Extended Audio Sample

Download Saint Francis of Assisi Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Saint Francis of Assisi (Unabridged) Audiobook, by G. K. Chesterton
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (810 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: G. K. Chesterton Narrator: Bernard Mayes Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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This biography of St. Francis examines the life of a pure artist, a man whose whole life was a poem. Yet St. Francis also acknowledged the mystic responsibility to communicate his divine experience. Chesterton examines the existence of the pure and the mystic artist in one man. The result is an understanding of St. Francis in both body and soul, two essential aspects because the Saint saw religion as a kind of love afair; both spiritual and material. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 1/22/2014

    " Wonderful picture of a beautiful soul. Thank God for St. Francis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joe | 1/8/2014

    " This book was not quite what I expected, but still very good. It seemed as if the author was describing only what was happening around St Francis during his life, but towards the end I realized that by doing this I had a very good understanding of his life. It was an interesting technique, and I probably will re-read in the future to see what else I can gain from it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrea Walker | 1/5/2014

    " It's well written, well researched and everything else one can expect from a biography by Chesterton. Chesterton was a Christian Apologist, which for a very long time I thought meant that he was apologising for Christianity and the horrors committed in its name. I have a better understanding of it now. As one can imagine, his books reflect his views and this one is no different. It is, however, a very readable biography of a man who, if other biographies I've read are right, was quite a radical in his day. It also interests me because Saint Francis was born not long after Cadfael 'lived', though in Europe rather than England. It gives me an interesting perspective on history to contrast the life of the real man with the life of the fictional monk. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Phillip | 1/3/2014

    " Well, if you are interested in a biography of St. Francis, this is not the book for you. If you want a poetic, intellectual, slightly rambling, Kerouac-esque outline of St. Francis, then there you go. This is my first book by Chesterfield, so I don't know if he always writes like this -- if so, I may avoid him. It was short, I'll give him that! I did learn a little about the actual subject matter, but if this book hadnt been short, I wouldn't have finished it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Greg | 12/29/2013

    " Not nearly as much a book about Francis as a book about Chesterton. You can learn a little about Francis here but this is mainly Mr. Chesterton's ode to himself and his opinions. His effort to explain away the Inquisition is particularly bizarre. He does have some great lines and insights though, in particular his description of mysticism. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anita | 12/26/2013

    " It really was worth plowing through the complicated writing in this book; but GK Chesterton is expert on the subject of St Francis, so study needed to begin with him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cara | 12/6/2013

    " One of the greatest biographies I've ever read. Not because I learned much about Frankie-boy, but Chesterton rocks my face off, in the true 90s sense of the phrase. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Fr. Ryan Humphries | 11/17/2013

    " An amazing and insightful spiritual biography that's light on factual details, heavy on context and depth and chock full of Chestertonian wit and wordplay. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sharon | 10/17/2013

    " More of an essay about St. Francis than a biography. I find Chesterton a bit difficult to read because his writing weaves much philosophy into his storytelling, and I struggle with philosophy. I do like his wit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 john | 8/5/2013

    " A great introductory biography on the life of St. Francis of Assissi. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel Lower | 6/21/2013

    " Awesome life of St. Francis. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Greg | 6/20/2013

    " Really not a biography--more of the author's thoughts on the life of Saint Francis. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vance Halfaker | 12/18/2012

    " Chesterton is good for your health. Read him. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 11/9/2012

    " Really readable and basic, includes some of Chesterton talking about what we perceive as truth and things. Glad I spent the time on it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pol | 8/3/2012

    " "There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds" "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nikolas | 7/22/2011

    " Gives an interesting critique of journalism as a discipline contrasting it with History. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 11/14/2010

    " Awesome life of St. Francis. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 2/10/2010

    " Not the introduction/bioography I was expecting, but that serves me right for thinking Chesterton would be predictable.
    Instead I got a beaustiful topsy-turvy sketch of the character of a poet whose life was a poem lived out for his maker. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Darren | 10/16/2009

    " This book read more like one of Chesterton's personal dilemmas. That historians write about historical figures without giving historical context. He rambles on about how to write a good biography rather than actually teaching the reader. I found it difficult to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren | 9/9/2009

    " I can't say that I learned a whole lot about St. Francis, or that I have a more favorable view of him, but there were a few very good lines and points. "

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About the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936) was born in London. He went on to study art at the Slade School and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind’s spiritual progress. After his conversion to Catholicism in 1922, Chesterton wrote mainly on religious topics such as in Orthodoxy and Heretics. He is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in The Innocence of Father Brown.

About the Narrator

Bernard Mayes is a teacher, administrator, corporate executive, broadcaster, actor, dramatist, and former international commentator on US culture. He is best known for his readings of historical classics.