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Download Stop Acting Rich: And Start Living Like a Real Millionaire Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Stop Acting Rich: And Start Living Like a Real Millionaire (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Thomas J. Stanley
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (345 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas J. Stanley Narrator: Fred Stella Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2009 ISBN:
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With the current financial crisis, high unemployment, and tight credit, you may be saying to yourself: Who is acting rich these days? We're barely making ends meet. The reality is that the recession may have caused us to take a breather, but every indication is that we will pick up right where we left off when gentler economic winds blow again. Before you spend another dime, listen to this audiobook and understand how to become rich instead of acting rich.

It all starts with where you live. Live in a prestige neighborhood and you will spend more on everything from your car to your watch. Real millionaires understand that living in communities where their neighbors have less net worth than they do naturally leads to spending less. It's easier to be rich when keeping up with the Joneses hardly costs anything. Life satisfaction comes not from cruising down the highway in a chunk of your net worth, but from having the financial resources to choose - to spend time with family and friends, to volunteer, to pursue interests.

Best-selling author of The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind and leading authority on the wealthy, Dr. Thomas Stanley uncovers the truth that few people become rich by way of a high income, and even fewer high-income people are truly rich. The good news is that almost anyone can become wealthy - even without a super high income. Just stop acting...and instead start living like a rich person. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Olexandr Prokhorenko | 2/13/2014

    " While the concept is correct, it can be depressing and confusing if you will try to apply as-is. Biased opinion with not much efforts taken to confront ideas. Many of the points can be argued (ie. lawyer who drives 5 y.o. Toyota will have hard time selling his services for lots of cash leading to decrease on income). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nate | 2/4/2014

    " Dr. Stanley provides real market research into the attitudes of millionaires in America. The data show that your typical millionaire is not a hyerspender or hyperconsumer rather they are fiscally conservative individuals who get pleasure out of activities in life that don't require having money. It is their approach to life that makes them successful in all aspects, including financially. A must read for someone wanting to understand more about millionaires, their purchasing habits, and what makes the majority of rich Americans rich. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 1/31/2014

    " It was as good as a "money book" could be. :) Good supplement to anything Dave Ramsey. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Justus | 1/11/2014

    " A follow-up to Stanley's "Millionaire Next Door" book. Worth reading BEFORE you buy that BMW or McMansion. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Stacey | 1/10/2014

    " This was painful. Very very very repetetive. The basis of the book is most millionaire are frugal. If you need to learn this go with Dave Ramsey he is a far better writer are the subject of helping you become a millionaire. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wayne Elgin | 12/30/2013

    " A decent update on the already thought-provoking material. If the points seem restated, I'm guessing it's because Stanley is anticipating all of the counter arguments and hypothetical justifications the intended audience will use to internally discredit his findings and their implications. Written more like a thesis than a mainstream work, the sheer quantity if statistics can be daunting to follow. But it rewards you with informational talking and insightful mulling points. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Wade | 12/20/2013

    " I thought there were some great tips. All in all- live below your means and you'll be fine. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Holly Jorgenson | 12/14/2013

    " Not fantastic. This author seemed more concerned with alcoholic beverages than actually saving money. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katy | 12/2/2013

    " Really didn't need to read this book as mom and dad taught me the principles "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Angie | 10/21/2013

    " I had to read it for school. It was okay - he has a tenancy to hyper-focus on certain "badges of wealth" that frankly I could care less about. There wasn't a ton of tangible advice either. It was very philosophical, which is fine. . . I guess. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cathy | 3/3/2013

    " It was repetitious and I could not relate to it as it seemed to be written for people with high incomes (not me). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cassandra Sells bushman | 10/16/2012

    " The updated version of Millionaire Next Door. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bryan Stevenson | 10/13/2012

    " The subject matter was excellent. I agree with many of the points, and the idea that frugality leads to true wealth is a powerful lesson. I gave it two stars because the entire book could have been written as a 5 page essay. There was way too much repeated info. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greg | 8/24/2012

    " If you've read The Millionaire Next Door, not much new here. It seemed very repetitive as I had read that book recently. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 6/25/2012

    " I liked the concept and the major point of this book - my only problem is that the point was made in the first chapter. The rest of the book had a few interesting case studies and stories, but nothing that really added to the first chapter. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Milkman3367 | 6/10/2012

    " Well researched, but basically a work of repetition...from the author's previous books, and within the book itself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam Frentzel-Beyme | 2/10/2012

    " Real life information about wealth that you won't find taught in any finance undergrad or MBA program. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan | 2/7/2012

    " Analytical follow-up to "The Millionaire Next Door". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Annette | 12/19/2011

    " A third hit for Thomas Stanley. You would think Mr. Stanley would have run out of information or re-hashed parts from his previous two books, but no Mr. Stanley has more interesting information about "the millionaire". "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lori Kincaid | 11/17/2011

    " There was nothing new here, and he could have summed up his latest research in one chapter. Of course, that would keep him from selling books which might make him no longer one of the Millionaires next door... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rpleshette | 5/4/2011

    " The book had a good concept and I did learn a lot from it. However, I could only bring myself to skim through it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 2/21/2011

    " I thought there were some great tips. All in all- live below your means and you'll be fine. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Paul | 2/16/2011

    " Unfortunatly, it had one theme, to stop acting rich. Meaning, don't spend money on things to look rich. Use your money wisely. A good idea, but not for a whole book. I tried to like it, but no go. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peter | 1/30/2011

    " Written by an actuary whose job was to gather data on millionaires. Statistically surprising information on how the rich really live and spend their money. They didn't get rich by spending it on showy material items. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 1/11/2011

    " Extremely useful information for the younger crowd. For us older folks it was kind of like reading a book about child rearing after your kid's in prison. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chuck | 9/4/2010

    " Interesting research about every day millionaires and their habits...most people that you think have money actually have negative balance sheets...very interesting stuff... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jennifer | 8/18/2010

    " Very repetitive...seemed like an article stretched and padded to become a book. I didn't notice anything new, compared to The millionaire next door. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephanie | 8/1/2010

    " Honestly, I could not finish this book. I stopped at the second chapter. I have read his other books and absolutely lived all of them. If you are new to his writing, perhaps you will enjoy this. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lorifrances | 6/24/2010

    " There was nothing new here, and he could have summed up his latest research in one chapter. Of course, that would keep him from selling books which might make him no longer one of the Millionaires next door... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jessica | 6/2/2010

    " Another adult non fiction. I'm getting old or something. This one was a little dry, but very enlightening about real net worth vs. ostentatious badges of wealth and states of happiness, or overall life satisfaction among the wealthy. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 3/28/2010

    " If you've read The Millionaire Next Door there's really not much new in this book. He's beating a dead horse at this point. "

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About the Author
Thomas J. Stanley is the bestselling author—with over four million copies in print—of The Millionaire Mind and The Millionaire Next Door. The recognized authority on the lifestyles and behaviors of the affluent, Dr. Stanley is frequently quoted in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Forbes, Fortune, Time, Money magazine, U.S. News & World Report, Reader’s Digest, and USA Today. He has appeared numerous times on the Today show, 20/20, and The Oprah Winfrey Show. Visit Dr. Stanley at www.thomasjstanley.com.
About the Narrator

Fred Stella has worked as an actor and voice talent in radio, television, independent films, and audio books. He was awarded the Publishers Weekly Listen Up Award for Best Male Narration in 2002. He makes his home in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and is on the adjunct faculty staff of Muskegon Community College.