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Download The Creators: A History of Heroes of the Imagination Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Creators: A History of Heroes of the Imagination Audiobook, by Daniel J. Boorstin
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,114 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Daniel J. Boorstin Narrator: Michael Jackson Publisher: The Publishing Mills Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2002 ISBN:
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In this companion volume to The Discoverers, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Daniel J. Boorstin brings to life more than three thousand years of human artistic achievement.

In this engrossing book, Boorstin examines what people have added to the world: painting, sculpture, architecture, theology, philosophy, history, poetry, drama, literature, dance, music, and film.

In a narrative brimming with lively biographical sketches and illuminating anecdotes, Boorstin captures the remarkable history of artistic achievement in the West.

Here is a truly epic story, told with all the excitement, appreciation, and authority Boorstin brought to The Discoverers. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aaron | 2/14/2014

    " Fairly superficial entries on tons of artists. Fairly forgettable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adam | 2/4/2014

    " I love little factsy books like this. And I love things about creation. I read the entire thing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suby | 1/28/2014

    " The author traces the history of human creativity starting with India , China and Japan and then proceeds to architecture of Egypt, Rome, France and Italy through to 20th century American skyscrapers. In a similar fashion he treats the topics of music, literature, theatre, sculpture and painting. He goes on to photography and movies and gives a comprehensive account of how the process got democratised and all pervasive. A very fascinating history indeed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Brimmer | 1/25/2014

    " Boorstin writes such painless history, his logic is clear and connections self evident. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 1/21/2014

    " It wasn't long enough - seriously. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin | 12/30/2013

    " Having re-read this book after a lapse of many years, I still find it to be an excellent guide to the great creative minds of history, especially Western history. The earlier chapters and history were of much more interest to me; my interest waned considerably as I got near the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim Pieraccini | 12/22/2013

    " Fascinating, but inevitably slightly superficial considering the ground covered, and in one or two places could have done with tighter editing (some repetition, for example). But a splendid overview of creative thought and aspiration and the development of the arts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kiof | 12/8/2013

    " Great book, but don't necessarily read every page. Unless you're really serious. Anyways, I liked it. I'm very impressed by the authors achievement. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 R. David | 12/2/2013

    " Not as fun of a read as Boorstin's Discoverers book but well worth reading and owning. Boorstin writes history in a way that life is breathed into the work and it becomes more than just an exercise in memorizing dates and names. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric | 11/22/2013

    " A great tour through history of creative individuals. Seeing the unfolding of creativity of many forms through many centuries appealed to my love of the history of ideas. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amber Vance | 9/18/2013

    " If you love history as much as I do then you'll love this book! I learned so many interesting things that I didn't know. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Roxanne Russell | 8/4/2013

    " This book is dense, but I loved it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt | 6/26/2013

    " This guy used to have the best job in the world: Librarian of Congress. How do I get hooked up with that one? I enjoyed all of the books in this series (Discoverers, Seekers). Lovers of comp-lit, you should read these. If I were teaching a humanities course, I would use these books as texts. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tony | 5/2/2013

    " This second part of the historical trilogy by Daniel Boorstin is outstanding in tracing the lives and works of the great artists and creative geniuses throughout history. Although it is very dense and detailed and will require a slow and careful reading, it provides a wealth of information. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Melbie | 12/24/2012

    " When this book came out, I knew I had to read it. After reading The Discoverers back in the 80s, I knew that I would not be disappointed. I was not! And, I just now noticed another book in the series that I never knew about, The Seekers. I must read it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susie | 12/11/2012

    " It took me a long while to get through it - very informative but also very dense - but it's well written and entertaining... It's like a really great survey course on humanities taught by an interesting professor. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth Tedford | 6/21/2012

    " I loved this book and its' companion title The Discovers.(Refer to that entry to see full review). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia Karl | 5/10/2012

    " A mighty tome to be read and savored. It is packed full of information and beautifully written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Oasix21 | 4/23/2012

