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Download The God Virus: How Religion Infects Our Lives and Culture Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The God Virus: How Religion Infects Our Lives and Culture (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Darrel Ray
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (15 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Darrel Ray Narrator: Darrel Ray Publisher: Dogma Debate, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2012 ISBN:
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What makes religion so powerful? How does it weave its way into our political system? Why do people believe and follow obvious religious charlatans? What makes people profess deep faith even as they act in ways that betray that faith? What makes people blind to the irrationalities of their religion yet clearly see those of others? If these questions interest you, this book will give you the tools to understand religion and its power in you, your family and your culture.

For thousands of years, religion has woven its way through societies and people as if it were part and parcel to that society or person. In large measure it was left unexplained and unchallenged, it simply existed. Those who attempted to challenge and expose religion were often persecuted, excommunicated, shunned, or even executed. It could be fatal to explain that which the church, priest, or imam said was unexplainable. Before the germ, viral, and parasite theory of disease, physicians had no tools to understand disease and its propagation. Priests told people disease was a result of sin, Satan, evil spirits, etc.

With the discovery of microbial actors, scientists gained new tools to study how it spreads. They could study infection strategies, immunity, epidemiology and much more. Suddenly the terrible diseases of the past were understandable. The plagues of Europe, yellow fever, small pox, pneumonia, tuberculosis, syphilis, etc. were now removed from the divine and placed squarely in the natural world.

This book owes a great deal to Richard Dawkins' concept of viruses of the mind, but it seeks to go a step further to personalize the concept of religion as a virus and show how these revolutionary ideas work in everyday life. The paradigm can explain the fundamentalism of your Uncle Ned, the sexual behavior of a fallen megachurch minister, the child rearing practices of a Pentecostal neighbor, why 19 men flew planes into the World Trade Center, or what motivates a woman to... Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mikel Hensley | 2/15/2014

    " It's a simple, straight forward application of meme theory to religion. It is very helpful for understanding one's own religious experience and why religious differences in a family can cause the strife and division that they do. It also has great applications toward understanding why religious groups seem dead set on integrating themselves with American culture and law. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leondre | 1/20/2014

    " Very interesting and thought provoking book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shanika | 12/17/2013

    " The author uses "virus" as an analogy to show how religion spreads from person to person, generation to generation and culture to culture. Great for those interested in how religion works in the minds of people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Milo | 11/25/2013

    " vitriolic even by my standards and noticeably self congratulatory. There is valuable information on offer here, the only issue is you may have to sift through plenty of dubious narrative to find it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Pederson | 10/5/2013

    " compares the religious meme to a virus, interesting take. and it really shows me why religious leaders want to stop education and critical thinking. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer | 8/26/2013

    " It was good but to redundant. Kept saying the same thing over and over and over just using different examples. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard | 7/17/2013

    " This is a super book. Wonderfully readable, it's the only in depth analysis of the dynamics of religion that I have ever read that is actually fun and not a chore to wade through. Also, ages twelve and up can appreciate and comprehend everything in it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sheila | 7/3/2013

    " Beware, this book causes bouts of rational thinking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd | 5/12/2013

    " Intriguing argument. I'm not certain that as a theory of religion it works accross the board. But, the analogy works well enough to be useful from a sociological perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Coloradobob | 5/8/2013

    " This book is perhaps the most simple and straight forward explanation of how the insanity of religion in an age of knowledge is able to propagate. The medical analogy to a virus is right on the mark. Now all we need is an inoculation to cure this disease. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa Larson | 3/24/2013

    " Well done, easy to read. It makes sense to compare belief in god & viruses. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 1/20/2013

    " A very interesting read. I liked it better than his "God and Sex" book, although both are great. I would highly recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 1/14/2013

    " A good and consistent comparison of the infectious processes that spread physical and psychological diseases. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tamara | 1/1/2013

    " The concept of this book is excellent, but unfortunately the author is not a great writer. He repeats many ideas, and leaves others completely unsupported. I really wanted this book to be a million times better than it was. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin Doohan | 12/3/2012

    " Nice followup read for people who enjoyed The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins or similar works. Describing religion as a virus with the main goal being to protect and propogate the virus really encouraged deeper thought for me about my thoughts on religion. "

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