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Download The George Bernard Shaw Collection (Dramatized) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The George Bernard Shaw Collection (Dramatized) Audiobook, by George Bernard Shaw
3.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 53.86 out of 5 3.86 (37 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: George Bernard Shaw Narrator: Shirley Knight, Anne Heche, JoBeth Williams, Richard Dreyfuss, Bruce Davison, Kate Burton, Roger Rees Publisher: L.A. Theatre Works Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2011 ISBN:
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Eight of George Bernard Shaw's most memorable plays in one splendid collection:

Mrs. Warren's Profession: Shaw pits a clever heroine against a memorable gallery of rogues in this superbly intelligent and still shocking comedy, which was banned for eight years from the English stage after its London debut. Performed by Shirley Knight, et al.

Arms and the Man: The beautiful, headstrong Raina awaits her fiancé's return from battle - but instead meets a soldier who seeks asylum in her bedroom. Performed by Anne Heche, et al.

Candida: Shaw's warm and witty play challenged conventional wisdom about relationships between the sexes, as a beautiful wife must choose between the two men who love her. Performed by JoBeth Williams, et al.

The Devil's Disciple: A young hero who disdains heroism makes the ultimate sacrifice for honor and country during the American Revolution. Performed by Richard Dreyfuss, et al.

Major Barbara: This sparkling comedy traverses family relations, religion, ethics and politics - as only Shaw, the master dramatist, can! Performed by Kate Burton, Roger Rees, et al.

The Doctor's Dilemma: A well-respected physician is forced to choose whom he shall save: a bumbling friend or the ne'er-do-well husband of the woman he loves. Performed by Martin Jarvis, Paxton Whitehead, et al.

Misalliance: A self-made millionaire and his family invite their future in-law for a visit to their estate. In this delightfully clever play, issues of gender, class, politics, and family are all targets for Shaw's keen wit. Performed by Roger Rees, Eric Stoltz, et al.

Pygmalion: Shaw's beloved play about an irascible speech professor who decides to mold a Cockney flower girl into the darling of high society. Performed by Shannon Cochran, et al.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kkinugawa | 2/18/2014

    " Perhaps one of the most famous books in United Kingdom. The book is known as model of movie called "pretty woman", and you basically are able to see one little poor girl is going to develop as a lady throughout the story. While the movie version of this book is also famous, I still would recommend this book even though if you have already watched the movie since the some of the part in the story and ending are different. That the book is absolutely enjoyable, and therefore I would recommend this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karthik | 2/12/2014

    " Amazing.I had to read it for my coursework and it is the first time i realized i saw an experiment with a human subject.Its so entertaining at the moment i never realized how it was a mocking of the judgement criteria people had for distinguishing between classes.In that case the whole experiment was revolutionary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 2/7/2014

    " It was nice to find the origins of My Fair Lady. I think I liked this outcome better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Millicent Ashby | 1/26/2014

    " Had to read it for class, but it is good nonetheless. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jon | 1/25/2014

    " clever, point not immediately clear, at least not to me, but boring in many parts, 3 only because of some of the clever development. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 1/23/2014

    " A bit confusing at times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erica | 1/13/2014

    " Higgins, a phonologist, reforms Eliza DooLittle from a low-born flower girl into a lady. He routinely fails in social situations, unable to understand people as feeling beings, and he fails in this too with Eliza. They fall in love with each other, but Eliza cannot conceive of marrying Higgins, who is as a god to her--her own Pygmalion. Higgins realizes, too late, that Eliza is not entirely his own creation, but a person whose feelings and thoughts are indepedent of his manipulation. Eliza marries Freddy and lives a money-poor middle class life. Tension between classes (expressed through dialect differences, which Higgins trains out of people). Important depiction of the "mass": Eliza's father becomes "respectable" against his will--he would rather drink away all his money rather than have the burden of "middle class morality" but an American bequeaths all his money to Mr. Doolittle, in response to Higgins's joke that Doolittle is the best lower class philosopher around. Americans don't heed class, you see, but reward merit where it's found (itself a kind of ignorance/writing over of the lower classes' will and desires...but again, this plays into a rigid idea of class difference, somewhat similar to identity arguments based on ethnicity or nationality). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Phoebe Mogarei | 1/5/2014

    " The 'sequel' at the end was the best part. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Beowulfwulf | 12/22/2013

