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Download The Journal of the Plague Year: London, 1665 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Journal of the Plague Year: London, 1665 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Daniel Defoe
3.24 out of 53.24 out of 53.24 out of 53.24 out of 53.24 out of 5 3.24 (37 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Daniel Defoe Narrator: Nelson Runger Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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London's Great Plague of 1665 devastated the city, as Europe's final bubonic outbreak killed thousands of helpless citizens. Daniel Defoe, author of the classic Robinson Crusoe, was 5 years old when the Plague swept through London, and grew up hearing many stories - some truthful, others exaggerated - of its deadly effects. Blending those anecdotes with his childhood recollections and factual data from government registers, Defoe wrote this comprehensive account of what happened to London in 1665. Both a harrowing historical novel and a reliable journalistic record, Defoe recreates a living, suffering city trying to cope with an incurable, rapidly spreading disease. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob Young | 2/5/2014

    " Interesting historical fiction about a horrible, horrible time... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Redsteve | 1/24/2014

    " An early docudrama. Daniel DeFoe's fictionalized account of the 1666 Plague of London. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 maven | 1/17/2014

    " Considered as a work of fiction, it's not much of a novel, rambling around and sometimes repeating itself, including some dry details about the numbers of dead (including charts). However, as an account of the plague, written by someone who experienced it, it's pretty fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ebeth | 1/3/2014

    " This is an amazing novel. Because Defoe was born right before the Black Plague spread, he was able to recreate what it was like incredibly realistically with chilling detail. When Defoe wrote the novel, no one knew the cause of the Black Plague, and the fear that it could happen again bleeds through the writing. The sense of helpless confusion in not knowing how a whole family except one member could become sick is harrowing, and the terror and mob mentality in coping with such situations is horrifying. This novel is an excellent view into the nightmare world of the 1650's. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/1/2014

    " I wanted to read this book to find out more about this awful period of history, but hadn't realized it was actually the first "mockumentary" This account of the London plague of 1665 is vivid, grotesque, fascinating, but it is not the memoir of an adult. It's a mix of Defoe's boyhood memories, other people's accounts, in other words, fiction, represented as Defoe's memories. A scary precedent? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt | 1/1/2014

    " A terrifying walk around London during the plague outbreak in 1665. A tough read but worth it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Athena | 12/28/2013

    " Surely Geraldine Brooks read Defoe in the process of researching Year of Wonders. Defoe fights the urge to analyze the plague in terms of his religious beliefs and is left finally with only the powerful sense that he survived. Indeed, and we are grateful for that! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ken | 12/25/2013

    " bummed it's fiction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leslie | 12/21/2013

    " This reads as non-fiction, and offers many insights into the effect, socially and commercially, of the 1665 plague in London. Very worthwhile for students of public health history. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Suzanne | 12/3/2013

    " Generally I'll look over a "classic" if its publishers feel the need to preface it with literary explanations of WHY it is good. I ignored this rule, and more fool me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 momodaisuki | 11/17/2013

    " The book get interesting someway through the middle but the whole I time I wondering, why? Why is this man walking around? Just stay in your house. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Terence | 10/24/2013

    " Bleak and broad in its scope, watch a civilization come close to collapse in this historical fiction. Scary how close some of the reactions from centuries ago sound to reactions of today. Brilliant. Good pairing next to WORLD WAR Z or even THE ROAD "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 10/9/2013

    " A street by street account of the plague's spread in London. What's not to like? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 7/22/2013

    " Dark, harrowing, fictitious retelling of the plague in London in 1665. Worth the read just to see how they handled the situation... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ben B | 7/8/2013

    " Not destined to become a fan favorite, but I happened to check this audiobook out from NetLibrary at the same time as the Diary of Samuel Pepys, so it made for an interesting contrast. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 5/22/2013

    " A narrative of the 1665 plague in London "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janet Oberfoell | 4/14/2013

    " A fascinating look at this time in history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 8/30/2012

