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Download The Island of the Day Before Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Island of the Day Before Audiobook, by Umberto Eco
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (6,490 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Umberto Eco Narrator: Tim Curry Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2000 ISBN:
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After a violent storm in the South Pacific in the year 1643, Roberto della Griva finds himself shipwrecked. Swept from the Amaryllis, he has managed to pull himself aboard the Daphne, anchored in the bay of a beautiful island surrounded by treacherous coral reefs. The ship is fully provisioned, he discovers, but the crew is missing. As Roberto explores the vessel and descends into madness, he remembers chapters from his youth: Ferrante, his imaginary evil brother; the siege of Casale, that meaningless chess move in the 30 Years' War in which he lost his father and his illusions; the Aristotelian metaphor machine of Padre Emanuele; the salons of Paris; the theory of the Powder of Sympathy; the approach of his unapproachable Lady, then prison; and finally, the summons of Cardinal Mazarin himself.

In this fascinating, lyrical tale, Umberto Eco tells of an international race to master the seas by unraveling the mysteries of longitude; of a young dreamer searching for love and meaning; and of a most amazing old Jesuit who, with his clocks and maps, has plumbed the secrets of longitude, the depths of the ocean, and the Biblical Flood.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Irene de la Torre | 2/18/2014

    " The prose was good, thought provoking, and sometimes funny. I had to read and re-read some sentences in order for me to understand. I could visualize the protagonist, melancholic in a ship, on a purest blue but rather deserted waters. i liked the idea of one time time zone being just under your reach, but unable to reach it. Umberto was good. But I could not really understand where the story was going. Themes and various sub-themes rather mixed up my simple mind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tim | 2/7/2014

    " I'm sure this book is a great read if one is solely interested dazzled by Eco's erudition, which is staggering by any measure. However, in English, at least, the novel is almost unreadable. Almost every page is taken up with making fun of the Baroque understanding of the universe and the people who tried to apply it practically. Sometimes, this mockery is quite funny. Mostly, I just find it tedious. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 surfurbian | 2/1/2014

    " I was completely confused and missed the point. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eric Knibbs | 1/31/2014

    " Eco's worst book, I think. Still entertaining and original in places, but oddly weak as a whole. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Matt Comito | 1/30/2014

    " If in the Name of the Rose Eco has acheived a fine balance between his love of ideas and his responsibilities as a novelist here he has failed to the detriment of the reader. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Adam | 1/27/2014

    " Definitely my least favorite of his novels. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elizabeth B. | 1/20/2014

    " Wonderful atmosphere--hard to follow. Can't quite remember the "argument" of this one. I guess the guy on the boat is stranded in time on the international dateline. More than that, I just can't say. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gregg | 1/19/2014

    " A wandering, pointless work with a thin plot. I only finished it because it was Eco, and haven't read anything by him since. Did he improve? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jakey | 1/18/2014

    " Really good until the very end and then hard to finish. Read if you like 14th century European Scientific fallacies and the search for longitude. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Zoe Whitecross | 12/19/2013

    " I tried...3 times I tried, but it just didn't grab me at all. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Daryl | 11/30/2013

    " This book was not for me - too much imagery of things I have no knowledge of. And the plot, if there was one, went nowhere. A guy os stuck on a boat because he is too afraid to swim to the adjacent island so he writes about his own history. That was about all I could gather from this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bruce Davis | 11/12/2013

    " I love this book. I've read it twice. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dergrossest | 10/27/2013

    " This is a rough book. Maybe it's brilliant, but I just didn't get it. I just got a headache. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gustavo | 8/31/2013

    " More readable than the Foucaults Pendulum, but still too dense. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 LMW | 3/27/2013

    " One of my favorite Eco books! It is complex, and takes things to a different meaning. His explanation of 'Love conquers all!' is great! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt | 2/6/2013

    " I first read this on a plane and had to re-read it later because that environment just didn't do it justice. As a sequence of events it can seem pretty dry and long-winded, but as an examination of scientific and philosophical beliefs in the time period it's wonderful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zero Jones | 12/21/2012

    " Imagine looking at an island just over the international date line and knowing it was yesterday over there. This book deals with the paradoxes of space and time, while never failing to entertain the reader. A work of lyrical fiction (even when read in translation). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fabiana | 1/16/2012

    " Tortuously erudite, but engrossing. As painful as pleasurable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 11/14/2011

    " Storytelling like spider's web spun around a central tale that is as strange as long. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Melinda | 11/4/2011

    " Goodness, I TRIED, I swear! I just couldn't get that deep into this book before I gave up and said "I'll pass." Very dense writing style, requiring the reader to slave away with a mental machete. Ugh! I wanted to read this because the cover was so beautiful. Dumb, I know... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 7/8/2011

    " This is one of my favorite books--something I will read every few years for many years to come. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Libby | 5/13/2011

    " Great to read in conjunction with Sobel's Latitude "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonfaith | 3/23/2011

    " I read this one in the late 90s, bought a copy for my best friend shortly thereafter. I saw Ray Rizzo with a copy one evening at Ramsi's, I told him I enjoye dit and replied that he was eager. Oh, those 90s! I should reread it quite soon. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Morgan | 2/11/2011

    " All the erudicy and eloquence one invariably expect from the master. However, not very much more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marie-jose | 1/10/2011

    " quite difficult, want to read it again and hope I understand/ remember more of the different stories in it "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeff | 12/12/2010

    " "But is it true, then, that the stone feels nothing but its stoniness?" Puleeeze. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marie | 11/29/2010

    " Loved this book. So haunting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Fanny | 11/14/2010

    " Ricco di idee e curiosità, e non metto in dubbio che Eco riesca qua a ricreare il clima culturale dell’epoca, ma pare scritto da uno che fa il verso a Umberto Eco. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Latifah | 10/27/2010

    " I couldn't finish reading it "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nancy | 10/26/2010

    " I read this back in January of 1997. I remember being intrigued by the concept of an island viewed across the international dateline and the various philosophical musings of the shipwrecked sailor. Can’t remember how it ends though, so maybe I should read it again?? "

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About the Author
Author Umberto EcoUmberto Eco is an Italian semiotician philosopher, literary critic, and novelist. He is the author of The Name of the Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, and The Prague Cemetery, all bestsellers in many languages, as well as a number of influential scholarly works.
About the Narrator

Tim Curry has created a rich array of memorable characters for both the screen and stage, most notably the role of the scientist in the Broadway and film versions of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He’s been nominated for Tony Awards for his roles in My Favorite Year and The Pirates of Penzance. His film credits include Muppet Treasure Island, The Shadow, Clue, Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, The Three Musketeers, and many, many more.