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Download Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear (Dramatized) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear (Dramatized) Audiobook, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
3.78 out of 53.78 out of 53.78 out of 53.78 out of 53.78 out of 5 3.78 (23 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Narrator: Clive Merrison, Michael Williams, and Full Cast Publisher: AudioGO Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2005 ISBN:
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A coded warning of imminent danger sends Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson to the fortress-like country house of the reclusive Jack Douglas. When they arrive too late to prevent a tragic death, the great detective and his chronicler must follow a series of bewildering clues to find a murderer who has vanished into thin air. Only then will they solve the mystery of the dead man's desperate plea: 'Am I never going to get out of the valley of fear?'

What is the connection between a corpse with a missing face and a ruthless secret society which once terrorised a desolate region of the United States? With the aid of a local guidebook, a missing dumb-bell, and Dr Watson's umbrella, Holmes unravels a tangled web which stretches over fifteen years and two continents; and in the centre of that web lurks the sinister presence of the most brilliant criminal mind in all England: Professor James Moriarty. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J.J. | 2/14/2014

    " Another fantastic Sherlock Holmes novel. I only wish there were more. Time to dig into the short stories! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Russell Grant | 2/10/2014

    " Holmes final novel I think. 2nd last book in this reprint series anyways. Damned solid stuff too. The mystery itself was a good one, and it borrowed the format that made "A Study In Scarlett" so good, way back in the very first Holmes novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sean Kottke | 2/8/2014

    " The last Holmes novel fills in some of the blanks in the story of arch-nemesis Moriarty, who nonetheless remains off-stage, yet casts a dark shadow over everything. The initial murder mystery that sets the story going is really a variation on themes established in several of the earlier Holmes stories. There's a big break in the narrative to fill in the back story, a la Study in Scarlet, which makes for a mildly entertaining melodrama despite the absence of Holmes and despite its leaning heavily on plot twists reused in so many movies and TV serials that they're predictable from a long way off. For no good reason, every time I read the title Valley of Fear, I make a mental association with Valley of Gwangi, and I get a little disappointed that this novel doesn't involve Sherlock Holmes investigating dinosaurs. Is that so wrong? :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caitlin | 2/1/2014

    " I took this to be one of Conan Doyle's attempts to write a story using the trappings of Holmes without writing a Holmes story. Valley of Fear is another one of those tales that makes America seem properly frightening and lawless. In any case, without giving too much away, this could easily be two stories, first a typical Holmes short story and second a story about a criminal union-cum-secret society in coal country. I found the prose more fluid than some of the other Holmes stories I read, but the book itself is not unified. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 ManicMyna | 1/17/2014

    " the second half of this tale is vastly different to the first, & when Doyle does this it really stuffs the narrative of the tale "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 CatBookMom | 1/13/2014

    " From Recorded Books 1999, narrated by Patrick Tull "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Neil | 12/9/2013

    " The best book I have read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathy Reid | 12/7/2013

    " I love mysteries! I enjoyed this one. There's nobody like Sherlock! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Astrid | 10/25/2013

    " The only Sherlock Holmes novel I've not read... time to give it a go! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anuradha | 7/20/2013

    " Not much appealing. I always wondered how the two friends met. The introduction,the meeting and the bonding between holmes and watson were of true class. The storyline dint have much of charisma. Overall it was ok. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 arg/machine | 5/16/2013

    " One man takes on a ruthless criminal gang operating in coal fields... and wins! And then Sherlock Holmes enters the scene... A Conan Doyle classic, The Valley of Fear is in the public domain, with a free electronic copy here. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Philip Elliott | 2/28/2013

    " Unlike some the The Hound of the Baskervilles I was completely thrown of the trail on this one. What a great ending. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rohit | 2/4/2013

    " The second part of story was so boring that I didn't even read it. But the case was good.....but not as great as the hound of Baskervilles.. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joy | 4/21/2011

    " Awesome! I think I loved second part of the novel best. Doyle did a great job telling a very thrilling tale. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 4/2/2011

    " I love Sherlock Holmes' character, and he was only in the first half, then the very end, so those were definitely my favorite parts. But, the second half that doesn't have Holmes was still interesting. We listened to this while puzzling, and it was time very enjoyably spent! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 2/14/2011

    " Slower than some Sherlock Holmes books, but excellent as always. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon Byrd | 2/5/2011

    " The first half was really super super fun! The second half was the back story, which was still good, but there was no Sherlock Holmes, which is the best part of reading a Sherlock Holmes novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve Gillway | 7/4/2010

    " This book gives us another glimpse of the dreaded Moriarty. A tale of two halves and in one way very similar to the very first Sherlock Holmes' story. Written to a high standard "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott L. | 9/30/2008

    " Very good compilation of Holmes stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bettie | 9/8/2008

    " Revenge and treachery link a Sussex country house with the secret societies of 1890s America. With Clive Merrison as Holmes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bionikchickens | 4/2/2006

    " I think I prefer the shorter stories of Holmes the best "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ahk | 10/29/2005

    " Interesting structure - the first half is a more traditional Holmesian mystery, the second half is the mystery behind the mystery, without Holmes. The short stories are better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William Herbst | 5/24/2005

    " I enjoyed the parts set in London but the chapters in Pennsylvania were a bit of a drag. "

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About the Author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) was born of Irish parentage in Scotland. He studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, but he also had a passion for storytelling. His first book introduced that prototype of the modern detective in fiction, Sherlock Holmes. Despite the immense popularity Holmes gained throughout the world, Doyle was not overly fond of the character and preferred to write other stories. Eventually popular demand won out and he continued to satisfy readers with the adventures of the legendary sleuth. He also wrote historical romances and made two essays into pseudoscientific fantasy: The Lost World and The Poison Belt.