    " A man decides to ride out the outbreak of plague in London and records his thoughts in journal form. Dafoe really makes you feel like you're there in the middle of the outbreak with his graphic and detailed descriptions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Luke | 1/21/2012

    " Eh...Daniel Defoe is important because he is the father of the English novel, not because he's particularly good. I read it, it was okay. I'd rather read Swift. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patricrk patrick | 12/9/2011

    " very readable. Gives a glimpse of what it is like to struggle with a deadly disease when you don't have the technology to understand why it is happening. Had to look it up to see it was a novel instead of an actual account. The novel is thought to be based on Defoe's uncle actual journal. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eveline Chao | 11/28/2011

    " I feel like it's morbid to like this, but it was really great and fascinating. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nora | 9/22/2011

    " Unbelievably boring despite an interesting subject "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Serafina Sands | 6/6/2011

    " I read this in college. It's tedious in a way -- one bursting boil after another -- but there's nothing like it to give a feel for the terror and confusion of that time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 5/31/2011

    " I did loose concentration halfway through but it was a well written and factual book! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patricrk | 5/18/2011

    " very readable. Gives a glimpse of what it is like to struggle with a deadly disease when you don't have the technology to understand why it is happening. Had to look it up to see it was a novel instead of an actual account. The novel is thought to be based on Defoe's uncle actual journal. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda | 4/29/2011

    " I hope the plague never hits here! It was in the old days, but must have been a nightmare. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 4/13/2011

    " this guy is wordy. but once you get past that, there's some interesting facts and a few stories. had he been less a walking dictionary, i would've enjoyed it more. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nora | 3/30/2011

    " Unbelievably boring despite an interesting subject "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erika | 3/24/2011

    " Even though it's a fictional journal this book reflects the haunting reality of the plague days. The text meant to be a journal there's no real plot in it but many short stories of victims and comments on the way the disease was handled. Not all that entertaining but very informative. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Solriena | 2/27/2011

    " The book get interesting someway through the middle but the whole I time I wondering, why? Why is this man walking around? Just stay in your house. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristin | 2/8/2011

    " Read for 18th c. print culture. I really enjoy this book, even though it's sort of a strange read, with all its death counts, singular unbroken narrative, and episodic recountings of the plague. There's just something fascinating about the way Defoe reaches back into time with this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ben | 1/29/2011

    " Not destined to become a fan favorite, but I happened to check this audiobook out from NetLibrary at the same time as the Diary of Samuel Pepys, so it made for an interesting contrast. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 D. | 1/14/2011

    " I read this in conjunction with several articles on experiments done on Yersinia Pestis, the notorious black death microbe. That made the read more interesting.

    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Victoria | 1/4/2011

    " This was a bit of a struggle to get through (because of the older style English) but I enjoyed reading one of the first examples of journalistic style fiction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Luckngrace | 11/12/2010

    " Describes the horrible scenes of one personally living through the time of the plague in London. Also recommend Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks if you want to see the plague as it affected small villages. I find it amazing that we can read this account from one who actually lived then. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gwen | 9/6/2010

    " I've spent two or three nights just reading the appendices and introductions. Fascinating to think of Defoe as a journalist way back then. I'm going to have to memorize the street map of London. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will | 8/30/2010

    " So, I guess this book was the first of the genre for historical fiction. Chilling and extremely readable for a 300 year old book. Even-handed and comprehensive description of the social, religious, economic, and personal impact of the 1665 plague of London. "

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About the Author
Author Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe (1660–1731), born in London as Daniel Foe, was a novelist, pamphleteer, journalist, and political spy. He is celebrated for his frank and dramatic realism in fiction and the accuracy, vigor, and lucidity of his journalism. Considered the father of the English novel, he was also the first author of ghost stories in English literature. He is best known for his novels Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders.

About the Narrator

Nelson Runger’s voice has been recorded in dozens of audio productions. His ability to convey difficult, scholarly material with eloquence and ease has earned him critical acclaim, including an AudioFile Best Voice in Biography & History for his reading of Nixon and Kissinger.