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Download The House of Mirth Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The House of Mirth Audiobook, by Edith Wharton
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (32,970 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Wharton Narrator: Joanna Cassidy Publisher: Audio Holdings, LLC Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2009 ISBN:
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The House of Mirth is centered on Lily Bart, a New York socialite who attempts to secure a husband and a place in affluent society. It was one of the first novels of manners to emerge in American literature. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joel | 1/29/2014

    " I really liked this, a lot more than I was expecting to. I don't think it's a book for everyone; you have to have a certain tolerance for detailed descriptions of a society where the littlest gesture could mean the world and where rivers of emotion are repressed beneath a calm exterior of good manners and proper behavior. Still, there's drama here to connect to: social expectations and the roles we paint ourselves into; the economic realities that knock down or put up walls in our lives; the conflict between self-image and public perceptions. Wharton has an eye for detail, and Lily's slow descent is both heart-wrenching and infuriating because it happens in such slow degrees that it seems she should be able to stop it and turn back at any moment. I'm glad one of my students picked this as her "novel to study" this year. I don't think I would have picked it up on my own, but I'm glad I read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrea | 12/13/2013

    " The story of Lily Bart is a story about how a young woman slips through the cracks of society and finds herself on the outside due to the poor choices she makes. There is also an excellent movie with Gillian Anderson as Lily. Edith Wharton is one of my favourite novelists. Wharton was considered a masterful novelist. Even her second novel shows her true talent. She is an inspiration to me as a writer. This was the second time I have read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alexandra Tarzia | 12/12/2013

    " One of my all time favorites "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kimberly | 12/11/2013

    " I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Had never read anything by Wharton (okay, maybe a short story in lit class in high school or college). She is quite a writer, creating full characters that are complex, not easy to love OR hate, but must be loved AND disliked. It's a quick read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shmendrick | 12/6/2013

    " I first came across Edith Wharton because of Ethan Frome and, while I think that Ethan Frome is better in terms of plot, I think the writing style is still as lovely. Lily got on my nerves at the beginning but as her situation worsened she slowly became more sympathetic to me as a character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elyse Kelly | 11/25/2013

    " Apart from the fact that I liked it and, once fairly into it, couldn't put it down, House of Mirth broadened my understanding of what a novel of manners could scope. Previously, an unhappy marriage was the worst fate I thought could befall I protagonist in a novel of manners. Ms. Wharton showed me otherwise. In addition, it showed me further just how human and faulty a protagonist can be portrayed and still elicit sympathy and empathy from the reader. I identified with Lily Barton in more ways than I wanted to admit. Her age (nearly thirty) also grabbed my attention and helped acclimate my writer's senses to admitting older heroines into my protagonist age-range possibilities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Faith Justice | 9/30/2013

    " I like Wharton's writing and think I would have enjoyed this one more except for the current times. The story is about the endeavors of a beautiful young woman to stay in the social circles her birth entitles her to, but her increasing impoverishment makes more and more difficult. I admired the heroine Lily Bart in her efforts to "keep up" while sabotaging her marriage prospects out of a personal sense of honor and secret abhorrence for her useless life. However, I had little sympathy for her or her troubles or her friends. The troubles of the idle rich seem trite and boring...which I think was Wharton's point, but didn't make for compelling reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Camilla Lombard | 9/29/2013

    " Who recommended this to me? Thank you!! It is brilliant. Her descriptions of social code and etiquette are searing, what a master of psychology. Damn, woman, you slay me!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eva | 8/12/2013

    " After reading Eugenides new 'The Marriage Plot' I had this craving for Victorian novels. If they have unhappy endings, even better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amie | 12/31/2012

    " I just love this author! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kat | 11/30/2012

    " Bored me to tears! I really wanted to like it... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yuliana | 10/20/2012

    " What a jewel of a book! The writing is exquisite. It's Charles Dickens meets Jane Austen. I am definitely going to read it again, soon. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 10/6/2012

    " Time is running out for 29 year-old Lily to find a husband. It's easy to see why this became a classic. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark Zockoll | 9/8/2012

    " Wharton, as a woman, couldn't present the world as Norris could in McTeague, but her understanding and representation of society is no less scathing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bekah | 7/28/2012

    " A classic must read, great writing "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah Ryburn | 6/14/2012

    " one of the first books i really loved that didn't have a happy ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Miao | 9/15/2011

    " The story is kind of old but the writing is wonderful. I love how Edith's choices of words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 8/17/2011

    " I LOVED this book. Lily's tragic story is moving and thought provoking. A really interesting insight into life for 19th century American women. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kiessa | 7/20/2011

    " There is nothing more to say about Wharton's work that hasn't already been said. I love, love, love it!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rhi | 5/27/2011

    " Re-read this again - I really enjoyed it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sara | 5/22/2011

    " I thought this book was okay. The main character was so wishy washy that I was constantly yelling at her in my head throughout this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shannon | 5/20/2011

    " Who doesn't love a book about the lives of the upper class? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gina | 5/9/2011

    " Holy crap, what a story. And a vocab lesson, in the best possible way. Edith Wharton is one of those authors I categorized in college as being too second wave, but I was wrong, she was her own wave, and Ms. Bart brings it home in a stunning way. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Klymene | 5/5/2011

    " it was boring long and the end was throughly disapointing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 4/22/2011

    " Loved it! I can't believe it took me until age 32 to read Edith Wharton...Poor Lily. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 4/22/2011

    " MY. FAVORITE. BOOK. EVER. So complicated, yet so simple. I have read this book more than ten times and loved it more each time. Still extremely relevant, as Lily Bart struggles against the limitations on women's choices and refuses to accept compromises until it is too late. Triumphant. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sherry | 4/21/2011

    " Wharton is just brilliant. I love her individual sentences.

    This particular story has a dark bite, but I adored reading it. Although I knew the premise of the story, the way she brings everything about wasn't expected, though felt natural. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristi | 4/20/2011

    " Beautifully written but what a depressing read. Unfortunately, there was little redeeming about the protagonist, Lily Bart. I much preferred "Age of Innocence." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caren | 4/13/2011

    " Loved it. I think Lily purposely took her life. Life was just too dismal and she didn't see in hope. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katrina | 4/13/2011

    " I loved this story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 4/13/2011

    " For me, this is one of those books that can only be appreciated after reflection. While reading it - I hated it. "

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About the Author
Author Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.