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Download Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Alexandra Fuller
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,157 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Alexandra Fuller Narrator: Lisette Lecat Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2004 ISBN:
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When Alexandra (Bo) Fuller was home in Zambia a few years ago, visiting her parents for Christmas, she asked her father about a nearby banana farmer who was known for being a tough bugger. Her father's response was a warning to steer clear of him; he told Bo: Curiosity scribbled the cat. Nonetheless, Fuller began her strange friendship with the man she calls K, a white African and veteran of the Rhodesian war. With the same fiercely beautiful prose that won her acclaim for Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, Fuller here recounts her friendship with K.

K is, seemingly, a man of contradictions: tattooed, battle scarred, and weathered by farm work, he is a lion of a man, feral and bulletproof. Yet he is also a born-again Christian, given to weeping when he recollects his failed romantic life, and more than anything else welling up inside with memories of battle. For his war, like all wars, was a brutal one, marked by racial strife, jungle battles, unimaginable tortures, and the murdering of innocent civilians, and K has blood on his hands.

Driven by K's memories, Fuller and K decide to enter the heart of darkness in the most literal way, by traveling from Zambia through Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) and Mozambique to visit the scenes of the war and to meet other veterans. It is a strange journey into the past, one marked at once by somber reflections and odd humor. What results from Fuller's journey is a remarkably unbiased and unsentimental glimpse of men who have killed, mutilated, tortured, and scrambled to survive during wartime and who now must attempt to live with their past and live past their sins. In these men, too, we get a glimpse of life in Africa, a land that besets its creatures with pests, plagues, and natural disasters, making the people there at once more hardened and more vulnerable than elsewhere.

Scribbling the Cat is an engrossing and haunting look at war, Africa, and the lines of sanity.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ana | 2/17/2014

    " This book was OK. I was expecting something better after reading "Don't let's go to the dogs tonight" by the same author. While the topic of the book is interesting (travels with an African warrior), the book reads like a newspaper - perhaps because the author is a journalist?! The whole book could have been written in a much more interesting way. Some atrocities are described in detail and yet the narrative fails to "speak" to me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Isabel | 2/17/2014

    " Haunting, brutal, honest and funny at times, this is the kind of book that stays with you long after you have put it down. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristin | 2/15/2014

    " Wow. This was better than Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight. Fuller's ability to write truth without judgment is remarkable. She is also blindingly honest about her own shortcomings - yet sans regret. I felt both privileged and enraged to see Mozambique through K's perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 prairiesister | 2/15/2014

    " Omigod, what a book. Can't recommend it enough. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel | 2/13/2014

    " Let me start by saying not everyone should read this. It is raw, dirty, and real. There are very few stories that get to the heart of what the white soliders of Africa go through. It also looks at race in a really different way that I think most Americans can't understand. It is pure Africa take it or leave it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Katie | 1/7/2014

    " it was too choppy - the narrative was hard to follow "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marija | 1/5/2014

    " Fuller focuses on the effects of war on her generation while telling the story of one African soldier. Her achingly beautiful prose juxtaposed with the horrors of the subject make this a powerful read. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the wonderful Lisette Lecat. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Karen | 12/21/2013

    " Fascinating, well-written, but hated the content. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nic | 12/20/2013

    " Powerful and tragic tale. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katherine | 11/26/2013

    " I couldn't figure out what Fuller was doing running around Africa with "K" but it is an interesting book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ayla | 11/22/2013

    " Another gem from Lisa's bookshelf. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abby Sominski | 11/6/2013

    " Not as good as the first but definitely a great read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sabah | 10/21/2013

    " What happened here? Book without focus and selfish characters. Written as a adult follow-up to Fuller's book on her childhood. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sandi | 8/24/2013

    " This was well written and extremely well narrated by Lisette Lecat but was sometimes hard to listen to and was definitely more about the journey than the destination. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Geoff | 8/23/2013

    " Not quite as good as her first book, but still a very good read. I think her point was a little lost at times, but she paints such vivid pictures with her words that it's hard to stop reading. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nancy Mcdaniel | 6/10/2013

    " After reading Fuller's first book (Don't let's go to the Dogs Tonight) I had high expectations. This book suffers by comparison though as a standalone I probably would have liked it better. Still worth reading "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Truthmonkey | 6/3/2013

    " I read Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tomight and enjoyed it, but I think I liked this one better. I don't think I would be friends with Alexandra Fuller, but I do like her writing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caroline | 4/29/2013

    " I did enjoy this book and would rate it closer to 3/5 stars. I thought her first one was more enjoyable. This one seemed disjointed and off the tracks a bit. I felt that she was a little uncomfortable writing it. All in all, a very good book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amanda | 10/28/2012

    " this is different from her earlier book in the fact that this is stories of war, fighting and death, told to the author from "K", who was a soldier in the war. These are stories of the brutality and the casualties of war. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy Louton | 10/21/2012

    " Not as funny & witty as her others but much more real in terms of the actual division between people growing up there and being native. A very interesting introspective. Well worth the read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meghan | 6/17/2012

    " Not as compelling as Don't Let's Go and lacking a strong driving plot, this was nonetheless told in Fuller's engaging style. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 3/21/2012

    " Listened to audio of this after her Don't Go to the Dogs ... book. Interesting, but not w/ the depth of the other book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcie | 12/21/2011

    " Beautiful, savage, haunting, devastating... Africa, love, hate, war. I can't find the words right now, I am still raw with emotion. Fuller is a writer of supreme talent, truly gifted . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melitta | 12/5/2011

    " The author visits her parents in Zambia, then she goes to Mozambique with a white ex-army Rhodie. Graphic descriptions, slightly odd. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 6/11/2011

    " Eye opening! Gives you a "in your face" view of the emotional effects of African war "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 5/24/2011

    " I want to go back and start this book fresh with different expectations. I just finished reading her childhood memoir, and I wasn't really ready for how dark this would be. I liked it, but it makes me so sad that I almost physically hurt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maryn | 2/21/2011

    " really excellent. i don't always like alexandra fuller as a person, but i always like her as a writer: her unflinching, direct honesty, her ability to look things in the face and call them what they are, are far and away her best qualities. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Claire | 2/12/2011

    " Disappointed after reading Don't let's go to the dogs tonight; although some characters are interesting, format is somehow stilted. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shanna | 1/8/2011

    " Great book - written very real and raw but still moments of humor. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Karen | 1/3/2011

    " Fascinating, well-written, but hated the content. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robanna | 11/28/2010

    " Not for the faint-of-heart. It's like watching a train wreck. Explains a lot about the ghosts that live in people's minds. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bella | 11/15/2010

    " Haunting, brutal, honest and funny at times, this is the kind of book that stays with you long after you have put it down. "

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About the Author
Author Alexandra Fuller

Alexandra Fuller was born in England in 1969. In 1972, she moved with her family to a farm in southern Africa. She lived in Africa until her mid-twenties. In 1994, she moved to Wyoming. She is the author of three memoirs, including the New York Times bestseller Cocktail Hour under the Tree of Forgetfulness.

About the Narrator

Lisette Lecat began her career in her native South Africa, where she had stage roles and did extensive radio and voice-over work both commercially and for the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Living in Spain, England, and the United States, she did a wide range of voice-over work in three languages. She has won thirteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award for best female solo narration.