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Download The Game of Silence Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Game of Silence (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Louise Erdrich
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (351 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Louise Erdrich Narrator: Anna Fields Publisher: HarperAudio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2005 ISBN:
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Her name is Omakayas, or Little Frog, because her first step was a hop, and she lives on an island in Lake Superior. It is 1850 and the lives of the Ojibwe have returned to a familiar rhythm: they build their birchbark houses in the summer, go to the ricing camps in the fall to harvest and feast, and move to their cozy cedar log cabins near the town of LaPointe before the first snows.

The satisfying routines of Omakayas's days are interrupted by a surprise visit from a group of desperate and mysterious people. From them, she learns that all their lives may drastically change. The chimookomanag, or white people, want Omakayas and her people to leave their island in Lake Superior and move farther west. Omakayas realizes that something so valuable, so important that she never knew she had it in the first place, is in danger: Her home. Her way of life.

In this captivating sequel to National Book Award nominee The Birchbark House, Louise Erdrich continues the story of Omakayas and her family.

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Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sally | 2/20/2014

    " It does sound somewhat interesting, but I just couldn't get into it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 2/15/2014

    " I really enjoyed this one too. Very well written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dot | 2/13/2014

    " Erdrich writes for both adult and young person readers and this book is one aimed for teenagers. It is based on her own family history as a member of the Ojibwa nation and set in the 19th century. The book tells the stories of the young people living on an island and how they are trained in the age old ways of the tribe. This is a fascinating account and told in a way that informs and entertains "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 sarah | 2/1/2014

    " I love this series! Erdrich says that she really becomes her characters to write from their viewpoint, and it's clear in these books. So richly researched, but the writing feels so comfortable at the same time. Can't wait to read more! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeanne Morigeau | 1/26/2014

    " The continuing story of Omakayas as she becomes a dreamer, receiving special visions of a skilled healer. Her family is anticipating a forced move west into the land of a more vicious people. Again, the reader experiences the changing seasons while waiting on scouts to share news of new governmental policies. Another wonderful read that transports the reader into the daily goings-on of Omakayas and her family. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scot | 1/12/2014

    " Beautifully written story extremely well told. It's heartbreaking yet somehow hopeful. Loved it. Best if read with its prequel, The Birchbark House. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 1/10/2014

    " Native American version of "Little House in the Big Woods." Boy, do I love descriptions of old timey ways of doing things. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Benji Martin | 1/8/2014

    " This book is even better than The Birchback House, which I thought was pretty good. I find myself getting attached to the characters, even the annoying ones. I'm jumping right nto the Porcupine Year! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Travis | 1/8/2014

    " This sequel to The Birchbark House spans another year in the life of Omakayas, two years after the events of the first book. While the first book mainly focused on everyday life and events throughout the year, with little hints of coming changes due to the encroaching white population, The Game of Silence places that struggle front and center, as the Anishinabeg try to figure out why the white men have gone back on their word to let the Anishinabeg stay where they are. There is still plenty of daily life stuff going on, though, as life goes on for Omakayas despite the fear that she and her family might be forced to leave.[return][return]There were several new characters introduced, and more focus on some of the supporting characters (I love Two Strike Girl), but the focus remains on Omakayas. I think this book is actually a little longer than the first, but I found it a much faster read and enjoyed it a little more. Definitely no "middle book syndrome" here. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 12/11/2013

    " Every so often I like to read a children's book, especially one like this that is about a different culture.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tracy Mcfadien | 11/18/2013

    " Interesting middle school children's book "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 S10_Matthew | 11/10/2013

    " Best for middle school students "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carol | 11/2/2013

    " This sequel was even better than The Birchbark House which was outstanding! As the story ends the people of Omakayas' village are forced o leave their ancestral land and must pass through enemy territory on their way west. The Porcupine Year is next in the series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maia | 10/24/2013

    " you learn a lot about a Native American girl growing up when english are invading the U.S.A. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzanne | 9/26/2013

    " Excellent historical fiction, good for young people and old as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pat Knight | 8/26/2013

    " A good connection between the other books in the series. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 9/7/2012

    " Funnier and more engrossing than The Birchbark House; still not as good as The Porcupine Year. It'll be interesting to see what the fourth book is like--whether the author continues to build. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debra | 3/13/2012

    " Re-reading the Omakayas trilogy in preparation for Chickadee. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sue | 12/19/2011

    " This continues the family's story begun in "A Birchbark House" and tells of a year in which their home is threatened by white settlers. It also enlarges the treatment of the extended family. Very interesting story of Native American life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zen Cho | 12/15/2011

    " See review of The Porcupine Year. It has the same appeal as Little House on the Prairie in its description of processes and kids doing work in straightforward language -- I would've really loved those parts as a kid -- while being, obvs, less faily than Little House. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandra | 6/16/2011

    " Really written I believe for young adults this gave much information about how the Indians lived when allowed to have own culture and religion. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 9/2/2010

    " I liked this perhaps even a little better than the Birchbark House. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 S10_Matthew | 7/13/2010

    " Best for middle school students "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 6/7/2010

    " I really enjoyed this one too. Very well written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cheryl S. | 4/9/2009

    " Very enjoyable. Even tho this is the 2nd book in a series and I have not read the first one, this stood alone very well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandra | 3/26/2009

    " Really written I believe for young adults this gave much information about how the Indians lived when allowed to have own culture and religion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melanie | 2/24/2009

    " It's a really good story but it was so long! For me, every once and a while I need the feeling of finishing a book. Not just keep reading and reading. But, as for the story, 5 stars! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maia | 1/26/2009

    " you learn a lot about a Native American girl growing up when english are invading the U.S.A. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzanne | 1/7/2009

    " Excellent historical fiction, good for young people and old as well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 12/3/2008

    " Funnier and more engrossing than The Birchbark House; still not as good as The Porcupine Year. It'll be interesting to see what the fourth book is like--whether the author continues to build. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 11/24/2008

    " I liked this perhaps even a little better than the Birchbark House. "

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About the Author

Louise Erdrich is the author of sixteen novels as well as volumes of poetry, children’s books, short stories, and a memoir of early motherhood. She has received the Library of Congress Prize in American Fiction, the prestigious PEN/Saul Bellow Award for Achievement in American Fiction, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, among many others. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of Birchbark Books, a small independent bookstore.

About the Narrator

Kate Fleming (a.k.a. Anna Fields) (1965–2006), winner of more than a dozen Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award in 2004, was one of the most respected narrators in the industry. Trained at the Actors Theatre of Louisville, she was also a director, producer, and technician at her own studio, Cedar House Audio.