Extended Audio Sample

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Unabridged), by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 4 (697,288 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: William Dufris Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Audio Length: Release Date:
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SPECIAL OFFER: Get the full text of this classic novel as an eBook when you purchase the audio. You'll receive an e-mail with a link to download the eBook after your purchase is confirmed. Having the novel in convenient Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format will allow you to read along with the audio, perform a cover to cover search for your favorite passages, and more.

Huckleberry Finn, rebel against school and church, casual inheritor of gold treasure, rafter of the Mississippi, and savior of Jim the runaway slave, is the archetypal American maverick.

Fleeing the respectable society that wants to sivilize him, Huck Finn shoves off with Jim on a rhapsodic raft journey down the Mississippi River. The two bind themselves to one another, becoming intimate friends and agreeing there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.

As Huck learns about love, responsibility, and morality, the trip becomes a metaphoric voyage through his own soul, culminating in the glorious moment when he decides to go to hell rather than return Jim to slavery.

Mark Twain defined classic as a book which people praise and don't read; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a happy exception to his own rule. Twain's mastery of dialect, coupled with his famous wit, has made Huckleberry Finn one of the most loved and distinctly American classics ever written. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Reviews

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Review by Alan | 2/7/2014

    " Twain, sharp as hell, lets the slavery apologists have it. Terrifying to modern readers with its true to the time use of racist epithets, and uncomfortable beyond that with an educated white man's sympathy-from-high-ground, it remains a fun and witty read, and possibly still a good introduction to oppression and equality for young people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Review by Justin Klinger | 2/6/2014

    " I don't care what anyone says. I still prefer Tom Sawyer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Review by Michell Burns | 1/13/2014

    " Twain was such a great storyteller. He spins quite a yarn. Beside all the symbolism of the raft and the river, it is just a great ride. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Review by Zabel | 12/27/2013

    " I read this book years ago and LOVED it. Full of adventure, I got a kick out of Huckleberry Finn. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

About the Narrator

William Dufris attended the University of Southern Maine in Portland-Gorham before pursuing a career in voice work in London and then the United States. He has won more than twenty AudioFile Earphones Awards, was voted one of the Best Voices at the End of the Century by AudioFile magazine, and won the prestigious Audie Award in 2012 for best nonfiction narration. He lives with his family in Maine.