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Download Six Walks in the Fictional Woods Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Six Walks in the Fictional Woods (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Umberto Eco
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (757 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Umberto Eco Narrator: Nick Sullivan Publisher: University Press Audiobooks Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2011 ISBN:
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In this exhilarating book, we accompany Umberto Eco as he explores the intricacies of fictional form and method. Using examples ranging from fairy tales and Flaubert, Poe and Mickey Spillane, Eco draws us in by means of a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the investigation of some of fiction's most basic mechanisms. These six lectures in Harvard's prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Lectures invite readers to reexamine how they read and how much is expected of them. Eco argues that any actual reader is an empirical reader with a specific personal reading context. As such, each individual reader is only part of the model reader, the author's composite imagined listener. But the individual author, always distinct from the narrator is also only part of the model author whose stylistic strategies help all readers infer what the characteristics of the model reader are and, in turn, what those of the model author are. The book is published by Harvard University Press.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 2/20/2014

    " Interesting lectures about the relationship between author, reader and truth. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emilie | 2/10/2014

    " Take a stroll with Mr Eco. See fiction in a bunch of new ways. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 2/9/2014

    " That was fun. Reader response criticism at its best! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rory | 1/31/2014

    " Literally like walking through the woods, as in I had a pretty hard time following him (the essay titles didn't help at all) and most of the time had no idea where he was going with any given argument. I think I might have learned something, but I'm not sure if I can articulate what it was.. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kit | 1/27/2014

    " Entertaining, but a little stale in the idea department. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathryn | 1/10/2014

    " Although Eco's voice doesn't make me want to have a pizza with him and hang out, the information he gives on pacing a story is invaluable. This book changed the way I look at my own writing -- and helped me explain story structure to others. It's not a beach read, but well worth a look. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 12/21/2013

    " One of the best collections of essays I've read. It changed and deepened my understanding of the experience of reading fiction. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 11/29/2013

    " Umberto Eco in form of short lectures shows the methods of writing using examples from popular literature like fairy tales and classics like works od Edgar Allan Poe. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elena Moison | 9/4/2013

    " One of the books that changed my way of perceiving a book. Highly recomended! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 8/22/2013

    " Good stuff on the reader-author, fiction-reality relationship. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia | 4/5/2013

    " Great lectures on techniques for structuring fiction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Irena | 12/29/2012

    " Lots of food for thought, as always with Umberto Eco's lectures and essays. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanna | 8/19/2012

    " Enjoyable short essays. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 5/29/2012

    " These are delightful, funny talks about story. Easy for a wee beginner like me he makes it very approachable, as he he talks about Sylvie, Proust and his forefathers in memory walking and writing, and leads me through some roles we play as reader and as author.Fab. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 3/16/2012

    " Read for college FYI In the Beginning Was the Word. Revisited several times since for other projects "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elena | 9/25/2011

    " One of the books that changed my way of perceiving a book. Highly recomended! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aurora | 8/5/2011

    " Literally like walking through the woods, as in I had a pretty hard time following him (the essay titles didn't help at all) and most of the time had no idea where he was going with any given argument. I think I might have learned something, but I'm not sure if I can articulate what it was.. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 5/26/2011

    " That was fun. Reader response criticism at its best! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kit | 4/21/2011

    " Entertaining, but a little stale in the idea department. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 4/5/2010

    " These are delightful, funny talks about story. Easy for a wee beginner like me he makes it very approachable, as he he talks about Sylvie, Proust and his forefathers in memory walking and writing, and leads me through some roles we play as reader and as author.Fab. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 2/3/2010

    " Good stuff on the reader-author, fiction-reality relationship. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 2/22/2009

    " One of the best collections of essays I've read. It changed and deepened my understanding of the experience of reading fiction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gabriel | 8/2/2008

    " These essays are based on a series of lectures that Umberto Eco gave at Harvard in the early nineties which I attended. Not much remains but the sheer wonder at his analytic abilities. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathryn | 8/2/2008

    " Although Eco's voice doesn't make me want to have a pizza with him and hang out, the information he gives on pacing a story is invaluable. This book changed the way I look at my own writing -- and helped me explain story structure to others. It's not a beach read, but well worth a look. "

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About the Author
Author Umberto EcoUmberto Eco is an Italian semiotician philosopher, literary critic, and novelist. He is the author of The Name of the Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, and The Prague Cemetery, all bestsellers in many languages, as well as a number of influential scholarly works.
About the Narrator

Nick Sullivan has worked extensively on Broadway and at many theaters throughout the United States. His television credits include The Good Wife, Madame Secretary, Boardwalk Empire, 30 Rock, Elementary, Alpha House, Royal Pains, All My Children, Reading Rainbow, and all three Law & Order series. Film credits include Our Idiot Brother, Prison Song, and Puccini for Beginners. He has recorded hundreds of audiobooks, is an Audie Award winner, and has received numerous AudioFile Earphones Awards.