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Download The Deportees and Other Stories Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Deportees and Other Stories (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Roddy Doyle
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (846 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Roddy Doyle Narrator: Hugh Lee Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2008 ISBN:
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The eight tales in Roddy Doyle's first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. New Boy describes the first day of school for a nine-year-old boy from Africa, while in The Pram, a terrifying ghost story, a Polish nanny grows impatient with her charge's older sisters and decides - in a new phrase she has learned - to scare them shitless.

In 57% Irish, a man decides to devise a test of Irishness by measuring reactions to three things: Riverdance, the song Danny Boy, and Robbie Keane's goal against Germany in the 2002 World Cup. And in the wonderful title story, Jimmy Rabbitte, the man who formed The Commitments decides that it's time to find a new band - a multicultural outfit that specializes not in soul music but in the folk songs of Woody Guthrie.

With empathy and insight, The Deportees and Other Stories takes a new slant on the immigrant experience, something of increasing relevance in today's Ireland. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Renee | 2/19/2014

    " I couldn't even finish these short stories. Sadly I think Roddy Doyle is no longer interesting... although it is interesting what has happened to Ireland "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cora | 2/15/2014

    " In The Deportees and Other Stories, Roddy Doyle presents eight stories about the immigrant experience in contemporary Ireland. The stories were from a wide range of perspectives including a father confronting prejudice within himself, a high school boy confronting racism from authority, and a man asked to develop a test of how Irish perspective citizens are. The title story is a story about Jimmy Rabbitte, from Doyle's The Committments, once again putting together a band. I enjoyed reading these stories. Doyle tackled some serious issues, but always included humor. The characters were multidimensional and genuine. I would definitely like to read more from Doyle in the future. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 2/14/2014

    " Feckin' brilliant book of short stories from one of the best living authors. Thank you once again, Roddy Doyle, for your honest, perceptive, funny and hopeful writing. If you read The Committments, be sure to at least check out the story called The Deportees to see what happened to Jimmy Rabbitte! :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kinga | 2/5/2014

    " A collection of short stories, originally written in 800 word chunks for Metro Eireann, a magazine. Each story focuses on an immigrant in Ireland, their experiences, encounters with the locals and the reaction of the locals to them. Each story is different and equally fantastic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 AnnMarie | 1/30/2014

    " Roddy Doyle's voice is one of the most unique in fiction, and this collection of short stories didn't disappoint. All the charm of his best novels of the 1990s packed into pocket-sized narratives that set familiar themes (and a few familiar characters) against a newly evolved backdrop. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dennis Willingham | 1/23/2014

    " I love Doyle, and it kills me to only give it 3 stars, but this is not his strongest effort. I was fascinated by the subject and his take on it, but the collection of columns format is not my favorite. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stuart Barnett | 1/21/2014

    " Roddy Doyle can usually give me the giggles. Not here. Ah, well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 1/20/2014

    " Very slight stories, brief character studies of Dublin changing with an influx of money and immigrants. No deep insights here, but still entertaining and readable in an evening or two. I should add that a couple of stories, one about a black Dubliner searching for his roots in New York, the other about a Polish nanny and her witchy boss, are a step above the rest. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 1/20/2014

    " Looooove Roddy Doyle! And I'm so excited to meet Jimmy Rabbitte again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 zan | 1/16/2014

    " Really enjoyable. Not as brilliant as his novels (thus only three stars), but it's good to see someone writing about the new immigration situation in Ireland, and really ponder what it means to be Irish. Roddy Doyle made it funny and touching and real all at once. "Grand." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Derek Bridge | 12/29/2013

    " The concept here is good: Roddy Doyle tunes into the attitudes of, and the attitudes to, the diaspora of other countries, now resident in Ireland. However, a couple of laugh-out-loud lines aside, I was left somewhat underwhelmed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew | 11/19/2013

    " Remarkably uneven! The title story is awesome. The one about the test the government comes up with to mark Irishness is dreadful. Most are somewhere in-between. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 11/14/2013