    " I love these types of books, because they are lengthy you know that you will have hours of entertainment, a good read which I recommend to all of those that are interested in religious history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andy Molino | 2/15/2012

    " This book was the great humanities class I never took. I devoured classic literature for two years after I finished this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Grindy Stone | 2/2/2012

    " Dense and overly comprehensive. There are some splendid nuggets in here but you have to wade through lots of words to get to them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Slarson6 | 9/21/2011

    " Like the Discoverers, this is a sweeping telling of the creations of humanity. The art, music, language, and religions that have been "created" in history. Another HUGE book, yet hard to put down once you start. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 9/18/2011

    " Not as good as the first; artists are weird. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug Stalgren | 8/29/2011

    " One of the best non-fiction books I've ever read. I have given this as a gift to many people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karen | 7/21/2011

    " One can only conclude from reading this book that Daniel Boorstin was a genius. The book contains an amazing survey of world history. It's a behemoth of a book and I can no longer believe I read the whole thing, which means I need to reread it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Franz | 7/1/2011

    " This book changed the way I look at the world. It helped me realize that the world I inhabit, this culture, the way we define ourselves is a gift. The genious and hard work of many generations of brilliant men given freely to you and me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven Salaita | 6/30/2011

    " I read this, along with Boorstin's The Discoverers, back in high school. I learned a lot from it, but as I've grown I look back at both volumes as incurably Eurocentric. The Discoverers in particular lionizes colonization. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 George King | 5/16/2011

    " Given to me on my 50th birthday. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 George | 3/20/2011

    " Given to me on my 50th birthday. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Franz | 2/12/2011

    " This book changed the way I look at the world. It helped me realize that the world I inhabit, this culture, the way we define ourselves is a gift. The genious and hard work of many generations of brilliant men given freely to you and me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 12/13/2010

    " When this book came out, I knew I had to read it. After reading The Discoverers back in the 80s, I knew that I would not be disappointed. I was not! And, I just now noticed another book in the series that I never knew about, The Seekers. I must read it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Douglas | 7/7/2010

    " If you read this book keep a good dictionary by your side. This guys vocabulary is amazing. From philosophy, to architecture, to painting and writings, those who are creative are examined exhaustively. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric | 6/22/2010

    " A great tour through history of creative individuals. Seeing the unfolding of creativity of many forms through many centuries appealed to my love of the history of ideas. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug | 12/20/2009

    " One of the best non-fiction books I've ever read. I have given this as a gift to many people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 R. | 11/25/2009

    " Not as fun of a read as Boorstin's Discoverers book but well worth reading and owning. Boorstin writes history in a way that life is breathed into the work and it becomes more than just an exercise in memorizing dates and names. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 10/6/2009

    " I read this, along with Boorstin's The Discoverers, back in high school. I learned a lot from it, but as I've grown I look back at both volumes as incurably Eurocentric. The Discoverers in particular lionizes colonization. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gaius Tullius | 8/13/2009

    " Having re-read this book after a lapse of many years, I still find it to be an excellent guide to the great creative minds of history, especially Western history. The earlier chapters and history were of much more interest to me; my interest waned considerably as I got near the end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 6/8/2009

    " Boorstin writes such painless history, his logic is clear and connections self evident. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 3/9/2009

    " I love this book!! It is the ciriculum for my honors colloquim and rarely have I enjoyed perscribed reading so much!

    I learned a little bit about everything in this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt | 12/23/2008

    " This guy used to have the best job in the world: Librarian of Congress. How do I get hooked up with that one? I enjoyed all of the books in this series (Discoverers, Seekers). Lovers of comp-lit, you should read these. If I were teaching a humanities course, I would use these books as texts. "

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About the Author
Author Daniel J. Boorstin

Daniel J. Boorstin was born in 1914 and educated at Harvard, Yale, and Oxford. He is Librarian of Congress Emeritus, having directed the US national library from 1979-1987. He had previously been Director of the National Museum for History and Technology and of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. He taught at the University of Chicago for twenty-five years.