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Download The Ghosts of Cannae: Hannibal and the Darkest Hour of the Roman Republic Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Ghosts of Cannae: Hannibal and the Darkest Hour of the Roman Republic (Unabridged), by Robert L. O’Connell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (478 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Robert L. O’Connell Narrator: Alan Sklar Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2010 ISBN:
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Hannibal's battle plan at Cannae became the mother of all great battle strategies - the first battle of encirclement that has been imitated (often to disastrous effect) endlessly over the past two thousand years. In this brilliant, long-overdue, and beautifully written account, Robert L. O'Connell gives listeners an epic account of one of the most dramatic battles of antiquity.

The Ghosts of Cannae is at once a book about a specific battle (the massive defeat of a huge but inexperienced Roman army in southern Italy by Hannibal in 216 BC) and also an interpretation of the larger course of the Second Punic War, as well as an assessment of the historical impact of Rome's storied rivalry with Carthage. What ties the book together is the fate of the survivors, their treatment by the authorities in Rome, and ultimately their vindication nearly two decades later, when they defeated Hannibal at the decisive battle of Zama in North Africa. With an unforgettable cast of heroes and villains, The Ghosts of Cannae is history at its finest. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin Williams | 2/18/2014

    " The author does not know how to use the words "proverbial" or "literally,"but apart from that, it's an engrossing and critical look at Rome and Carthage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave | 2/8/2014

    " Good book about Hannibal and the 2nd Punic war with Rome. Interesting insights into battle formations and strategies. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Nelson | 2/1/2014

    " A fascinating history of the greatest battle of annihilation and its aftermath. The battle was Cannae, where a Carthaginian army of about 50,000 soldiers defeated a better-equipped Roman army of 80,000, killing over 7/8 of the Romaan soldiers in the process. It was the high-water mark of Carthaginian military might, but turned in to the ultimate Pyhrric victory. The Carthaginian general Hannibal failed to follow up on the triumph by marching on Rome, the Romans raised another army, and Hannibal never again was able to threaten Rome's existence, though he did continue to operate in Italy for a number of years. Rome developed a deep-seated fear and hatred of Carthage after its epic defeat, which ultimately led to the total destruction of Carthage after the Third Punic War. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoff | 1/15/2014

    " Really good look at the battles between Hannibal and Rome. A lot of interesting context about both Rome and Carthage. You're guaranteed to like this if you're a Roman history nerd, and if not you'll probably like it anyway, just a bit less. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 George Combs | 1/10/2014

    " A well written look into the crisis that was Hannibal for the Roman Republic. A good history well told. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 1/7/2014

    " O'Connell did an excellent job of creating a narrative from incomplete and biased sources without attempting to hide the shortcomings of those sources. He also put the battle which forms the centerpiece of the book into its historical context in such a way that made his conjectures about its effects on the development of the later Roman Empire quite plausible. I enjoyed his comparisons of the Punic Wars to modern historical events and found the book well written and a pleasure to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janis Williams | 12/22/2013

    " I pre-read this book as a service to my son who received it for Christmas. It is full of life-giving minutia and also many handy facts about Hannibal and how the Romans set their battle plans. But there was something about this writer's style that tired me out. It was sort of cinematic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James White | 11/17/2013

    " I'm a sucker for these big battles from history stories. The battle itself takes very little, the buildup, the aftermath, the coincidences, and the politics are engrossing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gordon | 10/23/2013

    " I was turned onto this book by Bill Davis. If you're a history buff, this is a wonderful non-fiction about the greatest general of all time, Hannibal and the reasons why Romans sowed salt in the fields of Carthage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ian | 10/12/2013

    " A very readable account of the battle of Cannae, and indeed of the Second Punic War. I really enjoyed it "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 6/9/2012

    " "Outstanding writing and analysis." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Luaba | 3/27/2012

    " One of the best book I've ever read on Hannibal the Hun. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jamison Shuck | 1/28/2012

    " Good not great book, meticulously researched, a little too much time spent on the "ghosts" metaphor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bruce | 11/9/2011

    " Very well written book. O'Connell has a dry sense of humor that enlivens the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jp Miceli | 7/16/2011

    " This is a great book about Rome and Hannibal. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roger | 3/1/2011

    " The first 100 pages felt like a reading assignment but it picked up after that. If you have more than a passing interest in military strategy and ancient Rome you will enjoy this book about a seminal military battle. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin | 1/29/2011

    " The author does not know how to use the words "proverbial" or "literally,"but apart from that, it's an engrossing and critical look at Rome and Carthage.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janis | 1/13/2011

    " I pre-read this book as a service to my son who received it for Christmas. It is full of life-giving minutia and also many handy facts about Hannibal and how the Romans set their battle plans. But there was something about this writer's style that tired me out. It was sort of cinematic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darosenthal | 1/7/2011

    " Exciting and informative. Hannibal and Scipio Africanus pop off the page in this badass piece of academic military history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric | 1/4/2011

    " I like all things Roman history. This was a really interesting history focused on Hannibal's terrorizing of Italy, the peak of which was the battle of Cannae and the aftermath of that battle. I enjoyed this a great deal. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jp | 11/28/2010

    " This is a great book about Rome and Hannibal. "

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