Extended Audio Sample

Download Stamboul Train Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Stamboul Train (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Graham Greene
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,352 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Graham Greene Narrator: Michael Maloney Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

Aboard the Orient Express as it heads across Europe towards Constantinople, a relationship develops between Carleton Myatt and Coral Musker, a naive English chorus girl. Around them a web of espionage, murder and lies twist in this spy thriller. Download and start listening now!

BK_BBCW_002559

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colleen | 2/17/2014

    " I did not enjoy this as much as some of Greene's other novels, but it had excellent characters. The long train trip throughout Europe allows many characters to get on and off the train and have various adventures. These are skillfully interwoven and develop the characters throughout. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith | 2/1/2014

    " I like Graham Greene's writing style - held my interest. It was interesting to see how he wove all of these characters into a cohesive story. Not quite the ending I expected, or hoped for, but still a good read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 rachel | 1/28/2014

    " Ehh, it was OK. I do like how the arc of the story follows the movement of the train. As characters leave the train (usually not by choice) we continue on with the rest of the cast. But kind of boring in the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara Barna | 1/22/2014

    " Green's anti-semitism is cringe-inducing to this modern reader but I couldn't help but be riveted by these strangers on a train, written (1931) when the concept was still fresh. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kate | 1/21/2014

    " I don't think that this is Greene's strongest work - he even admitted it at the time that he wrote it. Primarily it was written so that it could be made into a movie and earn him some money. I enjoyed pieces of it, but it was a little slow as a character study until the revelation in the last paragraphs. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 1/11/2014

    " Initially really enjoyed this book but I'm about 1/3 way through and it's become a real slog.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karyn | 12/20/2013

    " This is Graham Greene, so of course it is well written, but I didn't like it as much as I liked some of his other works. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 gaby | 12/19/2013

    " I'll go a long way for Greene. But I draw the line at unapologetic anti-Semitism, homophobia and totally outdated gender stereotypes. PS: no spies in this book anyway ! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Troy | 12/19/2013

    " I've never taken an overnight train trip, and usually a train story makes me want to 'All Aboard, Amtrak' in a big way. Not so much, this one. Compared to the later Greene's I've read, this one pales a bit, but it's a short read, and worth the time as an 'Entertainment'. The characters are all recognizable types from early genre cinema (Greene was a big film buff), and apparently wrote this novel with the intent of having it adapted for the screen. Recognizable as they are, they are all pretty shallow and unlikeable, with the exception of maybe one. Each character boarding the train is fairly limited to his or her tightly bounded personality and destiny, either self-imposed or forced upon by society, and one hopes as the train advances inexorably to its destination, that some of the characters might be strong enough to overcome some of these defeating stereotypes and labels as the challenges surmount. And although some of the characters are successful in at least recognizing the opportunity to take the high road, none is really strong enough to overcome their own inertia. It is perhaps good when we travel that most of our conversations and experiences with fellow-travellers remain for the most part superficial, because what lies underneath the veil of superficiality amongst strangers, were it to be exposed, may just spoil our fun. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stef Onthesea | 12/3/2013

    " Like a trip. A good ticket. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 10/17/2013

    " This is one of Graham Greene's more "commercial" novels and was written to appeal to a broad audience. It has a plot that moves at a good clipping pace and has several intriguing characters whose stories become intertwined. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh Brown | 7/28/2013

    " Fun book if you romanticize train travel, and drama. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephen C. | 3/5/2013

    " More and more insights to people and their motives for almost anything. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Phoebe | 1/3/2013

    " I found myself caring about one character way way more than any of the others (it's an intertwining subplots kind of book -- everyone's on the train at some point), which made me start skimming the other parts. But her part was extremely well written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David Davenport | 11/17/2012

    " Can't go wrong with Graham Greene. All the elements are here: comedy, grief, angst. Strangely haunting references to fear of anti-semitism when you consider what happened in Europe a decade after the book was written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will | 11/5/2012

    " This is my first Greene book and I found it long and slow going. I was disappointed with the ending. I felt there was no closure. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris Lockhart | 10/22/2012

    " It took too long for this novel to get interesting. The ending would've been more effective if I had actually cared about any of the characters. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eunice | 4/27/2012

    " Having subsequently read the author's own thoughts on this book I will not review it except to say it was in some ways very much a book of its time which seems now very dated. The author himself has highlighted its flaws. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carol | 11/23/2011

    " This was like reading a movie script, scenes kept flashing through my mind. Greene has a way of setting up the atmosphere for the passenger's on the train. You know you are going to meet some interesting people and drop into their lives for a short while. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeanne | 10/5/2011

    " I felt the author was more concerned with amusing his readers than with developing his characters or plot. That said, for the most part this was a throughly enjoyable train ride with an interesting cast of characters. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 8/5/2011

    " Along with 'Travels with my Aunt' one of his best ones, makes you want to get on a train. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Corinne | 4/3/2011

    " I was in need of a good, character-driven book, and Greene delivered. His ability as a storyteller really shone and his characters felt authentic throughout. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith | 2/10/2011

    " I like Graham Greene's writing style - held my interest. It was interesting to see how he wove all of these characters into a cohesive story. Not quite the ending I expected, or hoped for, but still a good read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 1/31/2011

    " Green's anti-semitism is cringe-inducing to this modern reader but I couldn't help but be riveted by these strangers on a train, written (1931) when the concept was still fresh. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 1/31/2011

    " Along with 'Travels with my Aunt' one of his best ones, makes you want to get on a train. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tommy | 11/19/2010

    " Early Greene and not nearly as good as some of his other works. The buildup was there but the end was weak. Characters just disappeared without any denouement or clarity. Sometimes that works with a novel but it left me feeling unsatisfied. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kit | 10/13/2010

    " Finally got into it around the halfway point, but I did find the period oh-so-British anti-Semitism a bit grating. Probably better than the movie version, though. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cassio | 8/4/2010

    " O trem é interessante, a viagem deve ser interessante, mas o livro é bem chatinho... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 gaby | 7/7/2010

    " I'll go a long way for Greene. But I draw the line at unapologetic anti-Semitism, homophobia and totally outdated gender stereotypes. PS: no spies in this book anyway ! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will | 7/5/2010

    " This is my first Greene book and I found it long and slow going. I was disappointed with the ending. I felt there was no closure. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeanette | 6/28/2010

    " All of the characters were just so well thought of... Interesting how all their lives were intertwined in some way....good read "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Graham Greene

Graham Greene (1904–1991) was an English novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. He was an ardent convert to Catholicism, and religious themes are at the root of much of his writing. He served with the Secret Intelligence Service during the Second World War. His novels are set in places in a state of seedy decay, and many of his locations, such as Vietnam in The Quiet American and Cuba in Our Man in Havana, became international crisis spots.

About the Narrator

Michael Maloney is an actor who has appeared in numerous television productions, including as Romeo in Romeo and Juliet and Prince Hal in Henry IV, parts 1 and 2, for which he won Best Actor/Best Supporting Actor awards. His theater credits include Sleuth, Peer Gynt, and All My Sons, and his film credits include The Young Victoria and Notes on a Scandal. He has narrated numerous audiobooks, earning seven AudioFile Earphones Awards.