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Extended Audio Sample The House of Mirth Audiobook, by Edith Wharton Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (32,911 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Wharton, Wanda McCaddon Narrator: Wanda McCaddon Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2008 ISBN: 9781400180356
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The beautiful, much-desired Lily Bart has been raised to be one of the perfect wives of the wealthy upper class, but her spark of character and independent drive prevents her from becoming one of the many women who will succeed in those circles. Though her desire for a comfortable life means that she cannot marry for love without money, her resistance to the rules of the social elite endangers her many marriage proposals. As Lily spirals down into debt and dishonor, her story takes on the resonance of classic tragedy.

The House of Mirth is a lucid, disturbing analysis of the stifling limitations imposed upon women of author Edith Wharton’s generation. Born into Old New York Society, Wharton watched as an entirely new set of people living by new codes of conduct entered the metropolitan scene. In telling the story of Lily Bart, Wharton recasts the age-old themes of family, marriage, and money in ways that transform the traditional novel of manners into an arrestingly modern tale of one woman’s struggle to succeed.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 2/19/2014

    " read this on vacation and still cannot believe that someone can make so many bad choices. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 2/17/2014

    " read this on vacation and still cannot believe that someone can make so many bad choices. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kim Perez | 2/15/2014

    " In the same vein of "The Age of Innocence," this book finds the main characters trapped in the confines of their rigid society. What I like about Wharton's books is the women are strong willed and independent. Yet, while rooting for them, I seem to also feel the painful trade-off for their independence: they deny themselves happiness. This book - like "Innocence" - leaves you with an unsettled, uneasy feeling even though the characters come much closer to that happy ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brooke | 2/10/2014

    " I loved the story of Miss Lily Bart. I couldn't wait for my commute to finish the book. The language is very rich and I had to go through some passages 2 or 3 times to completely digest them. It's a beautifully written book from when authors didn't just tell you "this happened, then that happened and so-and-so was pretty." Wharton let's you feel the beauty of words. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christina Winch | 2/8/2014

    " Not exactly what I thought it would be. Instead it was rather long, tedious, and sad... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emilie | 2/7/2014

    " The House of Mirth is beautifully written. The characters are well drawn, and the descriptions of social custom absolutely Austen-esque. It is true that you don't always admire Lily, but in the end you are absolutely moved by her troubles, and you don't want to stop reading. Definitely a class of the period. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maureen Loughnane | 2/7/2014

    " Edith Wharton's insights into society are shockingly brilliant and always so poetic. The House of Mirth was one of the most depressing books I can remember reading - a perfect tragedy of the main character's own making. Makes me very glad to live in an age where a woman can, to some extent, choose the life she wants to lead! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia Carssow | 2/5/2014

    " One of my favorites. The tragdy of this story is Lily Bart's inability to make decisions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alicia | 2/2/2014

    " I loved Book I but Book II took awhile to get into and I found myself trying to rush through to see how it ended. Great read while spending 4 hours on a plane! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert Strandquist | 2/2/2014

    " Lily Bart, like Emma Bovary found herself in a social cage where her song of beauty crackled and expired. Lily's pride and want of genteel grandeur prevented her from all the passions that Emma Bovary exploited. Both women die of their own accord. Mostly I loved Wharton's writing style - detailed but not burdened with it. For example, her descriptions of Lily often contained one physical element, the color of her dress or the line of her arm but mostly Wharton wrote of Lily's effect on a roomful of people or of their perceptions of Lily. In 1905 these psychological impressions were new and controversial as were the painting of Monet, Renoir and Cezanne. Wharton ranks high in my reading experience. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Beverly | 2/1/2014

    " It's been a while since I've read Edith Wharton. I don't know why I waited so long. Sentence by sentence, this book had me in its grip. Lily Bart, the protagonist, is not always likable, nor are her circumstances, but she is plucky, and I had such high hopes for her. Wharton creates well-rounded characters, and a lot of them. I enjoyed reading about NY society and the contrast of the working class world that Lily inevitably encounters. Excellent dip into a world I'll never enter. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kerry | 2/1/2014

    " I read the first half, then skipped to the last 3 chapters. I cared little for Lily Bart and her increasingly dire circumstances. I cared less about her brittle social set. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sydney | 2/1/2014

    " I understand the message that this book was trying to convey, and I also understood that this book was potentially the most beautifully written classic I've ever read in my short 15 years. However, I personally can't find myself enjoying a story full of whiny old men and excessively gossipy old women. I also can't enjoy such a story that I have to read and annotate within 2 weeks for US Literature class. Perhaps I should have have given a beautifully written book more justice. I'll let you know what happens when I reread this in 10 years. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ingrid Lola | 1/31/2014

