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Download The Kitchen God's Wife Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Kitchen Gods Wife Audiobook, by Amy Tan
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (34,679 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Amy Tan Narrator: Amy Tan Publisher: Phoenix Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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Winnie Louie and Helen Kwong have always shared secrets, but now Helen wants to reveal them. Helen is convinced she is dying and decides to celebrate what might be her last Chinese New Year by telling all the secrets of her life, as well as Winnie Louie's and those of Winnie's daughter Pearl. There are some things, however, that Pearl would rather her mother didn't know. The result of Helen's tell-all mood is a series of comic misunderstandings and heartbreaking realizations about luck, loss, and trust. In this funny and touching novel Amy Tan reveals important truths about the effect of secrets kept and revealed, and the miraculous, resilient nature of love among mothers, daughters, and friends. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne | 2/20/2014

    " After reading The Joy Luck Club, it is clear that Amy Tan does Asian mother-daughter relationships like no other. So, I was happy to pick up her second novel, The Kitchen God's Wife, and find that she continued with the theme. The book initially takes place in the Bay Area, and focuses on Pearl, the daughter of Chinese immigrant, Winnie. Pearl is suffering from MS, but has not yet told her mother, for fear of worrying her unnecessarily. Winnie, on the other hand, has secrets of her own - about her past in China, a former husband, other children, and a life she thought she left behind decades ago. But, when meddling Aunt Helen, who holds both womens' secrets, decides it is time for mother and daughter to come clean, Winnie begins to tell her story. The remainder of the novel takes the reader back to China to learn about Winnie's difficult beginnings where tragedy upon tragedy mount, and just when you think things couldn't get any worse, of course they do. I found myself incredibly annoyed with the portrayal of children in this novel - as selfish, demanding creatures with no manners - but as the book continued I believe this was intentional on Tan's part - a reminder the subsequent generations are often ignorant of the struggles their mother's have gone through on their behalf, and a window into how their behavior might be altered if they understood sacrifces that had been made for them. I found this book well-written, the plot and characters engaging, and the reflection of the characters on their experience particularly valuable. While difficult to get through at times, an emotionally worthwhile read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sybill ♥ | 2/9/2014

    " Awesome.you need to read this "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tama | 2/9/2014

    " I bought a well worn paperback of this book at the Salvation Army years ago which has lead to a fascination with chinese history-- and a study of the cultural revolution.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Norma | 2/6/2014

    " Amy Tan is an awesome writer. I really enjoyed this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natalie | 2/5/2014

    " I lost momentum about halfway through this book. The beginning was interesting, with the dynamic between the mother and daughter. I hate to say it, but I actually grew tired of reading about how crappy her life was. I know it sounds callous, but I have no respect for a woman who stays with her husband after he maims and then kills her child. Had that been me, I would have gone anywhere, even lived off the streets to get away from that man. The problem was, Weila was so proud and didn't want to lose face or make her family look bad. I can't feel bad for anything that happened to her past that point, because she made poor choices and stayed with Wen Fu. Anyway, it was an okay story and I finally pushed through it. I would like an update as to how the characters are doing now, because this story was written in 1991. Are Pearl and Winnie and the rest still alive? What are Pearl's children doing now? I'd love an update, as the story ends before really resolving the present day problems. Not sure I'd read this one again, as it's way too frustrating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Diana | 2/3/2014

    " I actually read this twice and am ready to read it again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Skeller2483 | 1/28/2014

    " I read this book for our neighborhood book club. It's about a Chinese woman who escaped a bad marriage for something better. Interesting book filled with Chinese beliefs. I enjoyed it and read it in just a few days. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eileen | 1/19/2014

    " This novel is truly epic-a must read for any Asian American female with immigrant parents. Or for anyone who has a generation gap with parents. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gina | 12/12/2013

    " Not bad. The Joy Luck Club is her best I think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tyra | 12/7/2013

    " Another good Amy Tan book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christina | 11/19/2013

    " A good read, as all Amy Tan is. I did struggle a little with the switching narrators. Sometimes I did not feel it was clear who was telling the story, when it switched. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Debbie Duran | 10/10/2013

    " Started out really slow, but got better as it went along. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lyssia | 10/4/2013

    " Amy Tan never lets me down. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melody | 8/6/2013

    " I'm a fan of Amy Tan. I'm sad that it's taking her too long to publish another book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cathy | 5/6/2013

    " The first part of the book had me worried that the whole thing was going to focus on the daughter with MS. Once the focus changed to the mother it was, as I had expected, an awesome read! The depiction of the culture and the upheaval of a people at war on their own soil was gripping. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 2/20/2013

    " Amy tan is a great author. Her books are always interesting and insightful. They are hard to read though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brittney | 1/28/2013

    " Great book that I couldn't put down. A bit hurried at the end, but I still enjoyed it from start to finish. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Asami | 11/18/2012

    " I don`t remember much. But I love her books "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Catherine | 11/13/2012

    " makes me wanna read the joy luck club. i like the way it was written "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marlaina | 5/24/2012

    " This is one of the best books I have the priviledge of reading this year. I personality love how Winnie is telling her story in her own words, adding little hints on bringing you into conversation. This book brought me to tears more than one occasion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna Weaver | 12/3/2011

    " You will learn a great deal about Asian family life and culture. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dee | 10/14/2011

    " Read it, but don't remember much about it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin | 8/14/2011

    " This is my favorite Amy Tan book. I love how adept she is at making you visualize the story she is telling. It is also a commentary on the relevance of women through several generations in China and their metamorphosis with westernization. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andi | 6/30/2011

    " This book makes me want to go back and reread some of Tan's other books that I read in the 90's. I love her style of storytelling. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 6/9/2011

    " We read this book for book club this month and I really enjoyed it. It was both wonderful and heartbreaking. And just when you think it can't get any worse, there is a great love story thrown in to balance it out. And then ultimately with a happy ending. Definitely a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leesie | 6/6/2011

    " A wonderful book, no one does mother-daughter relationships like Amy Tan. Her writing is fabulous. I did have to read some light and fluffy books while reading this, as life in China during WWII with an abusive husband made for some sad reading at times! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 5/24/2011

    " Like Amy Tan's style. Love the way she pulls traditional and contemporary culture into her story lines. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joanne | 5/24/2011

    " I enjoyed this book. Now I want to read "the Joy Luck Club". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shelby | 5/20/2011

    " I'm not finished quite yet, but I do love this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jenopcer | 5/18/2011

    " This book left me shaking when it was over. Extremely well written but the subject was a difficult one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Roxanne | 5/17/2011

    " China gives me romance heart eyes like WHOA. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyssa | 5/16/2011

    " I read this book really feverishly. I think i finished it in a day or two. I think they way that I ached for the main character kept me beside her as each chapter progressed. I think I can relate to the fruitlessness of some of the characters actions, because sometimes that is how life is. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan | 5/15/2011

    " This was a slow starter for me but I really enjoyed it once I got into it. "

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About the Author
Author Amy Tan

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God’s Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, and The Bonesetter’s Daughter, among others. She has also written the children’s books The Moon Lady and Sagwa, which has now been adapted for television by PBS. Tan’s essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, and her work has been translated into thirty-five languages. She lives with her husband in California and New York.