    " Hilarious and profound at the same time. I love Eliza and that old bachelor Higgins. Opposites attract, right? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hagar | 12/22/2013

    " a definite Classic! :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Asyoulikeit | 11/28/2013

    " for the sake of love/romantic thoughts don't read the descriptive part found at the end :) my rating 8,5/10 "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karin | 11/7/2013

    " Got this free from Amazon on my Kindle.What a surprise to rediscover the story and remembering the movie from so many years ago,a true classic.every way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dottie | 10/16/2013

    " What fun to revisit a classic such as this and enjoy it as much as ever! And for frosting on the cake, to have the delightful tunes of My Fair Lady replay in one's head for days afterward. Makes me want to pick up The Taming of the Shrew next and duplicate this process. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Natalie Shearer | 9/16/2013

    " A classic! I enjoyed the movie as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vera | 9/10/2013

    " I LOVED IT!!! (no "Eliza, where the devil are my slippers" though...) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah Null | 7/4/2013

    " This was a re-read. I'd forgotten about the epilogue at the end. Very strange for a play to have an epilogue that the audience never sees. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hillary | 12/15/2012

    " One of my favorite stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kendra | 10/12/2012

    " Loved the story, the wit, the quirky characters. One thing that drives me crazy is the inconclusive ending. But, that's the pull. Everyone can decide their own happy ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sana | 9/3/2012

    " oh, the power of language and words! a great story that was made into the audrey hepburn movie "my fair lady" that describes how words and language are the essence of our society. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura Wetsel | 8/28/2012

    " Verrrry didaktik, but endjoiable neverthelass. My advice for Mr.Shaw would have been to write the entire play in Professor Higgins's alphabet. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Angham | 5/27/2012

    " elizadoolittle is agood flower girl "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jenn | 1/24/2012

    " Shaw is brilliant. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 12/10/2011

    " Call me a romantic, but I liked the Lerner and Loewe ending better than the Shaw ending. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charlie Flannelly | 11/17/2011

    " Not as good as I'd hoped, but cute nonetheless. I never did finish the movie of this; must do so at some point. I love Audrey Hepburn. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ken | 11/11/2011

    " AI enjoyed it it. Its a good a the movie My Fair Lady. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Myrna | 9/11/2011

    " It was fun reading this script. I loved the enhancements that were made for "My Fair Lady," but really enjoyed reading the original. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tara Newton | 8/25/2011

    " A mysterious achievement of having stirred no emotions whatsoever. A most profound teaching on the human relations between the mind and the disembodied soul. And also on the English language. Brilliant as the cool mind of a genius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julie | 6/7/2011

    " Incredible story, witty. Laughed out loud! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kayla | 6/6/2011

    " This was an odd little play that I feel indifferent toward. It wasn't exceptionally bad, but neither was it interesting. It seemed to meander toward a point, but never get there, or lose me somewhere along the way. This definitely won't be one of my favorites, but I've read much worse. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shahad | 6/1/2011

    " Another sarcastic book, criticizing the middle class people in the 20th century. Good one, and don't forget "George Bernard Shaw" ;) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela | 5/30/2011

    " I liked this book. It had a certain quirkiness about it that made it a joy to read, but it wasn't amazing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Allegra | 5/26/2011

    " Definitely didn't live up to expectations. It was good though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bells | 5/21/2011

    " Very entertaining! I would love to see this play preformed :) Higgins was so annoying and yet interesting at the same time. And Eliza. Well, she was very similar to Higgins. Not as annoying though. She was great. :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 5/14/2011

    " My experience of this book would have generated a full five star review if it hadn't been colored by so many knock offs. Hollywood and pulp fiction have spun the rags to riches to rags tale so many times. Still, I love the way Shaw rips into hypocrisies and no level of society is safe. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tess | 5/11/2011

    " Hate this forever thanks to Mrs Deignan's English classes "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Olivia | 5/7/2011

    " We read this book out loud in English class and it was really fun! The characters are hilarious. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wendy | 4/28/2011

    " Fairly different from My Fair Lady...I may have enjoyed his ending notes more than the actual play. "

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About the Author
Author George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950), Irish-born playwright, critic, and political activist, began his writing career in London. In addition to writing sixty-three plays, his prodigious output as critic, pamphleteer, and essayist influenced numerous social issues. In 1925, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature and in 1938 an Oscar for the movie version of Pygmalion.