he was well regarded as a radio and film actor, a celebrated Shakespearean stage actor, and one of the greatest of film directors.