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Download Sons and Lovers Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Sons and Lovers Audiobook, by D. H. Lawrence
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (18,831 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: D. H. Lawrence Narrator: Paul Copley Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2012 ISBN:
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Penguin Classics presents D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers, adapted for audio and available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by Paul Copley.

She was a brazen hussy.

She wasn't. - And she was pretty, wasn't she?

I didn't look...

And tell your girls, my son, that when they're running after you, they're not to come and ask your mother for you - tell them that - brazen baggage's you meet at dancing classes.

The marriage of Gertrude and Walter Morel has become a battleground. Repelled by her uneducated and sometimes violent husband, delicate Gertrude devotes her life to her children, especially to her sons, William and Paul - determined they will not follow their father into working down the coal mines. But conflict is evitable when Paul seeks to escape his mother's suffocating grasp through relationships with women his own age. Set in Lawrence's native Nottinghamshire, Sons and Lovers is a highly autobiographical and compelling portrayal of childhood, adolescence and the clash of generations.

Part of a series of vintage recordings taken from the Penguin Archives. Affordable, collectable, quality productions - perfect for on-the-go listening.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 sidiklikontes | 2/16/2014

    " A Freudian reading makes it perfect, otherwise it is boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juliane | 2/14/2014

    " Here they are, the great themes of literature: love and friendship, death and loss all nicely wrapped up in a coming of age story. The main character Paul Morel will be only too familiar to most readers, his struggle to take on responsibility, to develop while trying to stay moral towards those he loves and needs. Thinking himself firm and strong at a young age he almost breaks under the strain of his own flaws and a world that doesn't offer perfect solutions especially not when others are involved. This novel couldn't be more topical and I loved reading it! There is, however, the odd imperfection e.g. some over-narrating where I would have liked the characters to just act on their own, a few repetitions and very seldom an implausability concerning the protagonist's actions. Don't let this put you off reading the book, though, since all of those little blemishes are more than counterbalanced by the overall very high quality of Lawrence's writing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 W.B. | 2/13/2014

    " This would be in my top ten of all time novels...many slots I'd have to think about...but this one would be there with absolute certainty...he was a force of nature...I think this is the kind of naturalistic novel Zola was itching to write...and I don't think he ever did... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Karyn | 2/12/2014

    " Long and laborious and a bit pointless. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Twila | 2/9/2014

    " Summer reading at the pool "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Luxagraf | 1/29/2014

    " On every side the immense dark silence seemed pressing him, so tiny a speck, into extinction, and yet, almost nothing, he could not be extinct. Night, in which everything was lost, went reaching out, beyond stars and sun. "Stars and sun, a few bright grains, went spinning round for terror and holding each other in embrace, there in a darkness that outpassed them all and left them tiny and daunted. So much, and himself, infinitesimal, at the core a nothingness, and yet not nothing." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ted | 1/16/2014

    " Just a story. Not hard to read, but not very interesting. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Peachykean | 1/12/2014

    " It was TOOOOOOO LOOOOOOOOooooonnnngggg and NOTHING really happens. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 ann | 12/27/2013

    " i don't know about this book. parts of it were really beautifully written, especially early on but my god it dragged. glad i read it but can't exactly recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda Fletcher | 12/24/2013

    " Infuriating at times, due mainly to the suffocating influence a mother has on her sons life. A freudian study if ever I saw one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzanne | 12/23/2013

    " I need to re-read this book. Every once in a while I think about it but can only remember a patch or an image, so I should re-read it to see why I keep thinking about it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam O'Connor | 12/12/2013

    " obviously a classic. a long read, but worth it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine | 11/28/2013

    " Getting through the classics is tough sometimes! Parts of this book were amazing but the rest was a complete snoozefest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly Harrison | 10/31/2013

    " I stopped reading this book about 30 pages before its end. I think I'll give it another try some day... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Justin Smolin | 5/18/2013

    " first 2/3rds a great, vast book about relationships-fathers, mothers, children. last 1/3rd reads more like an existentialist novel-plus his line on sex, the life force, etc. great stuff, all round "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marius van Blerck | 5/18/2013

    " A short novel of growing up, and the conflicts that face us all, at once dated and enduring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Milkman3367 | 4/26/2013

    " A decent, though surprisingly soulless, tragedy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 kunkku | 2/18/2013

    " my first of many lawrence reads... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Benjamin Kowalsky | 1/21/2013

    " I've never seen someone get so worked up for kissing in my life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bruce | 11/28/2012

    " Another Lawrence tour-de-force. Exquisite portrayal of coming of age and intergenerational struggles for liberation and self-realization. Masterful! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lorna | 11/19/2012

    " I learned not to take critics words for what is good. I did not like the book, I thought it confusing and gloomy. It jumped all over the place and half the time it was hard to tell who he was talking about. I kept hoping it would get better but it didn't. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Olivia | 11/8/2012

    " D.H. Lawrence captures relationships without the smarmy emotions oozing on the page, but this book is boring and his others, especially "Lady Chatterly's Lover," get the point much more elegantly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynne - The Book Squirrel | 10/19/2012

    " This is only the second D H Lawrence novel I have read. I thought it wasvery good. I did begin to think that Paul was a bit of a mummy's boy and that anoid me! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Martine | 9/30/2012

    " In this book, love is a prison and loving you is a reason to hate someone. It paints a very dark picture of life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lila | 9/16/2012

    " Beautiful D.H.Lawrence, close your eyes to his language & perception of e-m-o-t-i-o-n. Can't help but to think though that he's using his characters as tools for his polemic. And why do his characters have so much goddamn trembling feeling? "

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About the Author

David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930), novelist, short-story writer, poet, critic, playwright, and essayist, was one of the most important and controversial figures of twentieth-century English literature. His works confront the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization and are notable for their passionate intensity and for a sensuality that centers on the erotic. Though his opinions earned him enemies, persecution, and censorship during his lifetime, he is now recognized as an artistic visionary.