    " pretty good, but I liked Ethan Frome and The Age of Innocence better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 L | 1/27/2014

    " When many years pass between the readings and re-readings of a book, it's easy to forget how wonderful it is. It's hard to find Lily a fully sympathetic character--she fails to grasp so many shades of reality and opportunity. None the less, the novel is a telling indictment of the emptiness and destruction of women's lives at the hands of "society." What a waste! Wharton is just SO good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nick Duretta | 1/26/2014

    " Tragic tale of a principled woman, beautiful and smart, adrift in early 20th century New York society that values money and leisure and little else. The picture the novel paints of the plights of women, raised to be ornamental but not self-sufficient, could apply to women in a certain strata of society today as well. It's a cautionary tale, well told. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa Vanawken | 1/22/2014

    " really enjoyed this tale, Edith is on of my all time favortie authors "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 1/21/2014

    " Edith Wharton elegantly writes the stark story of the tragically lovely and ambivalent Lily Bart. It is the only novel that I have ever read where the ending is entirely a defeat, for it is not bittersweet and there is no silver lining, but it is about a lesson learned. Lily's lost life IS the lesson for the reader, and her death is the only way to finalize the example she poses for all the faults in the Victorian (technically Edwardian in her time) society. It is still beautiful, because even as she falls from grace, her descent is almost like an elaborately detailed and poignant spiral staircase that spares no missing moments of every step down to the last one. Lily Bart is a very amazing and complex character whose true nature can constantly be debated over, criticized, or marveled at. It is a novel fit for romantics and/or grim realists, because it is exactly those two optional views it offers. When the story is viewed at right down the middle, you realize it is very ambiguous, even before the ending, for many certain things, such as all the possible hypocrisy hidden in every corner. But the ambiguous ending still wraps it up perfectly. It is about a lifetime lost, but its also about all the things that could have been, and thats what makes the book so beguiling and worth reading despite its tragic end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 1/21/2014

    " This book was perhaps the most tragic novel I have read yet. Wharton sets readers up to develop a strong attachment to Lily - she is the representation of what modern feminists would label as a "glass barrier-breaking revolutionary". From the beginning where she is brought simply as a pawn to disguise the affair going on between Bertha and Ned up until the death of her aunt, she is a true rejection from society. Trying to rebuild her faltering reputation, Lily strives to manage the one year that she must wait in order to inherit her aunts' money. Lily's story shows that you can work every job in the book, associate with every European dignitary, and wait for every family member to give you his or her money but it is society's judgement of you that dictates your social standing. When Lily overdosed, I actually had quite a few tears lining the trims of my eyelashes - she was an ostracized, miserable woman who so desperately tried to fit in. She couldn't stand to die a failure - so she paid off her debts and committed suicide. She was about to have everything, a husband: Shelden, who cared for her and some money to start her life over; however her past humiliation proved to be too great of a force. I loved this book and I look forward to perhaps reading the Age of Innocence? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carisa | 1/20/2014

    " One of my favorite books; every word is perfectly chosen. It's a devastating in looking at the choices in life for an intelligent, undereducated, upperclass woman. Lily Bart is a great complex character. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennie | 1/20/2014

    " I didn't hate this book, but I also didn't particularly like it. I'm not a fan of books without some kind of intriguing plot. It definitely wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. Basically, I just don't like the genre and the period of literature and to be honest, the fact that I didn't hate it is as pretty much of a compliment as I can make. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Judy | 1/20/2014

    " One of my all-time favorite novels. This classic features a strong, intelligent, charming heroine who thwarts expectations - she just can't help it. I really identified with her complex, subtly feisty nature. Highly recommend. Another on my must "re-read" list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cindy | 1/18/2014

    " this is one of the books - and authors - that franzen references a lot. since i basically want to live inside of franzen's mind i'm going to give this one a try. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ruth | 1/16/2014

    " Surprisingly readible for something so depressing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caroline | 1/14/2014

    " Hard to read because the protagonist was her own antagonist - totally clueless, made terrible decisions, and basically a waste of space. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jerry Buckley | 1/10/2014

    " I didn't engage enough with this book to finish it. It seemed to me to be a rehash of Anna Karenian, and/or one of the novels of Virginia Woolfe. I just couldn't be bothered with another. Life's too short to read lengthy, mediocre novels. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicola Waldron | 1/10/2014

    " My God, she is just brilliant -- I love everything she wrote. For me, an American Virginia Woolf. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leslie | 1/9/2014

    " I just finished this last night. I'm trying to wrap my head around my feelings for this book. (maybe that's a good thing) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren | 1/8/2014

