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Download The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (22,036 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Nassim Nicholas Taleb Narrator: David Chandler Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2007 ISBN:
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Maverick thinker Nassim Nicholas Taleb had an illustrious career on Wall Street before turning his focus to his black swan theory. Not all swans are white, and not all events, no matter what the experts think, are predictable. Taleb shows that black swans, like 9/11, cannot be foreseen and have an immeasurable impact on the world. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ikhwan alim | 1/16/2014

    " Many things happen without formula. We cannot arrange the formula to achive it. We only culd propose the systematic thinking about it after the things happen. Such as 11 september at 2001. Black Swan are about those things. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie Moynihan | 1/14/2014

    " Only read this book if you love math and statistics. Otherwise I think it would be a boring read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marjolein | 1/14/2014

    " I liked the ideas that were presented. Taleb makes you think and shows you the thought habits you have fallen into. However, to me the book felt as an accusation of scientist/academics, who allegedly think too highly of themselves, ignore common sense and do research that is not useful in practice. In my perspective, that is a very exagorated, limited and unnuanced view of academia . Taleb might want to update as well, e.g. He might want to discuss evolutionary economics, which solves a lot of his critique on neoclassical economics. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Domenico | 1/7/2014

    " Not so clear. The author has his own ideas about randomness, information etc. but he isn't a good teacher, he's not able to demonstrate his thesys, only to show them. If you are not convinced he won't convince you. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vern Glaser | 12/31/2013

    " This is a must read book. Don't agree with everything but it is quite a nice take on a lot of important topics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ziyad Khesbak | 11/27/2013

    " The Black Swan changed the way I think. If there is one sure-fire way to improve your thinking, it is to identify and disassemble your own cognitive biases. Taleb arms the reader with the tools to do so. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Z | 8/24/2013

    " This book challenges the way we think, and is quite entertaining as well. Randomness and probability are fascinating subjects to me, and this book has an eye-opening approach to these subjects. There is something in here that relates to every aspect of life...HIGHLY recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ke Huang | 6/11/2013

    " Although this book could do with some editing, it was quite informative about randomness and probability. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bruno Hannart | 5/20/2013

    " Un livre qui donne l'impression de devenir un peu plus intelligent "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jared Decker | 4/8/2013

    " I liked that Taleb questioned assumptions. I disliked his broad generalizations. I had a hard time finishing this book, but forced myself to because it challenged my view of statistics and the world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Max | 2/23/2013

    " I'd say, author uses a lot of qualitative approaches to mathematical terms. However I share his main approach: everything could happened and nobody could predict that! The only way to survive and be succesfull is to get use out of stochastic events, which he called Black Swans. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dan Robertson | 12/10/2012

    " I got the point early on in this book and finally put it down. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James D Smith | 11/11/2012

    " Fooled by Randomness was better. It's been well over a year since I read this one though and I do recall being immensely impressed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bryan Fordham | 5/23/2012

    " Premise is very good. Unfortunately with the sweeping, unsupported statements insulting just about everyone, and an author who doesn't come across as very likeable, I can't recommend reading the whole thing. Read the intro, skim the middle, read the conclusion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victor | 4/10/2012

    " it makes you rethink your certainties about knoledge "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dermot Harnett | 2/5/2012

    " This is the most important piece of nonfiction I know of being published this decade. It's thesis offers new insights into eveything from economics to literature to molecular biology. All thinking people should read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Diana Caraghiaur | 11/27/2011

    " After reading the book I feel like an animal better adapted to the modern complex society: being lazy most of the time and working hard for very short periods. What remains is just to know how to create valuable systems functioning like that. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shin Hum | 10/5/2011

    " So... how do we catch the improbable? Be the improbable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ryan | 5/23/2011

    " I feel that many non-fiction "idea" books could be better summarized in a lengthy essay; The Black Swan is no exception. While the idea is fantastic and important, Taleb's writing would benefit greatly from the editors he so deplores. Read for the ideas, not the writing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 5/12/2011

    " What we don't know can hurt us. and we dont know jack shit and jacl left town before 2012 "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe | 5/11/2011

    " Interesting, but hard to get into. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 5/8/2011

    " Awesome book. My whole life I wondered how people knew all this stuff - turns out they don't. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Murray | 5/6/2011

    " I like Taleb's contrarian attitude, and his ideas are compelling, but I felt he spent too much time attacking or vaunting other minds. I enjoyed his Fooled By Randomness more than this selection. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thomas | 5/6/2011

    " Eye-opening--challenges perceptions of risk vs. volatility.

    Interesting remarks on Fannie Mae [written 4-7 years prior to the housing bust] and the overwhelming faith pension fund management.

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aditya | 4/20/2011

    " The events are seen in a different perspective altogether. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ricardo | 4/19/2011

    " Gave up, was not going any where
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel | 4/18/2011

    " This book provides you an alternative understanding of the world, other than standard economic statistics. By now everyone knows that those do not work in the real world, just look at LTCM. Anyone with an interest in their investments should read this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack | 4/16/2011

    " Excellent book. 4 out if 5 stars. Nassim always told me that "five star reviews are bullshit. The real review has some criticism. The 4-star reviews are more influential anyway." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan | 4/13/2011

    " The writer is abrasive at times, like any trader from the 80s, but lots of great info and stories and by the finish he had finally convinced me of his primary point- that the Gaussian curve does not apply where human behavior is involved. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tony | 4/12/2011

    " Verbose. Great concept, but I'm not sure it needs a whole book. My opinion is that his point could be made with a New Yorker article. The rest of his book is just him ranting on various topics. Some of the topics are interesting, some are not. "

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About the Author
Author Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Nassim Nicholas Taleb is the New York Times bestselling author of The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Fooled By Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets, Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder, and others. In addition to his books, Taleb has written many academic essays and articles for scholarly journals. He received a PhD, MS, and BS from the University of Paris and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University’s Polytechnic Institute and has given lectures at Oxford University, Stanford University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, among others. Taleb divides his time between New York, Lebanon, Paris, and London.

About the Narrator

David Chandler is an audiobook narrator who has read numerous titles for William Kent Krueger and C. J. Box, among others.