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Download Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep (Dramatised) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep (Dramatised) Audiobook, by Raymond Chandler
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (38,491 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Raymond Chandler Narrator: Toby Stephens, Kelly Burke, Barbara Barnes, Madeleine Potter, Leah Brotherhood, Sam Dale, Sean Baker, Iain Batchelor Publisher: AudioGO Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2011 ISBN:
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A brand new BBC Radio 4 full-cast dramatisation of a classic Raymond Chandler mystery featuring private eye, Philip Marlowe. Los Angeles PI Philip Marlowe is working for the Sternwood family. Old man Sternwood, crippled and wheelchair-bound, is being given the squeeze by a blackmailer and he wants Marlowe to make the problem go away. But with Sternwood's two wild, devil-may-care daughters prowling LA's seedy backstreets, Marlowe's got his work cut out - and that's before he stumbles over the first corpse...

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 2/20/2014

    " This book was even better the second time... I suspect that all Chandler's books are. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 D.J. Murphy | 2/17/2014

    " I like Raymond Chandler. He gets five stars from me just because he is so damn good. I also have, kept in a handy place, a collection of his correspondence. Most of his letters are only a page or two and this is a book that, wherever it falls open, you will be entertained. Currently I am working hard and furious to get a thriller of my own proofed, polished, and on to your bookshelf. When I'm struggling, trying to fix something, trying to get it just right, Chandler is one of the authors I turn to for examples of "just right." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hermione Laake | 2/11/2014

    " Mmmmmmmmm - I liked the first chapter, Carmen is scary - and some other bits. The phrases are a bit irritating: 'her mouth looked like the prelude to a scream' that sort of thing. On the other hand there are some good wise cracks; I think that is what you call them. But then crime fiction is not supposed to be well-written. Anyway Raymond Chandler does care. In his essay entitled 'The gentle Art of Murder' he says that fictional writing is about redemption. I rather like that.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher Krowka | 2/8/2014

    " You can find actual reviews elsewhere, so I'll just say that I gave it five stars not because it's best in genre, but because it's most iconic in genre, the same way I'd give Star Wars five stars even though you can see the strings on the X-Wings. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nat | 2/4/2014

    " What do I think? I think Chandler the writer was my hero. Forget Hammett. He never reached Chandler's heights. Language, the creation of a mythical LA, the virtual inventor the very best hard-boiled high-principled PI. The man's my hero. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 1/21/2014

    " The birth of noir, and not nearly as cliche-riddled as the evolution of the genre would have you believe. Marlowe is a sharp protagonist, competent and funny and surprising. His narration is charmingly overwritten. The plot is a tangled mess, a sloppy series of detours and half-developed characters, and it amounts to little of substance. Sound, fury, etc. Painfully antiquated gender politics, but an otherwise enjoyable tour through a bygone (but blessedly not halcyon) California. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trunks Carter | 1/13/2014

    " A great book. No plot. But still great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather Pagano | 1/11/2014

    " The Big Sleep was a splendid foundational example of its genre. Sometimes when I read books that defined a genre long ago, I have to keep reminding myself that the book isn't cliche, it invented the cliche. In the case of The Big Sleep I never once felt like anything was cliche- a foundation for the conventions of its genre, sure. It had all the conventions I was expecting. But the character of Marlowe and all the other characters in the book kept everything fresh and exciting. And the gritty realism mixed with Marlowe's sarcastic personal philosophy was just too cool and fun. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 S Bond Herndon | 1/9/2014

    " What can one say? It's Chandler. You either like him or you don't. I always enjoyed his stuff, especially this one. Never became much of a Perry Mason fan, though, probably because of the TV show's long run and my ultimate boredom with it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa Anderson | 12/14/2013

    " 'Get up, angel. You look like a Pekinese.' "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jillian | 11/8/2013

    " Pulpy oldtime murder mystery. A good story, though hard to get attached to the characters. I liked the gritty portrayal of old Los Angeles. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carolyn | 10/28/2013

    " This is what a mystery should be with the classic private eye, the damsel in distress, and the dramatic conclusion. Sit back and enjoy Chandler at his best.--Then go watch the classy movie starring Humphrey Bogart. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aimee | 10/26/2013

    " One of the earliest novels involving a private eye, femme fatale, etc. I thought it was just okay. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew Beggs | 10/22/2013

    " pretty screwed up at times but it had rich metaphors and similes with a very interesting protagonist. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mansi | 9/23/2013

    " The book isn't written badly and seems to have a decent plot but in the days of DNA analysis and advanced forensics, the investigation just doesn't seem to hold up "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie McCall | 4/6/2013

    " Great fast moving action and twists "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan Urquhart | 2/28/2013

    " Official sequel to The Afternoon Nap. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Birchall | 1/30/2013

    " noir at its very best "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ak Sabapathy | 12/16/2012

    " "Dead men are heavier than broken heart"... heh,good "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tamara Kelly | 10/2/2012

    " Just so good. To be read on rainy days with a martini in hand. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gail | 9/9/2012

    " An extremely murkey plotline interferes with the reader's enjoyment of a good noir novel. This book shows how much Chandler influenced Robert Parker--and how much better a writer Chandler was. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dan Burcea | 8/1/2012

    " This is were it all started. The noir detective genre, the cool smart cop with bad manners and a heart of gold. l like better the stories with bad cops like LA Confidential but as it is Chandler's story makes a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Preston | 4/7/2012

    " Thoroughly enjoyed this novel. Chandler's grammar can be a bit off but it adds to the intended effect of the story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark Wadman | 4/3/2012

    " hard-boiled detective fiction peppered with some suppressed homoeroticism. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael | 7/7/2011

    " Chandler's oft-imitated wryness isn't quite as developed in this book as the later ones and the plot leaves a lot to be desired, but this is the Philip Marlowe book that started it all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tanya | 7/5/2011

    " Aside from the jarring, dated sexism in this book (there are two female characters, and both of them get smacked around a little for their own good) this is a great classic pulp fiction read. Mystery! Fun! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 6/22/2011

    " A wonderful book, despite the fact that its style has become a cliche. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kathy | 6/17/2011

    " I wasn't a fan of this book. Everything about it seemed so cliché. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cirque | 6/12/2011

    " Good if you're in the mood for it "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nathan | 6/9/2011

    " It's not about the characters. It's not about the plot. What makes this book great is the crackling dialogue. Phillip Marlowe is the gold standard of noir p.i.'s he even out cools Sam Spade. So read it and find out and evertthing will be jake. Okey. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 6/4/2011

    " "He wore a blue uniform coat that fit him the way a stall fits a horse." A great summer read. Better than the movie. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 5/26/2011

    " While this wasn't quite as good as The Long Goodbye, it was still awesome as hell. I've seen the OG film version, but after reading this I'm excited to see the 70s version also. "

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About the Author
Author Raymond Chandler

Raymond Chandler (1888–1959) was an American novelist and screenwriter. In 1932, after losing his job as an oil company executive, Chandler at age forty-four and during the Depression decided to become a writer. His first novel, The Big Sleep, was published in 1939. In addition to his short stories, Chandler published only seven novels during his life. In the year before he died, he was elected president of the Mystery Writers of America.