    " A hilarious and insightful collection of short stories. Roddy Doyle at his best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 11/4/2013

    " I don't usually like to read collections of short stories so much but I love Roddy Doyle and I love Ireland and his look at the new Ireland and its immigrants is, at least in parts, as good as he's ever written -- especially the title story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary | 8/16/2013

    " Roddy Doyle writes stories that feel real. The people talk like people, not rounded characters. They're rough and messy and don't know themselves, and we feel the same. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nomi | 7/2/2013

    " A great collection of short stories that truly convey life in the new globalized Ireland. Doyle realistically portrays the tensions between traditional native(white) Irish and the influx of Nigerian and Eastern European immigrants "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shannon | 6/29/2013

    " Great book of short stories if you are intested in how the Celtic Tiger Economy has influenced Ireland. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paddy | 5/2/2013

    " Not usually a short story fan, but I really enjoyed these stories, which place the reader in Doyle's Dublin, a place he's brought alive for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 11/19/2012

    " A bit uneven but good--worth it for The New Boy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aurelia D'andrea | 8/24/2012

    " Another colorful-against-a-grey-backdrop series of stories that made me laugh, shiver under the covers with fear, and feel grateful, yet again, that I didn't move to Ireland. (Though I've enjoyed my visits there!!!) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Charlane Brady | 6/13/2012

    " Roddy Doyle is an exceptional writer...this book of short stories is an easy, spunky read but just did not humor me as I was hoping. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nette | 5/23/2012

    " Four stars instead of five only because I don't care for short stories. Roddy Doyle is a feckin god, though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annjanette | 11/22/2011

    " Brilliant storyteller! Loved all the stories! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alana | 11/16/2011

    " Hilarious vignettes about the super-accelerated melting pot that is Ireland. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 11/7/2011

    " A chance to revisit Jimmy Rabbitt (the goofy promoter from "The Commitments") and enjoy a truly masterful short story writer. Grand. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Richard Mulholland | 8/9/2011

    " Good fun Irish short stories "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim | 5/12/2011

    " Roddy Doyle is one of my favorite authors. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 1/3/2011

    " I'm not usually a fan of short story anthologies -- there is usually too much muck to wade through. But Roddy Doyle has written an engrossing and passionate work that never disappoints. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 11/5/2010

    " Classic Doyle - humour with a powerful message "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dejan | 8/11/2010

    " A hilarious and insightful collection of short stories. Roddy Doyle at his best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hal | 6/7/2010

    " Stories about immigrants in Ireland. His dialogue and regular characters always seem very authentic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adriana | 5/13/2010

    " Insightful & witty stories that portray the changing population of modern day Ireland ... always funny & entertaining - love Roddy Doyle! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 5/13/2010

    " A chance to revisit Jimmy Rabbitt (the goofy promoter from "The Commitments") and enjoy a truly masterful short story writer. Grand. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie | 4/9/2010

    " I love Roddy Doyle! The book was grand! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maha | 2/8/2010

    " depressing.. realistic and depressing (with, perhaps, the exception of The Pram). But good. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ray1759 | 1/9/2010

    " I think I expected a little more from this book, based on Roddy Doyle's previous books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 11/14/2009

    " Some great stories here, but given the constrained format, some were better than others. Still, Doyle is one of the few contemporary writers I really admire. He has a way of getting inside his characters' skin that is uncanny--and wholly convincing. "

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About the Author
Author Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle is an Irish novelist, dramatist, and screenwriter. He is a recipient of the Irish PEN Award for Literature, and his novel Paddy Clarke Ha-Ha won the Man Booker Prize in 1993. Several of his books have been made into successful films, beginning with The Commitments in 1991. 

About the Narrator

Hugh Lee has worked extensively in theater and television. He starred in the West End in Stones in His Pockets, played Yolland in the Abbey Theatre’s production of Translations, and played Thurio in The Two Gentlemen of Verona. His television appearances include Bad Girls, Just William, Doctors, and Bugs.