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Download Survival of the Sickest: A Medical Maverick Discovers Why We Need Disease Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Survival of the Sickest: A Medical Maverick Discovers Why We Need Disease (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Sharon Moalem
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,356 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sharon Moalem Narrator: Eric Conger Publisher: HarperAudio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2007 ISBN:
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How did a deadly genetic disease help our ancestors survive the bubonic plagues of Europe? Was diabetes evolution's response to the last Ice Age? Will a visit to the tanning salon help bring down your cholesterol? Why do we age? Why are some people immune to HIV? Can your genes be turned on or off?

Survival of the Sickest reveals the answers to these and many other questions as it unravels the amazing connections between evolution, disease, and human health today.

Joining the ranks of modern myth busters, Dr. Sharon Moalem turns our current understanding of illness on its head and challenges us to fundamentally change the way we think about our bodies, our health, and our relationship to just about every other living thing on earth, from plants and animals to insects and bacteria.

Survival of the Sickest is filled with fascinating insights and cutting-edge research, presented in a way that is both accessible and utterly absorbing. This is a book about the interconnectedness of all life on earth and, especially, what that means for us. Listen to it. You're already living it.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scarlett | 2/5/2014

    " Fun with genetics! Written in a fun style that makes it very approachable to the laymen. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ann | 2/4/2014

    " This was just OK. A quick look at new scientific advances in the field of genetics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzie Quint | 2/4/2014

    " I enjoyed this tremendously. A provocative book that is on the cutting edge of gene research. Written for the layman. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angel | 2/1/2014

    " Very interesting look into evolution and how it is viewed by scientists and the general population, and how that leads to misconceptions and refusal of new ideas and theories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristina | 1/29/2014

    " One of the coolest books I have ever read. Science is awesome! I learned a lot from this book, even though the chapters about mitochondrial DNA were a little difficult to comprehend. I would like to read this again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniela | 1/23/2014

    " hmm, interesting and actually a quick read "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cindy Raquepau | 1/22/2014

    " Chapter 7: Methyl Madness, methylation changes DNA in fetus. Methylation is caused by the enviroment, smoking is one of the substances that can cause methylation. Smoking by the maternal grandmother during pregnancy increases asthma risks in her grandchildren, beacause methylation occurs in the formation of her future daughter's eggs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 1/20/2014

    " This book is written for novices; the plus being that it is easily understandable, the minus being that is sometimes seems too simple. Having said that there was hardly a chapter that went by that I wasn't amazed at least a couple of times by the ideas presented. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steph | 1/18/2014

    " I read this book as a biology assignment and did not expect to enjoy it. It was actually somewhat enjoyable and interesting. It takes some effort to get started, but afterwards continues at a good pace. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patricia | 1/13/2014

    " Although this book is very interesting and brings light to some new topics for thought, I feel that the author doesn't quite convince me with compelling evidence. Also there is a very clear "nerdiness" in the quality of his writing. It could be the over usage of puns. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 El211 | 12/25/2013

    " written for idiots, but pleasant and breezy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan Gallagher | 12/12/2013

    " Liked it. I read tons of this kind of stuff and yet I learned a lot from this book - e.g. women infected with toxoplasmosis are more likely to spend money on clothes and make-up; organic celery is good for people with psoriasis. Great stuff! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barb | 12/8/2013

    " Interesting read. The tone of the narrative gets a bit annoying after a while. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathleen | 11/29/2013

    " Very interesting insights into why certain diseases and medical conditions exist in the world today. I enjoyed learning more about how the body and the immune system work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard Roberts | 11/12/2013

    " Very interesting book about the process of evolution and disease and how they affect us and each other. It's a fast read with lighthearted humor and it's thought provoking. I recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zigra | 11/6/2013

    " I expected this to be a little more "hardcore science", but it was still a pretty good and fairly well-documented book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Larry | 10/29/2013

    " 4.5 Need to catch up on your Evolution and DNA research read this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tfalcone | 6/11/2013

    " Very enjoyable excursion about the origins and advantages and disadvantages of certain conditions. Much discussion about evolution and coevolution and epigenetics - right up my alley! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenna | 1/3/2013

    " I love evolutionary biology. This was a great book, really made me think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 12/14/2012

    " So.. if you're interested in a different medical/evolutional perspective this is a great book for you. Definitely interesting conversational topics/debate material. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 12/4/2012