    " I just finished this book last night and I am still drying my eyes. The reason I gave this book 5 stars was because I was so upset by the ultimate fate of Lily Bart despite the fact that I spent a lot of the time I was reading this book criticizing her, wanting to shake her and tell her to get a grip, save herself, stop wallowing in self pity. I felt very conflicted about her; I wanted her to be better. It felt real. I appreciated all of the social commentary, etc but in the end, I appreciated even more how involved I was with Lily and how much I hoped for things to turn out alright even though she drove me crazy at some points. I felt like I belonged right next to Gerty, crossing my fingers that Lily would somehow find happiness - either by going back to her old life and making a successful marriage or by leaving her old life behind and realizing that life still had much to offer. either way, i think it's hard not to hope for some resolution for a character so clearly conflicted. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ruth | 1/7/2014

    " Surprisingly readible for something so depressing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caren | 1/6/2014

    " Loved it. I think Lily purposely took her life. Life was just too dismal and she didn't see in hope. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan Clark-cook | 1/6/2014

    " A good read, and good study of her time and the position of women in the world at that point in time. I've read this several times and each time is as interesting, yet sad, as the first time I read it. Also made into a good movie, very moving, and again, sad. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Philicia | 1/3/2014

    " Great slice of life of New York high society in the 1900's. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jossalyn | 1/2/2014

    " for westridge alum book club "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 12/27/2013

    " Lily Bart had so many things to learn about her life. I loved the book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lauren | 12/27/2013

    " Hmmm...didn't love this. I appreciate the eloquence of Wharton's diction and the sophistication of her style, but I found it a bit Victorian and tedious, and I knew what would happen at the end of the story from its first page. I think I'm all Whartoned out for a while "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jolene | 12/19/2013

    " Second Edith Wharton I've read (audio) in the last month! I liked this quite a bit more than The Age of Innocence. I don't think it would be a top choice for Cory or Bryan though! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meagan | 12/18/2013

    " This book just ate me alive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Patricia | 12/16/2013

    " Ok, this is just a Victorian soap opera. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 12/15/2013

    " This book was excellent! Very sensitive to the plight of women during the time period. I couldn't put it down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Allie | 12/14/2013

    " Too long and overdrawn. Interesting look at life with the nouveux riche in NYC, but could have been shorter. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kayla Shifrin | 12/14/2013

    " This is a perfect novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tina | 12/12/2013

    " Loving Jane Austen as I do, this book was great food for my love of this kind of intense look at society and its characters...but a sad portrayal of the trap of society for a woman of no independent means. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jan | 12/11/2013

    " Things aren't always what they seem. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lovescaleb | 12/10/2013

    " One of the best books that depict the torments between Victorian women and New Women. You have to wonder if Lily (view spoiler)[meant to kill herself or if it was an accident. (hide spoiler)]. Women marrying for love instead of sustinence was just around the century. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 LiLee | 12/8/2013

    " Although this book is quit depression, it really shows how strong a woman can be. In the end, she succumbs to her own pride but she proved that woman can be independent and make unconventional choices for that time. It was a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elaina | 12/7/2013

    " This is my favorite novel by Edith Wharton. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christopher | 11/28/2013

    " Well written and can frame up past cultural norms so one could appreciate the issues facing Lilly. However one sees a train wreck commingled and by the time it crashes you are glad to get it over with and let the story progress. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 11/26/2013

    " Beautiful insight delivered with poetry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sara | 11/23/2013

    " Ashamed to say I hadn't read this yet, as now it's an obsession. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tiffany | 10/26/2013

    " I thought the writing was beautiful. As for the story itself, i felt that it dragged at times. I was torn in liking lily as a character. But I felt that towards the end I truly cam to care for her and feel terrible as to her demise. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Al | 9/27/2013

    " I am certainly becoming a big fan of Edith Wharton and was quite engrossed in this book, but as usual these days, I was very disappointed by the ending. I'm looking forward to the discussion here next week. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mike | 7/31/2013

    " Lily Bart, Selden The fall from grace of a New York socialite around the turn of the century. Wah Wah Wah try living with two Llasa Apso's "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chase | 7/3/2013

    " Great language. Terrible, anachronistic ending. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christina Winch | 6/28/2013

    " Not exactly what I thought it would be. Instead it was rather long, tedious, and sad... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maria Mangano | 5/31/2013

    " Edith Wharton. Need I say more? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tracy Kendall | 4/5/2013

    " I read that Age of Innocence was Wharton's apology to society for her portrayal of marriage in House of Mirth. After reading Mirth, I don't understand why she felt the apology was needed. Sad glimpse into the pressures and manipulations of Victorian society. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amie | 2/19/2013

