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Download The Great Omission: Reclaiming Jesus's Essential Teachings on Discipleship Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Great Omission: Reclaiming Jesuss Essential Teachings on Discipleship (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Dallas Willard
3.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 5 3.93 (27 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Dallas Willard Narrator: Grover Gardner Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2009 ISBN:
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The last command Jesus gave the church before he ascended to heaven was the Great Commission, the call for Christians to make disciples of all the nations.

But Christians have responded by making Christians, not disciples. This, according to brilliant scholar and renowned Christian thinker Dallas Willard, has been the church's Great Omission. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Justin | 1/17/2014

    " Willard has some great points, but the fact that the book's a collection of occasional pieces means he never gets into as much depth as I'd like (saying "I wish I had time to go into ____" just means you fill out your speech for the book, not that you keep it brief) and that some of the passages are repetitious. When he's on, he nails it, but this work seems more suited for fans of his, as it seems his other books explore these subjects (primarily spiritual formation) more deeply. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 1/5/2014

    " The Great Omission is about Christian discipleship and the lack of it in American Christians. It is a collection of Willard's lectures and writings on the topic - this makes the chapters more self-contained, does involve some repetition, but also allows easy dipping in and out of the book. This made it easier to listen to as an audiobook as well (thank you Christianaudio). Willard's point is that Christian's are born into a life, conversion is not a one instant and done. He emphasizes the disciplines (especially silence and solitude), as he always does, and sustained work by the Christian (as he says grace is opposed to earning and not to effort). Accepting the format of a volume of lectures, my one complaint about Willard's excellent discussion of discipleship here is that it feels individualized and does not say much about the church. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryan Burkey | 1/3/2014

    " I have 3 or 4 books that are always on my nightstand that I reference and read throughout the year, sometimes throughout the week. The Great Omission will be joining those 3 or 4 old familiar friends. Amazing, life-shaking book! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Linda Bowling | 12/11/2013

    " Very hard to read. Repetitive. Good point, but really, it's a single point. Poor editing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karlysu | 12/10/2013

    " Still reading. This book is a compilation of articles and speeches previously published so you can pick and choose. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 12/4/2013

    " This was my first introduction to Dallas Willard, and I found the book very helpful in my understanding of spiritual disciplines and what discipleship means. The book has some repetition to it, perhaps a bit too much. Willard gives a good introduction and explanation of discipleship and how spiritual disciplines play a part in that. His commentary on the books that have been instrumental in his own life is a valuable resource. If you aren't practicing spiritual disciplines, it is probably because you don't understand them... at least that has been my story. This book is a helpful push in the right direction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 11/12/2013

    " Jesus told his disciples to make disciples. What in the world did he mean? Unfortunately the term discipleship carries a lot of baggage. Willard makes discipleship clear, although never simple. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dora | 11/11/2013

    " The driving message of this book was wonderful, the execution a bit lacking. The book read rather choppy, at times, as a collection of essays as opposed to a cohesive unit. Redundant at times with poor flow. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bob Jackson | 10/6/2013

    " Dynamite. It will change your thinking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Henry Jin | 8/31/2013

    " Good, but somewhat repetitive and not all that organized. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne Aker | 8/2/2013

    " A challenge to truly allow Jesus to guide you in his way...to help you grow in likeness to Him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 7/13/2013

    " The book is a compilation of smaller articles, so as long as you are ok reading a collective work, then I would really recommend this book. Practical in theology, filled with things to highlight and mull over. Overall, great thought (and hopefully, action) provoking book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Missyjohnson1 | 1/23/2013

    " a little difficult to stay focused on this one. seemed to be written for Clergy more than lay "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 10/15/2012

    " This is an easy to read call to rediscover discipleship in the Christian Church. It is a thought provoking read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Anderson | 10/12/2012

    " Do you take time to do nothing? Rest in God in prayer and fasting? Have difficulty with doing nothing in His presence except to enjoy Him? Then read this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Hardin | 2/22/2012

    " Love willard lots of good stuff here but not his best book "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frank Peters | 2/8/2012

    " Willard writes things that I need to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 12/26/2011

    " A great book and an easy read compared to some of his other stuff. Deals with the issue that we may become "Christians" without becoming disciples of Christ. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joy | 7/27/2011

    " I'm reading this book now and I love it. He has a great explanation of the interaction of works and grace. Quote: "Grace is not opposed to effort, it is opposed to earning. Earning is an attitude. Effort is an action. Grace, you know, does not just have to do with forgiveness of sins alone." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jenn Raley | 7/24/2011

    " Though this book is a compilation of lots of Willard's writings and other teachings, and can therefore be a bit repetitive, the message could not be more important. I highly recommend that any Jesus-follower read this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Scott | 7/10/2011

    " Exceedingly repetitive. By the third chapter he had said all he was going to say and nothing new or helpful followed. Don't buy this...borrow it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom Golding | 4/26/2011

    " Excellent, thought-provoking, vital. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy Utley | 12/19/2010

    " i like where he's headed, but i wish he had a little more conviction about the thesis (and its implications on our salvation). this would be an important book if he didn't undermine himself with slight waffling... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Henry | 10/29/2009

    " Good, but somewhat repetitive and not all that organized. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 8/12/2009

    " i like where he's headed, but i wish he had a little more conviction about the thesis (and its implications on our salvation). this would be an important book if he didn't undermine himself with slight waffling... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 1/26/2009

    " Jesus told his disciples to make disciples. What in the world did he mean? Unfortunately the term discipleship carries a lot of baggage. Willard makes discipleship clear, although never simple. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne | 4/5/2008

    " A challenge to truly allow Jesus to guide you in his way...to help you grow in likeness to Him. "

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About the Author
Author Dallas Willard

Dallas Willard (1935–2013) was a professor at the University of Southern California’s School of Philosophy for forty-seven years. His groundbreaking books The Divine Conspiracy and The Spirit of the Disciplines forever changed the way thousands of Christians experience their faith.

About the Narrator

Grover Gardner (a.k.a. Tom Parker) is an award-winning narrator with over eight hundred titles to his credit. Named one of the “Best Voices of the Century” and a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine, he has won three prestigious Audie Awards, was chosen Narrator of the Year for 2005 by Publishers Weekly, and has earned more than thirty Earphones Awards.