    " One of the best books I've ever read. Not only do the authors have a thoroughly entertaining writing style, they seriously expanded my understanding of evolution on both a macro and micro level. If I were back in college, this book might have inspired me to switch majors! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 11/6/2012

    " Evolution, natural selection, and reproduction are explained in a very rudimentary fashion. At times, I wondered if I had purchased a book from the junior readers club. However, the information is fascinating. This is what we should have been learning in biology class! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug Ward | 10/8/2012

    " This book should be a must read for everyone! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fivereaders | 8/3/2012

    " Fascinating book about why some diseases helped us to survive. I was most interested in diabetes and it seems it may have been beneficial to be a diabetic when the Younger Dryas happened. This books explains the science/medical aspects behind why some diseases were necessary for life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chara | 4/4/2012

    " This is like a short story anthology for science nerds! It has a bunch of small stories about different adaptations. Very interesting. Great, easy read-even for non-science nerds! It got me to do some more in-depth research on a lot of topics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 beck | 12/12/2011

    " facisnating and fantastically written "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 iamtedae | 9/2/2011

    " Absolutely fascinating, eminently readable. Quite a bit of logic tied to common sense. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 7/21/2011

    " A lot of interesting tidbits related to the evolutionary process of the human species, including genetics, stem, cells, understanding disease. Would have liked more "personal interest" type scenarios as well. Definitely food for thought. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin | 5/20/2011

    " Evolutionary reasons why some diseases exist and have helped us survive. Great research and a new way to look at genes and traits. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chara | 4/22/2011

    " This is like a short story anthology for science nerds! It has a bunch of small stories about different adaptations. Very interesting. Great, easy read-even for non-science nerds! It got me to do some more in-depth research on a lot of topics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yasmin | 4/14/2011

    " A typical boring science book, I'm afraid.
    I made myself read it all because I am very interested in the subject.
    Very glad I am done with it, and I got a couple of useful information.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scarlett | 3/20/2011

    " Fun with genetics! Written in a fun style that makes it very approachable to the laymen. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack | 1/19/2011

    " Very interesting! Would like to know more about different diseases and cancer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany | 1/17/2011

    " Great book! Interesting thoughts about why certain diseases are prevalent in society today even though they give no evolutionary advantage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 12/31/2010

    " Very interesting- does have one error about inheritence though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 12/23/2010

    " A really great read about evolution and how diseases are maintained. A good read for anyone interested in disease and human evolution. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryce | 11/19/2010

    " Read this immediately. It should be mandatory reading for everyone. Not just science-types...everyone. After the holidays, I'm buying 2 copies of this. One for my permanent collection, and one to put into circulation among those who want an interesting read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alex | 10/16/2010

    " I didn't think I would enjoy a non-fiction, but it turned out amazing! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristina | 9/10/2010

    " One of the coolest books I have ever read. Science is awesome! I learned a lot from this book, even though the chapters about mitochondrial DNA were a little difficult to comprehend. I would like to read this again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shalaka | 8/1/2010

    " Started off really interesting, had some slow parts. Overall pretty good if you like books like Freakanomics, etc. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eileen | 7/29/2010

    " Diseases or illnesses you have when you are young can come back to haunt you when you are older. "

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About the Author

Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD, is an award-winning physician, scientist, inventor, and New York Times bestselling author. He has been awarded over twenty patents worldwide for his inventions in the field of biotechnology and human health. His scientific work led to the discovery of Siderocillin, the first in a novel class of antibiotic compounds directed against multidrug-resistant microorganisms or “superbugs.” Dr. Moalem has also cofounded two biotechnology companies and has served as an associate editor for the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

About the Narrator

Eric Conger is a stage actor, voice artist, and award-winning audiobook narrator. He has narrated more than 125 fiction and nonfiction audiobooks and was a four-time finalist for the Audie Award, both as a sole narrator in 2007 and 2008 and as part of a multicast reading in 2001 and 2012. He has earned six AudioFile Earphones Awards. His extensive voice-over work includes more than 5,000 narrations for commercial ventures. A graduate of Wesleyan University and the University of Paris, he also works as a writer and playwright. He has appeared in over fifty plays and has also translated plays of Molière and Feydeau for regional theaters. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and two children.