    " I just love this author! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth Myers | 2/17/2013

    " Excellent read. Written at the turn of the century, so the storyline is a bit frustrating due to the social mores being so different from today.Enjoyed the character studies, the relationships between the characters and the world of the "idle rich" before the Great Depression. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 tanya | 12/9/2012

    " I freaking loved this book. It was so depressing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gwyn | 10/11/2012

    " Amazing. I loved the story and found her writing to be at least on the same level as Austen's but more accessible. Couldn't put it down once I started. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rob Roy | 8/29/2012

    " Set in New York City of the 1890's, this is a story of what happens when a woman does not guard her reputation. It also speaks of the damage caused by gossip. A great essay on the morality and social institutions of the day. This is a sad tale at best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 8/19/2012

    " Lily Bart had so many things to learn about her life. I loved the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ana Farrish | 8/14/2012

    " I wish I could give this book a thousand stars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alice Ayden | 7/15/2012

    " Hard to go many pages without highlighting some gem she's said. A true writer. Insightful, unafraid and unapologetic. The entire story was depressing, but her writing elevated it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 5/8/2012

    " I thought this was an incredibly moving, sad commentary on manners, money, rank and position and the plight of women in the Gilded Age. This is a must-read for all thinking females. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 4/13/2012

    " Even though this book is a tragedy, I enjoyed it so much more than Age of Innocence. She was a woman of character in difficult circumstances while the heroine of A of I is so manipulative and shallow. It leaves one feeling that the story is concluded. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dandebbie | 3/17/2012

    " About the beautiful Lily Bart and traversing the social mores of the Gilded Age. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jscorse | 1/19/2012

    " Tale of self-destruction in a loveless society. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 12/10/2011

    " Kind of pathetic ending, but a sweet approach. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carolyn | 10/29/2011

    " Love Wharton's writing, although as she was a privileged intellectual the anti-semitism in the book was a bit surprising. Loved Ethan Frome; Age of Innocence is on my 'maybe someday' list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna Halloran | 9/11/2011

    " I really loved this. It was long and a little complex - I got lost with the characters sometimes. I didn't see the end coming until almost there so it was depressing. I could actually see myself reading this again one day. I can't wait to see a movie version of this! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carisa | 8/15/2011

    " One of my favorite books; every word is perfectly chosen. It's a devastating in looking at the choices in life for an intelligent, undereducated, upperclass woman. Lily Bart is a great complex character. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Celina | 7/24/2011

    " This is beautifully written, and Edith Wharton certainly knew her way around a human emotion. The insights are dazzling at times. But Lily Bart, if not as loathsome as most of the people around her, is still very hard to like, and the plot is pure manipulation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 6/23/2011

    " This book was excellent! Very sensitive to the plight of women during the time period. I couldn't put it down. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sara | 5/22/2011

    " I thought this book was okay. The main character was so wishy washy that I was constantly yelling at her in my head throughout this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shannon | 5/20/2011

    " Who doesn't love a book about the lives of the upper class? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gina | 5/9/2011

    " Holy crap, what a story. And a vocab lesson, in the best possible way. Edith Wharton is one of those authors I categorized in college as being too second wave, but I was wrong, she was her own wave, and Ms. Bart brings it home in a stunning way. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Klymene | 5/5/2011

    " it was boring long and the end was throughly disapointing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 4/22/2011

    " Loved it! I can't believe it took me until age 32 to read Edith Wharton...Poor Lily. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 4/22/2011

    " MY. FAVORITE. BOOK. EVER. So complicated, yet so simple. I have read this book more than ten times and loved it more each time. Still extremely relevant, as Lily Bart struggles against the limitations on women's choices and refuses to accept compromises until it is too late. Triumphant. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sherry | 4/21/2011

    " Wharton is just brilliant. I love her individual sentences.

    This particular story has a dark bite, but I adored reading it. Although I knew the premise of the story, the way she brings everything about wasn't expected, though felt natural. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristi | 4/20/2011

    " Beautifully written but what a depressing read. Unfortunately, there was little redeeming about the protagonist, Lily Bart. I much preferred "Age of Innocence." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caren | 4/13/2011

    " Loved it. I think Lily purposely took her life. Life was just too dismal and she didn't see in hope. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katrina | 4/13/2011

    " I loved this story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 4/13/2011

    " For me, this is one of those books that can only be appreciated after reflection. While reading it - I hated it. "

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About the Author
Author Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.

About the Narrator

Wanda McCaddon (a.k.a. Nadia May or Donada Peters) has narrated well over six hundred titles for major audiobook publishers, has earned numerous Earphones Awards, and was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine.