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Download Thalia Book Club: David Rakoff's Half Empty and Sloane Crosley's How Did You Get This Number Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Thalia Book Club: David Rakoffs Half Empty and Sloane Crosleys How Did You Get This Number Audiobook, by David Rakoff
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Rakoff Narrator: Ira Glass Publisher: Symphony Space Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2011 ISBN:
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The whip-smart and funny authors of the essay collections Don't Get Too Comfortable (Rakoff) and I Was Told There'd Be Cake (Crosley) join up to examine our contemporary culture and the many ways life can go awry in New York City, as presented in their new books. Ira Glass (This American Life) will introduce the authors.

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About the Author
Author David Rakoff

David Rakoff (1964–2012) was a Canadian-born writer based in New York City who was noted for his humorous, sometimes autobiographical nonfiction essays. He was an essayist, journalist, and actor and a regular contributor to the radio program This American Life.

About the Narrator

Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. HE started working in public radio in 1978, when he was 19, as an intern at NPR’s headquarters in Washington, DC. Over the next seventeen years, he worked on nearly every NPR news show and did nearly every production job they had: tape-cutter, desk assistant, newscast writer, editor, producer, reporter, and substitute host. He spent a year in a high school for NPR, and a year in an elementary school, filing stories for All Things Considered. He moved to Chicago in 1989 and put This American Life on the air in 1995. In 2013 Ira Glass received the Medal for Spoken Language from the American Academy of Arts & Letters.