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Download The Diaries of Adam & Eve: Translated by Mark Twain Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Diaries of Adam & Eve: Translated by Mark Twain (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Mandy Patinkin, Betty Buckley, Walter Cronkite Publisher: Fair Oaks Audio, an imprint of Fair Oaks Press Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN:
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Through his imagined journals of Adam and Eve, Mark Twain wrote what has been called one of the great love stories of all time. Mandy Patinkin and Betty Buckley bring Adam and Eve to life, capturing the expected humor as well as the tender eloquence of Twain's most personal, heartfelt writing. In one of his last recordings, Walter Cronkite provides an illuminating commentary on how the author came to reinterpret the Genesis story. This expanded edition, unlike any other version, incorporates previously unpublished passages as well as Mark Twain's mislaid final revision of Adam's Diary.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sirpa Grierson | 2/9/2014

    " Twain's wry look at the beginning of the human race. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jane | 2/7/2014

    " A very comedic look from Adam and Eve's point of view. Definitely some doctrine I don't quite agree with, but it was all in good fun. A quick read on a Sunday afternoon. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Theresa | 2/7/2014

    " I always enjoy this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsay | 2/6/2014

    " Perhaps my favorite piece (or rather pieces) by Clemens. It illustrates wonderfully the misunderstandings and well-intentioned (usually) blunders of the sexes when they come together. Most of all though, I love it because, for me, there comes a point where I stop hearing Adam's voice (figuratively) and instead am hearing Clemens speaking of his wife Livy who had recently died. "Wheresoever she was, THERE was Eden." From Eve's Diary (Adam speaking at her grave) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pat | 2/6/2014

    " Simply WONDERFUL! Great writers have that reputation for a reason - so full of "Twainian" humor! Short and sweet; don't miss this quick "read"! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ray | 2/5/2014

    " Funny and entertaining :) That's Mr. Clemens for ya. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brian | 1/29/2014

    " It was hard for me to get past some of the liberties Mr. Twain took in what is otherwise a wry take on the relationships between man/woman. But I'm a pastor, so what do you expect? My favorite passage dealt with Abel's death-- very poignant. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meri | 1/18/2014

    " Brilliant, biting, hilarious. Mark Twain is the standard with which to measure all irreverant American social commentary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megankellie | 1/13/2014

    " Lovely, funny little book. Read it in a half an hour, and realize "oh okay, McSweeney's is like Mark Twain." Innocents trying to understand stuff. Very funny and nice and bittersweet. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 12/14/2013

    " In true Mark Twain style, he takes you back to the beginning with Adam and Eve. Adam's telling of events are very different from Eve's as you would expect. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee Margaret | 12/5/2013

    " This is a funny and fun to read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Noel | 11/20/2013

    " Brilliant. Mark Twain does not disappoint. The concept is clever and executed well. Really funny. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dylan | 11/11/2013

    " "When I found out it could talk, I felt a new interest in it, for I love to talk. I talk all day and in my sleep too, and I am very interesting. But if I had another to talk to, I could be twice as interesting and would never stop, if desired." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan Hall | 10/26/2013

    " It's Mark Twain, need I say more! This is an absolutely HILARIOUS perspective about men and women and how it all began! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bridgette Collado | 10/25/2013

    " This is one of the sweetest and most humorous books I have read! A very quick read as well... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cerareine Hall | 10/23/2013

    " This was probably a banned book back in the day, now days we have so few subjects off topic that this book is almost boring. Short and still worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea Madriz | 9/25/2013

    " Excellent book!! Everybody should read it!! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saya Hashimoto | 9/21/2013

    " Kind of unexpected plot turns. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany | 9/17/2013

    " If you love Mark Twain's wit and humour, you will definitely love this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison | 9/4/2013

    " A quick, easy read with a lot of great laughs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mollie | 8/17/2013

    " The Diaries of Adam and Eve by Mark Twain (2002) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Etta | 6/29/2013

    " this was a very light read and very funny "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ellen Yeomans | 5/24/2013

    " I reread this one at least once a year--usually around Valentine's Day. There are different versions. I like the "Buffalo Chamber of Commerce" one the best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nalora | 4/15/2013

    " Anyone who has not read The Diary of Adam and Eve by Mark Twain is missing out on some of the best of what Mark Twain is. This is satire at its best. This is a book I always recommend to people, even those who are not "into" Mark Twain, or classic American Literature. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tristy | 3/8/2013

    " As the introduction states, Mark Twain wrote this at the height of his "gloominess, pessimism, and contempt for organized religion" and it shows. It still has his wit and humor, but it is darker and more sad than his earlier, more jovial works. It was a bit of a slog to get through. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessi | 5/31/2012

    " pretty funny until their respective endings. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.