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Download The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance Audiobook, by Laurie Garrett Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (3,807 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Laurie Garrett Narrator: Kimberly Schraf Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2009 ISBN: 9780307706775
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In The Coming Plague, Laurie Garrett looks deeply into human impact on the environment, and how this could lead to a new danger in the form of deadly viruses. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine G | 2/10/2014

    " The text book of infectious diseases. Responsible for a lifelong interest in epidemiology. Thank you Beloit College Professor Fass!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jafr | 2/5/2014

    " Great book on diseases. Each chapter is organized around a specific desease or historic outbreak, so linear reading isnt required. It's a great book on bacti and the viruses and especially the vectors that introduce them to human populations. Its definitely an eye-opener. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa Miller | 2/2/2014

    " Because for those who know me well ... They know my fantasy job is to be an epidemiologist for the CDC! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dot | 1/27/2014

    " A great book for followers of pre-socialist public health adventures in disease hunting and lovers of microbiology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erlandsen_nd | 1/26/2014

    " a huge book that can seem overwhelming, and well it is a bit dry, it is super informative and interesting "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 K | 1/23/2014

    " It all depends what you are looking for. This book is mostly fiction, part detective novel, and part really scary (because it's true). It has lots of facts about CDC and WHO investigations and gets bogged down with some of that too. If you get grossed out by blood or illness, than this book is not for you. Overall it is a really interesting book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Neely | 1/21/2014

    " One of the best books I've ever read (multiple times). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Graham | 1/20/2014

    " I typed a long review of this and then it didn't save. I don't feel like writing another but in a nutshell this is a fascinating look at the spread of infectious diseases and the poor policy decisions that have abetted their spread. Because the book is a decade and a half old I felt like I was missing out on any newer part of the story, but that's no fault of the author's. Good stuff, wish my longer review saved. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Derek Emerson | 1/18/2014

    " Not a light book, but very easy to read. Garrett does a great job of making the complicated simple. She also writes about medicine and doctors like it is a action-thriller, and at times it is. A great book for those who like the history of science. Also a great book for those wanting to know more about the diseases which impact us and the ways in which we can (and sometimes choose not to) be involved. Not a scare-book -- a thinking book. I recently heard Garrett speak and had the chance to spend some time with. She is a good speaker and a person worth listening too. She has more information in her head than most! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Justin | 1/17/2014

    " Certainly some controversial stuff, but she does a great job of describing the nature of so many diseases, usually with an emphasis on how they change over time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kim | 1/14/2014

    " I'm a sucker for epidemiology :) Well written and researched although I think I preferred Hot Zone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy | 1/8/2014

    " Read this several years ago but need to read it again! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caitlin | 1/5/2014

    " There are a lot of small stories. Some are interesting, some are confusing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wendy | 12/19/2013

    " An excellent companion to Richard Preston's "The Hot Zone" - scary! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Brimmer | 11/13/2013

    " Scary, scary, scary............. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Happyreader | 9/28/2012

    " This is one of the most terrifying books I ever read. While it's now 13 years out of date, there's enough medical and viral mayhem to horrify anyone who was fascinated by the Hot Zone or The Great Influenza. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tasha | 9/16/2012

    " While this book was interesting to read, it was written as a contemporary analysis of the state of preparedness of the US and the world in the face of emerging diseases. However, it was written in 1994-5 therefore it is out-of-date today and may or may not still be a valid analysis. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marta Wayne | 9/14/2012

    " Loved it-- learned a ton-- slightly sensationalized. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leah | 8/31/2012

    " Many great chapters, but the one on the origins of AIDS is a great summary of that disease's history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Valerie | 6/20/2012

    " Written by a UCSC graduate, this book covers all of the many ways are actions contribute to the spread of disease vectors. Fascinating, scary and informative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Booknerd Fraser | 4/22/2012

    " An incredible piece of reportage that goes very quickly despite its length. Terrifying in places (mostly for future implications), it's actually a history of combating infectious disease in the second half of the 20th century, along with chronicling the breakdown of the public health system. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charlene | 2/5/2012

    " Not an easy read but very interesting. I read this when it first came out so I don't know if it has been updated. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dana | 9/21/2011

    " Kind of scary because its all true. Love it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley Hammons | 9/4/2011

    " Everyone in the medical field should read this! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 6/1/2011

    " Great book for all of the science nerds out there! Don't read this if you are easily freaked out. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 12/29/2010

    " nothing better than a newly emerging disease! each chapter covers a different threat - from ebola to hiv to toxic shock syndrome. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 12/23/2010

    " It's so scary because it's all true! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 9/15/2010

    " Another book about human suffering and diseases. A little too scientific for me, but still pretty interesting stuff. It's a bit dated and makes a lot of predictions about the number of people world-wide infected with different viruses. I do wonder if these predictions were met. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 ara133photography | 8/21/2010

    " This was a good book but it terrified me so much that I couldn't sleep for weeks. Don't read this if you even have a hint of having hypochondriac tendencies!!! i read it for a bio class in college... otherwise I wouldn't have gone near it! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 6/18/2010

    " It's scary. For reals. But then it's so much of the same thing you kinda get desensitized to it. MRSA, no big woop. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 3/19/2010

    " Informative book about emerging diseases and what the CDC and WHO and other organizations are doing to prevent the spread and treat people.
    Medically, very interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Neely | 2/17/2010

    " One of the best books I've ever read (multiple times). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sara | 1/10/2010

    " Loved this book. Makes you really think about the global world we live in and how mankind can never really cnquer nature. Amazing people are doing amazing things to protect us all from viruses and plagues that are still yet to be identified. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Natalie | 11/28/2009

    " I only read a few chapters in this book, but I do recommend it for anyone interested in immunology or pathology. The Coming Plague definitely provides useful information about emerging diseases "

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About the Author

Laurie Garrett is the only writer ever to have been awarded all three of the Big “Ps” of journalism: the Peabody, the Polk, and the Pulitzer. Her journalistic efforts at KPFA-FM radio in northern California garnered the 1977 George Foster Peabody broadcast journalism award, for a series called “Science Story.” In 1996 Garrett received the Pulitzer Prize for her coverage of the 1995 Ebola virus epidemic in Kikwit, Zaire. The following year she was awarded the George C. Polk award for a series of more than thirty articles she published in Newsday, documenting the collapse of health and rise of HIV, tuberculosis, diphtheria, and dozens of other diseases in the former Soviet countries. Her second Polk Award was given in recognition of the reporting in Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health.

About the Narrator

Kimberly Schraf is an audiobook narrator whose readings include Margaret Peterson Haddix’s Running Out of Time, Laurie Garrett’s The Coming Plague, and Karen Joy Fowler’s The Jane Austen Book Club, among many others.